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Mark A. Purschwitz, Ph.D. Extension Professor Agricultural Safety and Health Specialist Mark A. Purschwitz, Ph.D. Extension Professor Agricultural Safety.

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Presentation on theme: "Mark A. Purschwitz, Ph.D. Extension Professor Agricultural Safety and Health Specialist Mark A. Purschwitz, Ph.D. Extension Professor Agricultural Safety."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mark A. Purschwitz, Ph.D. Extension Professor Agricultural Safety and Health Specialist Mark A. Purschwitz, Ph.D. Extension Professor Agricultural Safety and Health Specialist Tractor Rollover Safety and ROPS

2 Tractor Overturns (Rollovers) Called “rollovers” because the tractor rolls over on top of the victim Not to be confused with “runovers”, where the tractor/machine runs over the victim Crushing trauma Survivable perhaps 50% of the time Single most common farm-related cause of fatalities Called “rollovers” because the tractor rolls over on top of the victim Not to be confused with “runovers”, where the tractor/machine runs over the victim Crushing trauma Survivable perhaps 50% of the time Single most common farm-related cause of fatalities

3 Tractor Overturns, cont. Occur for many reasons Most overturns occur to the side Some overturns occur to the rear (tractor flips over backwards) ROPS (Roll-Over Protective Structures) are needed to prevent serious injury and death Occur for many reasons Most overturns occur to the side Some overturns occur to the rear (tractor flips over backwards) ROPS (Roll-Over Protective Structures) are needed to prevent serious injury and death

4 Reasons for Tractor Overturns Steep slopes and/or rough ground Turning too fast Carrying loads high (e.g., round bale) Roadway collisions Improper tractor setup – wheels not set wide for slopes, tractor not weighted enough to remain stable Improper hitching (hitching above drawbar) Steep slopes and/or rough ground Turning too fast Carrying loads high (e.g., round bale) Roadway collisions Improper tractor setup – wheels not set wide for slopes, tractor not weighted enough to remain stable Improper hitching (hitching above drawbar)

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10 Type of ROPS (see slides) Two-post or two-post with canopy Two-post folding, for low buildings Four-post Carefully designed and tested; never should be home-made or modified. An authentic ROPS should have a label, sticker, etc., indicating what standard the ROPS complies with. Two-post or two-post with canopy Two-post folding, for low buildings Four-post Carefully designed and tested; never should be home-made or modified. An authentic ROPS should have a label, sticker, etc., indicating what standard the ROPS complies with.

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15 ROPS Cabs ROPS Cab (protective structure built into frame of cab Supposed to have a tag or sticker inside, showing certification Cabs supplied by tractor manufacturers have been ROPS Cabs since early 1970s Beware of old, add-on cabs that might just be for weather protection ROPS Cab (protective structure built into frame of cab Supposed to have a tag or sticker inside, showing certification Cabs supplied by tractor manufacturers have been ROPS Cabs since early 1970s Beware of old, add-on cabs that might just be for weather protection

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17 Zone of Protection for Two-Post ROPS Note two-post ROPS in next slide Imagine how tractor would look upside down ROPS absorbs some energy, may deflect (bend) slightly, but does not crush We want to keep the operator inside the zone of protection. Note two-post ROPS in next slide Imagine how tractor would look upside down ROPS absorbs some energy, may deflect (bend) slightly, but does not crush We want to keep the operator inside the zone of protection.

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21 Older Tractors ROPS not standard in U.S. until 1985 Over two million tractors lack ROPS Older, non-ROPS tractors more likely to be used for “chores” like mowing along ditches and roadways, pulling wagons, having a front-end loader, etc. Old tractors can maintain utility for 60+ years Often purchased by rural landowners. ROPS not standard in U.S. until 1985 Over two million tractors lack ROPS Older, non-ROPS tractors more likely to be used for “chores” like mowing along ditches and roadways, pulling wagons, having a front-end loader, etc. Old tractors can maintain utility for 60+ years Often purchased by rural landowners.

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24 Examples of ROPS Protection See following slides of overturns. Think about what happened in each case and how the ROPS protected the operator. Think what would have happened without the ROPS. Again shows the need to keep operator inside the zone of protection. See following slides of overturns. Think about what happened in each case and how the ROPS protected the operator. Think what would have happened without the ROPS. Again shows the need to keep operator inside the zone of protection.

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28 Role of the Seatbelt Keeps operator inside “zone of protection” If you are an employee, you must wear it Seatbelt keeps you from getting thrown out, especially in a rougher or faster overturn. Wearing it will become natural; you just have to get used to it. Keeps operator inside “zone of protection” If you are an employee, you must wear it Seatbelt keeps you from getting thrown out, especially in a rougher or faster overturn. Wearing it will become natural; you just have to get used to it.

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30 Seatbelt, cont. The ROPS often limits a tractor overturn to 90 degrees (tractor stops on its side, or rears up and stops with nose in the air.) Because of this, a ROPS can still limit injury even if the seatbelt is not worn. A ROPS without a seatbelt is better than no ROPS at all. Therefore, if you feel you will never wear a seatbelt, get a ROPS anyway. The ROPS often limits a tractor overturn to 90 degrees (tractor stops on its side, or rears up and stops with nose in the air.) Because of this, a ROPS can still limit injury even if the seatbelt is not worn. A ROPS without a seatbelt is better than no ROPS at all. Therefore, if you feel you will never wear a seatbelt, get a ROPS anyway.

31 Prevention of Tractor-Related Injuries and Deaths #1 -- Have a ROPS on the tractor. Operator training is important but not sufficient – there are situations beyond the operator’s control. Every operator is human and subject to mistakes, distractions, hurrying, being tired, etc. That’s why you need ROPS. #1 -- Have a ROPS on the tractor. Operator training is important but not sufficient – there are situations beyond the operator’s control. Every operator is human and subject to mistakes, distractions, hurrying, being tired, etc. That’s why you need ROPS.

32 Prevention of Tractor-Related Injuries and Deaths, cont. Use the right size tractor for the job. Set up the tractor correctly – wheel spacing, weighting. Always hitch to drawbar (or 3-pt hitch). Never attach a chain or cable above the drawbar (wants to flip tractor backwards.) Use the right size tractor for the job. Set up the tractor correctly – wheel spacing, weighting. Always hitch to drawbar (or 3-pt hitch). Never attach a chain or cable above the drawbar (wants to flip tractor backwards.)

33 Prevention of Tractor-Related Injuries and Deaths, cont. Keep speed under control, especially on rough ground or when turning. Carry loads low. Eliminate or mark known overturn hazards, like hidden stumps, rocks, washouts. Avoid roadway collisions – proper operation, good lighting and marking. Keep speed under control, especially on rough ground or when turning. Carry loads low. Eliminate or mark known overturn hazards, like hidden stumps, rocks, washouts. Avoid roadway collisions – proper operation, good lighting and marking.

34 Obtaining a Retrofit ROPS Check with your tractor dealer first. NEVER build a ROPS – they are carefully engineered and manufactured. Check the comprehensive online guide to retrofit ROPS: “The Kentucky ROPS Guide” Check with your tractor dealer first. NEVER build a ROPS – they are carefully engineered and manufactured. Check the comprehensive online guide to retrofit ROPS: “The Kentucky ROPS Guide”

35 If there is an overturn: Requires professional extrication Improper extrication can kill Call EMS immediately Extrication must be slow and controlled Protect victim if possible from spilled fuel, oil, battery acid, etc., and pesticides if a sprayer is involved Requires professional extrication Improper extrication can kill Call EMS immediately Extrication must be slow and controlled Protect victim if possible from spilled fuel, oil, battery acid, etc., and pesticides if a sprayer is involved

36 Thank You


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