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Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long1 Chapter 5 Information Management By Dr. Larry W. Long.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long1 Chapter 5 Information Management By Dr. Larry W. Long."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long1 Chapter 5 Information Management By Dr. Larry W. Long

2 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long2 Defining information SYMBOLSSYMBOLS –Letters, words, numbers, etc. RANDOMNESSRANDOMNESS –No information, or very little information.

3 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long3 DEFINING INFORMATION NONRANDOMNESSNONRANDOMNESS –“Chunking” of symbols. CHUNKINGCHUNKING – – Recognizable patterns of symbols INCREASING LEVELS OF INFORMATION

4 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long4 Macro-Information: Chunking in the Organization COMMUNICATION IS COSTLY ORGANIZATIONS BECOME SEGMENTED Organizational Charts Demonstrate Segmentation

5 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long5 Bases for variation in information mgt. strategy Topic or organization function based -- e.g., info about marketing, new processes, human resources, etc. To make decisions -- i.e., to identify & solve problems Retrieval efficiency -- e.g. company library Information transmission -- requirements for different channels like memos, , speeches, etc.

6 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long6 STAR NETWORK Open Communication - “ uncontrolled network” VP - finance VP - Production VP - Engineering VP - Sales Legal Counsel

7 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long7 CONTROLLED NETWORKS (Controlled Communication) Circle Wheel Chain

8 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long8 Hierarchical Network Several Layers Vertical Communication Network “Tallness”

9 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long9 Horizontal Networks “Flatness” –fewer vertical layers –horizontally wider Example: Small business –One owner with several employees

10 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long10 Mixture of Network Types Organizations frequently contain a mixture of networks Example: A University

11 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long11 Two Ways Organizations Structure Themselves to Complete a Task by Function... by Project/Matrix Proj. Mgr La Proj. Mgr Okla Proj. Mgr Texas Proj. Mgr Mid East CEO VP

12 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long12 Organization network influence on information exchange -- Functional divisions & level in the hierarchy indicate what information content is “more” or “less” important.” Role location influences the time spent in source & receiver roles Role location influences primary & secondary information sources & recipients for each employee

13 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long13 How information is assessed Jargon:Jargon: an organization’s “language” - can help or hinder Personal validationPersonal validation –Intuitive Vs. Analytic, or –emotional Vs. rational Social EvaluationSocial Evaluation –“Public Scrutiny” –Intersubjective reliability Influenced by CultureInfluenced by Culture

14 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long14 Potential source role problems Lack of self confidence Fear of others leads to exaggeration Expectations about others may create secretiveness

15 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long15 (continued) Potential source role problems Preoccupation with creating/sending messages Mislead those that threaten us Experts give incomplete information Cultural values restrict what we tell others

16 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long16 Limits on information impact To be completely informed is impossibleTo be completely informed is impossible Information cannot totally control behaviorInformation cannot totally control behavior Message existence does not imply information existenceMessage existence does not imply information existence Humans are limited information processorsHumans are limited information processors

17 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long17 Potential receiver role problems Mistrust & Competition makes us suspicious Stress causes information avoidance Traditions cause stereotyping Anonymous sources are mistrusted

18 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long18 (continued) Potential receiver role problems Ambiguous information creates uncertainty Inconsistency from a source lowers validity Overload inhibits understanding/underload induces boredom Competitors give false information Copyright 1996

19 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long19 Information management principles Assess probability of success before implementation -- conduct a “dry” run to test workabilityAssess probability of success before implementation -- conduct a “dry” run to test workability Identify information source motivesIdentify information source motives Make information concreteMake information concrete Be ConsistentBe Consistent Avoid information overload & underload -- seek a balanceAvoid information overload & underload -- seek a balance

20 Copyright 2003, Dr. Larry W. Long20 (continued) Information management principles Adjust to perceptions of competition -- i.e., conflicting information sourcesAdjust to perceptions of competition -- i.e., conflicting information sources Adjust to trust and comfort levels of your receiversAdjust to trust and comfort levels of your receivers Adjust attitudes toward changeAdjust attitudes toward change Use source/receiver role exchange to enhance precisionUse source/receiver role exchange to enhance precision Use appropriate information channels -- don’t rely on 1 channelUse appropriate information channels -- don’t rely on 1 channel


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