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College of Engineering and Science Graduate TA Training Workshop Day 2: Active Learning Dr. Lisa Benson Ms. Justine Chasmar August 12 - 13, 2014 CES GTA.

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Presentation on theme: "College of Engineering and Science Graduate TA Training Workshop Day 2: Active Learning Dr. Lisa Benson Ms. Justine Chasmar August 12 - 13, 2014 CES GTA."— Presentation transcript:

1 College of Engineering and Science Graduate TA Training Workshop Day 2: Active Learning Dr. Lisa Benson Ms. Justine Chasmar August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

2 Active Learning By the end of this session, you will be able to: Summarize what active learning is Summarize the potential benefits of using active learning techniques in your class or lab Identify active learning techniques that would be appropriate for your class or lab Practice an activity for your class or lab that engages students beyond passively listening to a lecture August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

3 What is Active Learning? Exercises in class: Collaborative learning (peer instruction, paired problem solving, etc.) Problem formulation and prediction Trouble-shooting Brainstorming Concept mapping More advanced active learning techniques: Role-playing Simulation and games Case studies Challenge-based (or discovery-based) learning Project-based learning August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

4 Why Active Learning? Brainstorm: List as many benefits to active learning as you can with your neighbor(s) August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

5 Why Active Learning? Improved attendance Deeper questioning Higher grades and lower failing rates Greater lasting interest in the subject August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop From Freeman, Eddy, McDonough, Smith, Okoroafor, Jordt, and Wenderoth, 2014.

6 More evidence that active learning has positive effects on learning CES GTA Training Workshop August , 2014 From Freeman et al, 2014: Effect sizes by discipline. (A) Data on examination scores, concept inventories, or other assessments. (B) Data on failure rates. Numbers below data points indicate the number of independent studies; horizontal lines are 95% confidence intervals.

7 How do you fit it in? Can you afford NOT to? Our job is not to COVER material, but to UNCOVER it Time managements tips (from NETI – National Effective Teaching Institute) Use handouts Write material out to save stenography time Leave holes and gaps axes without graphs questions without answers Don’t spend class time on material for definitions and prerequisite stuff August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

8 How do you fit it in? Time managements tips Use handouts Write material out to save stenography time Leave holes and gaps axes without graphs questions without answers Don’t spend class time on material for definitions and prerequisite stuff August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

9 How do you get started? Assign one to two tasks during a 50-minute class period Students work in groups of Allow about 5 minutes per activity August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

10 How do you get started? Simple is good (at least for starters): Sketch and label a flow chart (schematic, force diagram, etc) for this system. Draw a graph of what the problem solution should look like. Give several reasons why you might need or want to know the solution. What's the next step? What's wrong with what I just wrote? How could I check this solution? What question do you have about what we just did? What variations of this problem might I put on the next test? August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

11 Example: Think Aloud Pair Problem Solving (TAPPS) Students work in pairs on a series of problems Specific roles switch with each problem: Problem Solver and Listener The problem solver reads the problem aloud and talks through a solution. The listener follows all of the problem solver's steps Listener may ask questions if the problem solver's thought process becomes unclear Instructor monitors activity and enforces rules Paying attention to Listeners Emphasizing to Problem Solvers that getting the “right” answer is not as important as verbalizing the route to the answer August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

12 How and why Problem Solvers reached the answer is more important than giving the correct answer Problem Solver duties: Having paper, pencil, calculator, other resources needed to solve the problem Discussing possible approaches before solving the problem Reading the problem aloud Starting to solve the problem Verbalizing thoughts and actions Problem Solver difficulties: Thinking aloud isn’t easy Continuing dialog when stuck: “I’m stuck. I’d better start over.” “No, that won’t work..” Listener duties: Not interrupting when PS is thinking Reminding PS to verbalize what s/he is thinking and doing Making sure that s/he understands each step that PS takes Not ignoring PS and/or starting to work the problem on his/her own Listener should not continue if: S/he doesn’t understand S/he thinks a mistake has been made

13 TAPPS Activity: Fill the Container You have only 2 containers, one of which will hold 9.0 liters when filled to a mark at the top, and another which will hold 4.0 liters when filled to a similar mark. You have an unlimited supply of water, but no other equipment of any kind. How can you measure out a volume of exactly 6.0 liters of water in the 9.0- liter container? From the National Effective Teaching Institute (NETI), Honolulu, HI, June 2007 Problem Solver duties:  Having paper, pencil, calculator, other resources needed to solve the problem  Discussing possible approaches before solving the problem  Reading the problem aloud  Starting to solve the problem  Verbalizing thoughts and actions Listener duties:  Not interrupting when PS is thinking  Reminding PS to verbalize what s/he is thinking and doing  Making sure that s/he understands each step that PS takes  Not ignoring PS and/or starting to work the problem on his/her own

14 What about reluctant students? “Remind” them to work together Make yourself visible to them After a few exercises, most go along with it Food for thought: Even if 10% of your students don’t participate, you’re better off than with lecturing and having 90% (or more) not participate August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop

15 Further reading: Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; and Wenderoth, Mary Pat Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering and mathematics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, published ahead of print May 12, 2014, doi: /pnas mfr mfr National Effective Teaching Institute Workshop Handout, available upon request at Johnson, D. W., Johnson, R. T., and Smith, K. A Active learning: Cooperation in the college classroom (2 nd ed.) Edina, MN: Interaction Book Co. King, A From sage on the stage to guide on the side. College Teaching, 41(1), Angelo, T. A. and Cross, K. P Classroom Assessment Techniques: A handbook for college teaching (2 nd ed.), San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. More tips and resources on active learning are available on the Clemson University College of Engineering and Science Graduate TA Training website: training/index.html training/index.html August , 2014 CES GTA Training Workshop


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