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WELCOME SUMMER CURRICULUM INSTITUTE August 5,2014 Human Services Career Cluster Career Technical Education Partnership[CTEP] Early Childhood Pathway.

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Presentation on theme: "WELCOME SUMMER CURRICULUM INSTITUTE August 5,2014 Human Services Career Cluster Career Technical Education Partnership[CTEP] Early Childhood Pathway."— Presentation transcript:

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2 WELCOME SUMMER CURRICULUM INSTITUTE August 5,2014 Human Services Career Cluster Career Technical Education Partnership[CTEP] Early Childhood Pathway

3 WELCOME SUMMER CURRICULUM INSTITUTE August 6,2014 Human Services Career Cluster Career Technical Education Partnership[CTEP] Early Childhood Pathway

4 Building Early Childhood Development & Service Programs through Postsecondary Alignment August 6, 2014 CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of Career Technical Education Partnership (CTEP) Grant

5 Welcome and Introductions Margo Venable Director HSCC CTEP Grant and Dean Division of School and Academic Programs Camden County College Yvonne Kilson and Kaina Hanna HSCC CTEP Program Coordinators Camden County College CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.

6 Creation of a Statewide Advisory Committee Provide student leadership through FCCLA Career Technical Student Organization Deliver high quality Professional Development to all HSCC Stakeholders FOUR CTEP GRANT GOALS: CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.

7 Students Graduate High School CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.

8 *Source: States' Career Clusters Initiative, 2005 New Jersey CTEP Grant Human Services Career Focuses on Four Pathways CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of NJ Program of Study Curriculum Development Model

9 Early Childhood Development & Services

10 CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of POS Course

11 CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of Unit Template Exemplar Standards Alignment FCCLA Intra-curricular embedded in learning activities and targets Research Based Curriculum Design

12 College and Career Readiness From here To here

13 *Offer Districts opportunity to Pilot HSCC *Districts complete a request to participate document *Pilot District personnel will attend orientation *Identified Pilot Districts will work with CTEP Staff to integrate model ECE POS framework *Pilot District personnel will attend all professional development *Pilot Districts will provide feedback at the regularly scheduled *Pilot Districts will assist in evaluating and revising ECE POS curricula * roll out model for pilots HSCC Pilot Program Process CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.

14 Camden County Technical School Hudson County Career Academy Matawan Regional High School Sterling Regional High School Winslow Township High School 2013/14 ECD PILOT SCHOOLS

15 Common Core Standards Common Career Technical Core College & Career Readiness Curriculum Maps General Course Outline Progression of Lessons Assessment of Student Learning The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you can see.” ~Winston Churchill CTEP Grant is supported by funds from the Federal Carl D. Perkins, Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.

16 A SPOTLIGHT LESSONS FROM NEW JERSEY EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT & SERVICES PILOTS

17 Teaching in a Technical High School, Using Early Childhood Pilot Curriculum Materials

18 HSCC CTEP Early Childhood POS Model Child Development Course Pilot School: Camden County Technical School, Sicklerville, NJ Teacher: Julie Laucks

19 Technical Comprehensive  Students choose career and remain for 4 years  Students gain hands on experience in full time daycare setting  42 minute periods, 3 periods a day, totaling approximately 2 hours and 10 minutes of shop time per day  Students have choice of elective for program of study  minute periods, once a day  May not have hands on experience daily

20  Safety and environmental concerns for infants  Discussion list of concerns, students choose one to research  Students make poster describing concerns

21  Using technology to research why items are not safe for infants  Research Google images to decide what and how to make poster  Formative assessment  › group discussion,presentation of project

22 Crib safety Poisons Sunburn

23  FCCLA State and STAR events  STAR= Students Taking Action with Recognition, 1 st place qualifies for National Meeting  Utilize planning process summary  Implement project ideas by making display boards and portfolios

24  Use hands on knowledge to teach a lesson to the judges as if they were children of a specific age group  Portfolio completion  Resource container

25 Focus on Children  Develop a project that involves children and their development  Work with children daily to complete tasks for project  Create a display board with project’s accomplishments Teach and Train  Choose a teacher to shadow  Research teaching licensing requirements  Self assess skills and interest in teaching as a career  Prepare and teach a lesson in chosen classroom  Prepare a portfolio

26  FCCLA State and STAR events allow students to apply knowledge learned in different levels of early childhood  Apply skills learned in theory instruction to create a project that can be used with a specific age group of young children  FCCLA projects are a good examples of a Summative Learning Assessment for students

27 Child Development Theorists

28 HSCC CTEP Early Childhood POS Model Child Development Course Pilot School: Sterling High School, Somerdale, NJ Teacher: Carrin Bachowski

29 Why is Childhood Study Crucial? Research has shown that early childhood may be the most important life stage for brain development. A baby’s brain is about one quarter the size of an adults’. Scientists have found that babies’ brains develop in response to stimulation. – Arouses senses such as sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. Babies who are stimulated develop more quickly and have a more secure self-image. Child Development Theorists provide insight onto how children grow and learn.

30 What is a theory? A theory should allow us to predict and explain human behavior It should be stated in such a way that it can be shown to be false It must be open to scientific investigation

31 Child Development Theorists Although researches don’t always agree, scientific researchers have agreed upon the five following general rules. – Development is similar for each individual – Development builds upon earlier learning. – Development proceeds at an individual rate. – The different areas of development are interrelated. – Development is a lifelong process.

32 Psychoanalytic Theories: Freud’s Psychosexual Theory – Personality has 3 parts – There are 5 stages of psychosexual development – Oedipus complex allows child to identify with same-sex parent – Fixation is an unresolved conflict during a stage of development

33 Phallic Stage Child’s pleasure focuses on genitals Figure 2.1 Latency Stage Child represses sexual interest and develops social and intellectual skills Anal Stage Child’s pleasure focuses on anus Genital Stage A time of sexual reawakening; source of sexual pleasure becomes someone outside of the family Oral Stage Infant’s pleasure centers on mouth Freudian Stages 6 yrs to puberty Birth to 1½ yrs 1½ to 3 yrs Puberty onward 3 to 6 years

34 Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory: – There are 8 stages of psychosocial development – Each has a unique developmental task – Developmental change occurs throughout life span Key Points of Psychoanalytic Theories: – Early experiences and family relationships are very important to development – Unconscious aspects of the mind are considered – Personality is best seen as a developmental process

35 Erikson’s StagesDevelopmental Period Trust vs MistrustInfancy (first year) Autonomy vs shame & doubt Infancy (1 to 3 years) Initiative vs guiltEarly childhood (3 to 5 years) Industry vs inferiorityMiddle and late childhood Identity vs identity confusion Adolescence (10 to 20 years) Intimacy vs isolationEarly adulthood (20s, 30s) Generativity vs stagnation Middle adulthood (40s, 50s) Integrity vs despairLate adulthood (60s onward) Figure 2.2 Erikson’s Eight Life-Span Stages

36 Cognitive theories: Piaget’s cognitive developmental theory – Stresses conscious mental processes – Cognitive processes are influenced by biological maturation – Four stages of cognitive development in children – Assimilation and accommodation underlie how children understand the world, adapt to it, and organize their experiences

37 Preoperational Stage: The child begins to represent the world with words and images. These words and images reflect increased symbolic thinking and go beyond the connection of sensory information and physical action. Formal Operational Stage The adolescent reasons in more abstract idealistic and logical ways. Sensorimotor Stage: The infant constructs an understanding of the world by coordinating sensory experiences with physical actions: progressing from reflexive, instinctual action at birth to the beginning of symbolic thought toward end of the stage. Concrete Operational Stage: The child can now reason logically about concrete events and classify objects into different sets. Figure –15 years of age through adulthood Birth to 2 years of age 2 to 7 years of age 7 to 11 years of age Piaget’s Four Stages of Cognitive Development

38 Vygotsky’s sociocultural cognitive theory – Children actively construct their knowledge – Social interaction and culture guide cognitive development – Learning is based upon inventions of society – Knowledge is created through interactions with other people and objects in the culture – Less skilled persons learn from the more skilled Information-processing theory – Compares computers to the human mind – Thinking is information processing

39 Information is taken into brain Information gets processed, analyzed, and stored until use OUTPUT INPUT Information is used as basis of behaviors and interactions Information-Processing Theory math historyreligion geography science literature

40 Environment Person (cognitive) Behavior Bandura’s Social Cognitive Model Figure 2.4

41 Bandura’s Modeling/Imitation Child observes someone admired Child imitates behavior that seems rewarded

42 Urie Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory: – Environmental factors influence development – 5 environmental systems affect life-span development Eclectic theoretical orientation: – Selects features from other theories – No one theory has all the answers – Each theory can make a contribution to understanding life-span development

43 ExosystemMesosystems Macrosystem Family School & classroom Religion & groups Peer group Chronosystem School system Political philosophy National customs Economic patterns Social conditions Cultural values Community Mass media Medical institutions Figure 2.5 Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Theory of Development

44 Multiple Intelligence Theory: Howard Gardner: – Human beings have eight different kinds of intelligences – Each person has their own unique combination – Helped teachers rethink the way they work with children

45 Other Influences on Development Heredity: – Blood type – eye color – hair color Environment: – Children also learn attitudes and beliefs from their environments

46 What kind of learning suits you best?

47 HSCC CTEP Early Childhood POS Model Child Development Course Pilot School: Matawan Regional High School, Matawan, NJ Teacher: Carol Hoernle

48 Child Development Course Incorporating FCCLA STAR Events into curriculum: Story Book Ethics [Object Lesson]

49 HSCC CTEP Early Childhood POS Model Child Development Course Pilot School: Winslow Township High School Winslow, NJ Teacher: Cindy Gary

50 Introduction My goal is to prepare students for a career in the field of early childhood education. This course has focused on students understanding that children will grow and develop when provided with a positive learning environment.

51 To Accomplish this Goal: My first step is to break down and review the four areas of development and understand how children grow and master new skills: Physical Emotional Social Intellectual

52 Types of Early Childhood Programs We examine the various types of learning environments and services that are available for children that help them to develop. Students will begin to understand the importance of early intervention when teaching children. Head Start Private Public Schools Students will observe and examine the responsibilities in the early childhood field. Also, the personal characteristics of what determines a well rounded school and staff.

53 Observation and Participation Students begin to observe and document a child’s behavior and developmental milestones through classroom participation, assessments, anecdotal records, visual, and creating age appropriate lessons for the children. This was accomplished by putting students into small groups and assigning them a classroom. This taught students to co-work together and recognize everyone has a different approach to learning. Each month, students had a specific theme and lesson to follow: The four types of development: Physical Intellectual Social Emotional Students contact their teacher to inform them of their lesson. They were to understand the various needs that some of the children required. Students had an option to observe and participate with the specials needs classrooms. Each student created a portfolio that consists of materials they did throughout the school. It would include: lessons, photos, job shadowing assignment, examples of projects and activities they did. These items were to showcase their best work for a job interview or employment Observat io

54 HSCC CTEP Early Childhood POS Model Child Development Course Pilot School: Hudson County Career Academy Jersey City, NJ Teachers: Dyanne Bello and Lisette Companioni

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58 The 12 CCTC Career Ready Statements 1.Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee. 2.Apply appropriate academic and technical skills. 3.Attend to personal health and financial well-being. 4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason. 5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions. 6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation. 7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies. 8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management. 10.Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals. 11.Use technology to enhance productivity. 12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence. National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium NASDCTEc

59 Dr. Ingrid Campbell Dr. Michele Doughty Dr. Cheryl Chavis Yvonne Kilson Carole Weidman Patricia DiGioia-Laird Karen DiGiacobbe Carrin Bachowski Julie Laucks Carol Ott Carol Hoernle Camille Blair Alice Lemire Lisa Zeppetti Shaline Brown Fatemah Sedighi Susan Bodofsky Doris E. Eason Cindy Gary Maureen Reidenauer Special Thanks to HSCC ECD POS Curriculum Writers…….

60 Common Career Technical Core Standards Early Childhood Development & Services [HU-EC] 5- Evaluate safety and sanitation procedures associated with the early childhood education environment to assure compliance and prevent potential hazards. 6- Adhere to ethical and legal responsibilities, laws and regulations to protect children and families. 7- Apply principles of child growth and development, including social, emotional, physical and cognitive milestones, to provide comprehensive program offerings. 8- Evaluate curriculum for inclusiveness of children with special needs. 1- Demonstrate communication techniques with children to facilitate ongoing development and enhance learning. 2- Communicate effectively with fellow staff members to facilitate child development activities. 3- Maintain working knowledge of child development licensing and certification organizations to keep abreast of current procedures and changes. 4- Create and Maintain relationships between staff and parents/family members to encourage involvement and facilitate child development learning.

61 Extra Special Thanks…..


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