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Introduction to Radio Usage for Amsterdam Fire Department 20 May, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Radio Usage for Amsterdam Fire Department 20 May, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Radio Usage for Amsterdam Fire Department 20 May, 2011

2 The Main Points Essential to the Fire Service Not secure Limited resource Not always the best tool Habits and manners 5 point communications Different radios have different ranges Repeater vs. Direct Frequency usage Emergency Traffic Mayday Example primary radio events

3 An Essential Tool  Links FD to Dispatch  Links responding units and agencies  Links Incident Commander (I.C.) to resources.

4 Radios Are Not Secure  Anyone with a scanner can hear traffic  Sensitive or private information should not be transmitted  Patient names should never be used  Be aware that bystanders often overhear radio traffic  Life safety trumps privacy

5 Limited Resource  Many users share various frequencies  Keep transmissions to the point  Never sacrifice clarity for brevity  Be familiar with common terms  LISTEN

6 Not the best tool for:  Complicated instructions  Long back and forth discussions  Limited audience traffic  Use face to face communications when possible

7 Habits and Manners  Develop good habits of clarity and level tone  Its OK NOT to say “Please” and “Thank You” on the radio  Wait a second before and after talking with the button held  Radios are Push to Talk, NOT push to think  Be direct, confident, concise

8 5 Point Communications  Call Hey you its me “McCann, I.C.”  Response Yes you its me “I.C. McCann”  Message This is what I need “Exit the building”  Repeat Message Paraphrase to convey understanding ○ “You want me to exit the building”  Confirm Determine that recipient understands your message or repeat it again. ○ “Affirmative”

9 Radio Types  Base Stations Used for fixed facilities such as stations and dispatch centers Transmit with more power and taller antennas Expected to cover entire response area on direct  Mobile Radios Vehicle mounted Medium transmission power Expected to cover beyond operations area  Portable Radios Minimal power Handheld Expected to cover immediate operation area

10 Repeaters  Repeater channels use two frequencies  Remote radios (users) transmit on one frequency (F1) and receive on another (F2)  Repeater station (base) reverses the operation, transmitting on F2 and receiving on F1 F1 F2

11 Common Channels 1. Fire North – Communicate with Dispatch (repeater) 2. Fire West – Communicate with Responding Units (repeater) 3. Fire Central – 4. Fire East – 5. Ruby – Rae & Sourdough Tactical (repeater) 6. Gold – Statewide Mutual Aid – Check in 7. G TAC 1 – Gallatin County Incident Tactical channel 8. G TAC 2 – Gallatin County Incident Tactical channel 9. G TAC 3 – Gallatin County Incident Tactical channel 10. Red – Water Supply or other special division 11. Coral – Additional Tactical Channel for Division 12. Scarlett - Additional Tactical Channel for Division 13. Maroon - Additional Tactical Channel for Division 14. SAR – Search and Rescue (repeater) 15. North – Law Enforcement (repeater) 16. Amsterdam Tac – Our Assigned tactical channel

12 Emergency Traffic  Used to clear the frequency of non-vital traffic  Patient located  Unsafe situation  Any immediate threat or danger

13 Mayday  Firefighter in danger Lost Trapped Down Missing Low Air / out of air  Specific to a firefighter

14 Responding  Contact Dispatch on Fire North.  Provide department, unit, and incident responding to.  Example “Dispatch, Amsterdam Engine 9-1, Fire North” “Amsterdam Engine 9-1” “Engine 9-1 responding to Churchill Rd” “Engine 9-1 responding at 21:05”

15  Contact Dispatch on Fire North.  Provide department, unit, and the incident you have arrived at.  Example “Dispatch Amsterdam Engine 9-1, Fire North” “Amsterdam Engine 9-1” “On Scene, Churchill Rd.” “Amsterdam Engine 9-1 On Scene at 21:10” On Scene

16 Check - In  After going on scene you must check in with either the Incident Commander or the Check-in.  Note that check in may be on a separate channel (typically GOLD) for mutual aid or larger incidents.  Initial incident tactical channel (G-TAC) used if no check in channel designated.  Example “Churchill I.C., Amsterdam Engine 9-1, G-TAC 1” “Engine 9-1, Churchill I.C.” “Staged North, requesting check in” “List your crew” “Crew Leader McCann, DO McGhee, McGurk, and Malone” “Affirmative”

17 Tactical / Task Assignments  5 Point communication  Don’t just repeat, but understand the assignment  Example “Hogan, Churchill I.C.” “Churchill I.C., Hogan” “Ladder the second story window on the Bravo side” “Ladder the window on the Bravo side, second story” “Affirmative”

18 C.A.N. Report  Conditions Fire - Smoke, heat, wind Rescue - Extrication difficulty EMS – Patient status  Actions – what are you doing now? Pulling ceiling, removing doors, taking vitals  Needs – What do you need to complete your assignment? What do you foresee us needing to progress in the incident? SCBA Air status Tools, equipment, lights, crews

19 Example C.A.N. Report “Tracey, Churchill I.C.” “Churchill I.C., Tracey” “Give me a can report” “We’re on the second floor pulling ceiling. We’ve got light smoke that’s clearing out, no active fire. Our lowest bottle is at 3000 and it will take at least another crew to get all the attic exposed we want.” “You’re pulling ceiling on the second floor with no fire and light smoke that’s clearing up. You’re good on air and will need another crew up there to finish.” “Affirmative.”

20 Demobilization  All units must check out with the Incident Commander, or check in before leaving the scene.  Can be face to face or radio.  Radio Example. “Churchill I.C., Amsterdam Engine 9-1” “Engine 9-1, Churchill I.C.” “Crew and apparatus available, requesting demob.” “List your crew.” “Crew Leader McCann, DO McGhee, McGurk, and Malone” “Affirmative”

21 Clearing the scene  I.C. may clear all units with Dispatch if they are released at once.  Otherwise you must clear with Dispatch.  Example “Dispatch, Amsterdam Engine 9-1, Fire North” “Amsterdam Engine 9-1” “We’re clear of Churchill Rd and returning to station” “Amsterdam Engine 9-1 clear and available, 20:14”

22 Remember…  Be clear  Be direct  Be calm  Be on the right channel  Be listening  Be SAFE!


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