Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

August 30, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Ellen O’Donnell, Cheryl Covell, and Dr. Heather Sheridan-Thomas TST BOCES Network Team Teacher Observation Training.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "August 30, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Ellen O’Donnell, Cheryl Covell, and Dr. Heather Sheridan-Thomas TST BOCES Network Team Teacher Observation Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 August 30, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Ellen O’Donnell, Cheryl Covell, and Dr. Heather Sheridan-Thomas TST BOCES Network Team Teacher Observation Training Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

2

3 Workshop Objectives Day 1 Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

4 RTTT – Improving Instruction for All Students Standards and Assessments Common Core Learning Standards Revised assessments in 2012-2013 Data Systems NYS Data Portal Development Data-driven Instruction/ Inquiry Teams Great Teachers and Leaders Teacher Performance Evaluation Principal Performance Evaluation Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

5 NYS Teacher Evaluation Road Map Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

6

7

8

9

10 How will Teachers and Principals be evaluated?

11 Other 60 points? The regulations require that at least 40 out of the 60 points is to be based on multiple classroom observations—meaning 2 or more—by a principal or other trained administrator. Classroom observations may be performed in person or by video. In addition, teachers may be observed by trained independent evaluators or in-school peers.

12 Other 60 points? The remaining points of the 60 points can be based on a combination of any of the following criteria: structured review of student work; teacher artifacts using portfolio or evidence binder processes; feedback from students, parents, and/or other teachers using structured survey tools; teacher self-reflection and progress on professional growth goals (maximum of 5 points).

13 Focus on Shared Understandings of the Rubrics and Sharpening Evaluation Skills Today’s focus is on understanding the common underpinnings of two rubrics that will be used regionally, and their connection to the NYS Teaching Standards, as well as unpacking the rubric criteria and beginning to practice the collection of observational evidence related to those criteria. We will maintain a “Parking Lot” for questions related to APPR regulations. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

14 Highly Effective Instruction Imagine you are in the classroom of a highly effective teacher: What would you see? What would you hear? What would the students be doing or saying? Individually, write one idea per post-it note. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

15 Highly Effective Instruction At your table, group your sticky notes into bigger categories that define high quality teaching and learning. Go with your table group to one of the Teaching Standards charts on the wall. Group your sticky notes by Standard. Talk about the degree to which this did or did not require re-grouping. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

16 Teaching Standards: NYSUT Rubric Standard 1: Knowledge of Students & Student Learning Standard 2: Knowledge of Content and Instructional Planning Standard 3: Instructional Practice Standard 4: The Learning Environment Standard 5: Assessment for Student Learning Standard 6: Professional Responsibilities Standard 7: Professional Growth Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

17 Indicators With rubrics NYSUT Rubric Vocabulary Knowledge of Students & Student Learning Element 1.1 Demonstrate knowledge of child and adolescent development including cognitive, language, social, emotional, and physical developmental levels. A) Describes developmental characteristics of students Knowledge of Students & Student Learning Element 1.1 Demonstrate knowledge of child and adolescent development including cognitive, language, social, emotional, and physical developmental levels. A) Describes developmental characteristics of students Standards Summary statements Elements 17 Developed by TLS, Inc. NYSUT Rubrics

18 Teaching Framework Domain 3: Instruction Domain 1: Planning and PreparationDomain 2: The Classroom Environment Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

19 Elements With rubrics Framework Vocabulary Standard 1: Planning and Preparation Component 1a. Demonstrating knowledge of content and pedagogy A) Knowledge of content and structure of the discipline B) Knowledge of prerequisite relationships C) Knowledge of content-related pedagogy Standard 1: Planning and Preparation Component 1a. Demonstrating knowledge of content and pedagogy A) Knowledge of content and structure of the discipline B) Knowledge of prerequisite relationships C) Knowledge of content-related pedagogy Domains Components Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

20 Crosswalk between the NYSED Teaching Standards and the ASCD Framework for Teaching Rubrics Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics - ASCD NYSED Teaching StandardsFFT Rubrics Standard 1:Knowledge of Students and Student Learning Elements 1.1-1.6 Domain I: Planning and Preparation Component 1B: Knowledge of Students Standard 2: Knowledge of Content and Instructional Planning Elements 2.1-2.6 Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Components: 1A, 1C – 1F Standard 3: Instructional Practice Elements 3.1-3.6 Domain 3: Instruction Components: 3A-3E Standard 4: Learning Environment Elements 4.1-4.4 Domain 2: Classroom Environment Components 2A-2E Standard 5: Assessment for Student Learning Elements 5.1-5.5 Domains 1, 3, 4, Components 1F, 3D Standard 6: Professional Responsibilities and Collaboration Elements 6.1-6.5 Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Components 4B, 4C, 4F Standard 7: Professional Growth Elements 7.1-7.4 Domain 4: Professional Growth Components 4A, 4D, 4E

21 Common Themes of Both Rubrics Equity Cultural competence High expectations Developmental appropriateness A focus on individuals, including those with special needs Appropriate use of technology Student assumption of responsibility Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

22 Exploring the Priorities of the Rubrics Observing with a Focus on the Priorities 22 Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

23 Priorities of the Rubrics Cognitive Engagement Constructivist Learning 21 st Century Skills The LEARNING is done by the LEARNER ! Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

24 Priorities of the Rubrics Cognitive Engagement “Effective” = students must be cognitively engaged “Highly Effective” = cognition, meta-cognition, and student ownership of their learning Constructivist Learning Effective and Highly Effective practice must have evidence of learning experiences designed to facilitate students’ construction of knowledge. 21 st Century Skills Effective and Highly Effective practice must plan for and have evidence of application of college career-readiness skills and dispositions Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD 24

25 Building Understanding of the Priorities – Text jigsaw At your table, each person should choose one of the 4 articles, being sure that all 4 are covered. 1. Conley, D. (2011). “Building on the Common Core.” Educational Leadership. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. (pages 16-20) 2. An excerpt from: Tharp, R. G., P. Estrada, S. S. Dalton, and L. A. Yamauchi. (2000). Teaching Transformed. Achieving Excellence, Fairness, Inclusion, and Harmony. Boulder, CO: Westview Press (Pages 30-31) 2.“TST BOCES 21 st Century Learning Focus Areas (Draft)” (2011). TST BOCES 21 st Century Learning Task Force ( Task Force of the IPC) 3. Excerpts from: Donald G. Hackmann. 2004. “Constructivism and Block Scheduling. Making the Connection.” Phi Delta Kappan : 697-702, May ; and “Constructivist Processes and Education” From William F. Brewer, on-line at Education Encyclopedia, Learning Theory: Constructivist Approaches. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

26 Building Understanding of the Priorities – Text jigsaw After everyone has read their article, discuss how these articles enhance your understandings of cognitive engagement, constructivist learning, and 21 st century skills, as well as the connections to current initiatives. Be prepared to share ONE idea per table about how your understanding of one of the priorities was enhanced. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

27 Instruction- Activity Read the Rubric Component that has been assigned to your group. As a group, discuss the following, taking notes on the provided chart paper: – Summarize the concepts within your rubric and how it supports cognitive engagement and constructivist learning. – List in two columns what students would be doing that demonstrates evidence of cognitive engagement and constructivist learning and how teachers would be supporting them. 27

28 Instruction- Gallery Walk Walk around and look at your colleagues’ charts of each instructional component. During your walk, add sticky note comments to at least TWO of the charts. You might comment on: the kinds of activities students are engaged in – how prevalent are they? Do they seem like they would prepare students to be “college & career ready”? the type of activities teachers are engaged in – how often do you observe these activities? Any other thoughts you have. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

29 Engagement in Action Video observation: Observe what students are doing that shows evidence of cognitive engagement, constructing meaning, and/or engaging in 21 st century skills. Collect evidence from the video; be prepared to share your evidence. 29 Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

30 Video Debrief & Reflection Share with a partner: What evidence did you see in the video of cognitive engagement, constructivist learning, or 21 st century skills? Write for about 5 minutes on the following topic: In what ways are the priorities we discussed this morning a “shift”? Do what degree will they be a shift for the teachers in your building? What are your beginning thoughts on how to share information about these shifts with teachers? Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

31 Unsatisfactory / Ineffective – Teaching shows evidence of not understanding the concepts underlying the component - may represent practice that is harmful - requires intervention Basic / Developing – Teaching shows evidence of knowledge and skills related to teaching - but inconsistent performance Levels of Performance

32 Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD Proficient / Effective - Teaching shows evidence of thorough knowledge of all aspects of the profession. Students are engaged in learning. This is successful, accomplished, professional, and effective teaching. Distinguished / Highly Effective – Classroom functions as a community of learners with student assumption of responsibility for learning. Levels of Performance

33 Levels of Performance and Student Achievement – Research Research Findings from Cincinnati (National Bureau of Economic Research, 2010) Teachers have substantial effect on student achievement Correlation between FFT based evaluation and student achievement Evaluation using the FFT found: – Unsatisfactory and Basic: students had lower gains than expected – Proficient: students made expected gains – Distinguished: students made positive, and greater than expected gains http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_ id= 1565963 Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

34 Reviewing the Levels of Performance Read the descriptors for Component 3c or Standard 3e of your chosen rubric Highlight the verbs / phrases that distinguish the differences among the levels of performance Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

35 Observing and Evaluating Practice 35

36 Teacher Evaluation - Purposes Why do we evaluate teachers? Brainstorm briefly at your table. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

37 Teacher Evaluation - Purposes Quality Assurance Professional Learning – Improving teacher quality Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

38 Teacher Evaluation Discuss at your table and be prepared to share one idea per table: Why hasn’t teacher evaluation traditionally resulted in professional growth? What conditions support professional growth and how can teacher evaluation be accomplished in a way to meet those conditions? Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

39 Three “Gates” for Effective Teacher Evaluation Fairness Reliability Validity Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

40 Best Practices in Evaluation Basis for evaluation Quality of work – rubric criteria Student progress State Assessment Benchmark assessments Common assessments Teacher- made assessments Plan for gathering data Processes and procedures for gathering information about quality of work Procedures for gathering information about student progress End result Student learning Teacher rating Direction for professional growth Determination of employment Compensation Career ladder Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

41 Best Practices in Observing Basis for observation– Knowledge of the criteria Observers must understand the Criteria Observers must have a focus on constructing meaning through cognitive engagement Observers must be able to identify appropriate data (evidence) to paint an accurate picture of educators’ work Plan for gathering data – Fidelity to process and procedures Observer must understand the process including it’s intent or purpose. Observer must follow process with fidelity, engaging the educator in discussion along the way Observer must maintain consistency and fairness from educator to educator End result – Quality of the product Observer must align evidence to appropriate component Observer must level evidence accurately Observer must have sufficient evidence to support rating Observer must have skill in engaging educator in conversation around level and direction for future Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

42

43 Evidence or Inference/Opinion Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

44 Evidence Evidence is a factual reporting of events. It may include teacher and student actions and/or behaviors. It may also include artifacts prepared by the teacher, students, or others. It is not clouded with personal opinion or biases. It is selected using professional judgment by the observer and / or the teacher. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

45 Types of Observation Evidence Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments: “Bring your white boards, markers and erasers to the carpet and sit on your square.” Non-evaluative statements of observed teacher or student behavior : Teacher presented the content from the front of room. Numeric information about time, student participation, resource use, etc.: [9:14 – 9:29] Warm-up. 8 of 22 Ss finished at 9:20, sat still until 9:29 An observed aspect of the environment: Desks were arranged in groups of four with room to walk between each group. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

46 Evidence vs. Inference/Opinion… Read evidence statement you wrote as you watched the earlier video. Decide – is it evidence or inference/opinion? Discuss your answer with your elbow partner. If you agree that the statement is an inference or opinion, reword the statement so that it is an evidence statement. Be prepared to discuss statements about which you have questions. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

47 What is Evidence? - Review Actions, by teacher or students Statements or questions, by teacher or students Observable features of the classroom Review the evidence collected previously – is it evidence? Or opinion? Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

48 Bias Definition: Attaching positive or negative meaning to elements in our environment based on personal or societal influences that shape our thinking. A biased judgment is based on outside influences and is not necessarily related to a teacher’s effectiveness. Example: “Mrs. T does so much for the school, she is an excellent teacher. “ The actual classroom evidence may not support the rating of the teacher as “excellent.” Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

49 Individual Professional Bias Reflection: Make your own personal list of biases to be aware of when you assess teaching performance. Determine if the bias leads you to assign a higher or lower rating when evaluating teacher performance, and write a + or – next to each statement. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

50 The Evidence Cycle Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD COLLECT DATA (Evidence) SORT TO ALIGN WITH YOUR FRAMEWORK Interpret: Clarify Conclusions NO!

51 1 st Observation Practice INSTRUCTION Priorities of the rubrics Cognitive Engagement Constructivist Learning 21 st Century Skills Review: What type of evidence must you collect to assess the priorities of the rubrics? Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

52 Observing Practice Observe the video Collect evidence of Domain 3: Instruction/ Standard 3: Instructional Practice Be prepared to share your evidence Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

53 Checking Evidence Use the self-check questions to review your evidence collection Have I recorded only facts? Is my evidence relevant to the criteria being examined? Whenever possible, have I quantified words such as few, some, and most? Have I used quotation marks when quoting a teacher or student? Does my selection or documentation of evidence indicate any personal or professional preferences? Have I included any opinion (in the guise of fact)? Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

54 Observing Practice: Sorting Evidence With a partner, sort your evidence so that it aligns with the appropriate criteria in your rubric for instruction Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

55 Observing Practice: Clarifying Questions With your partner, develop questions you have about the lesson you observed that must be answered before you rate the teacher’s performance? We will come back to your questions after the next segment of Table Talk. Be prepared to share one or two of your questions at that time. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

56 The Complexity of Teaching “After 30 years of doing such work, I have concluded that classroom teaching … is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented...The only time a physician could possibly encounter a situation of comparable complexity would be in the emergency room of a hospital during or after a natural disaster.” Lee Shulman, The Wisdom of Practice Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

57 A Culture of Professional Inquiry Professional learning never ends. It is every teacher’s responsibility to engage in professional development. Teaching is so complex that it is never done perfectly. Every educator can always become more skilled. Making a commitment to do so is part of the essential work of teaching. Charlotte Danielson The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

58 A Culture of Professional Inquiry Should: Infuse a school’s practices related to professional development; Be reflected in the school’s practices surrounding mentoring and teacher evaluation; and Regard mentoring and evaluation as ongoing learning. Charlotte Danielson The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

59 Teacher Evaluation… “Teacher evaluation can be an opportunity for genuine professional learning. When organized around clearly established and accepted standards of practice, teacher evaluation offers an opportunity for educators to reflect seriously on their practice, and promote learning.” Charlotte Danielson The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

60 Table Talk Discuss the content of the previous 4 slides with your colleagues. What cultural and structural conditions must be in place to create and sustain a climate of professional inquiry? In what ways does the type of questions observers ask of teachers promote – or inhibit – such a climate? Be prepared to share your discussion. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

61 Question Review Return to the questions you and your partner created after observing the lesson Reframe your questions to ensure that they are designed to promote a climate of professional inquiry Consider the following: How does the question make you feel? How might the teacher respond to the question? Revise your questions as necessary. Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

62 Workshop Objectives Day 1 Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD

63 Debrief and Closure Next steps – Future sessions at BOCES In your districts? Got It/Want It/Questions Please remember to complete the workshop evaluation Thank you for your participation! Developed by Teaching Learning Solutions, Inc. FFT Rubrics-ASCD


Download ppt "August 30, 2011 facilitated by Dr. Ellen O’Donnell, Cheryl Covell, and Dr. Heather Sheridan-Thomas TST BOCES Network Team Teacher Observation Training."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google