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Presentation on theme: "NIET Teacher Evaluation Process © 2011 National Institute for Excellence in Teaching. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate without permission."— Presentation transcript:

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2 NIET Teacher Evaluation Process © 2011 National Institute for Excellence in Teaching. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate without permission.

3 Participant Expectations When first introduced to the NIET Evaluation System Rubric, it is not expected that individuals will be able to begin immediately utilizing this multi- dimensional observational tool for feedback and growth at a conceptual level of application. When first introduced to the NIET Evaluation System Rubric, it is not expected that individuals will be able to begin immediately utilizing this multi- dimensional observational tool for feedback and growth at a conceptual level of application.

4 In order to fully understand and utilize this tool effectively, each person has to develop his/her skills in a classroom setting. Understanding and expertise will only be increased through exposure, engagement and practice. The following activities will serve as an initial introduction to this tool.

5 AgendaAgenda Overview of the TEAM Evaluation Process—15 minutes Overview of the TEAM Evaluation Process—15 minutes Placemat Consensus—40 minutes Placemat Consensus—40 minutes Get to know the rubric—30 minutes Get to know the rubric—30 minutes Highlighting Activity—25 minutes Highlighting Activity—25 minutes Break—10 minutes Break—10 minutes Watch a Lesson Watch a Lesson What are possible areas of Reinforcement and Refinement?— 10 minutes What are possible areas of Reinforcement and Refinement?— 10 minutes Portal Overview—15 minutes Portal Overview—15 minutes

6 TEAM Evaluation Multiple Measures

7 Overview of Evaluation Process— Professional Teachers

8 Overview of Evaluation Process—Apprentice Teachers

9 For Logistic Questions about TEAM As questions come up, please use the “parking lot” at the back of the room. As questions come up, please use the “parking lot” at the back of the room. We will review all the questions you may have about this process at the end of the day. We will review all the questions you may have about this process at the end of the day.

10 Objectives:Objectives: The participants will: The participants will: – Develop a procedural knowledge and understanding of the Evaluation Rubrics and begin to move to a conceptual understanding. – Begin to think about how these concepts apply to their own practice.

11 Research Supporting Instructionally Focused Accountability The challenge of creating an effective teacher accountability system is to improve the quality of teacher instruction, and thereby raise student achievement. The challenge of creating an effective teacher accountability system is to improve the quality of teacher instruction, and thereby raise student achievement. States and school districts need to identify the knowledge and skills that a teacher needs to teach successfully, and then create standards and rubrics to measure teaching performance. Odden, Milanowski & Youngs Odden and Clune States and school districts need to identify the knowledge and skills that a teacher needs to teach successfully, and then create standards and rubrics to measure teaching performance. Odden, Milanowski & Youngs Odden and Clune

12 Where did the NIET rubric come from? Our rubric is based on research and best practices from multiple sources. In addition to the research from Charlotte Danielson and other prominent researchers, NIET reviewed instructional guidelines and standards developed by numerous national and state teacher standards organizations. From this information we developed our comprehensive set of standards for teacher accountability. The work reviewed included guidelines and standards developed by: The Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) The Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) The National Board for Professional Teacher Standards The National Board for Professional Teacher Standards Massachusetts' Principles for Effective Teaching Massachusetts' Principles for Effective Teaching California's Standards for the Teaching Profession California's Standards for the Teaching Profession Connecticut's Beginning Educator Support Program, and Connecticut's Beginning Educator Support Program, and The New Teacher Center's Developmental Continuum of Teacher Abilities. The New Teacher Center's Developmental Continuum of Teacher Abilities.

13 Why the NIET rubric? – Additionally, the NIET rubrics and evaluation process have been shown to be correlated to student achievement at a statistically significant level in two separate studies. Note the correlation studies by Schacter & Thum, 2004 and Daley & Kim in Note the correlation studies by Schacter & Thum, 2004 and Daley & Kim in In both of these studies, teachers who scored higher on the TAP Teaching Standards tended to have higher student achievement gains. Conversely, teachers who scored lower, tended to have lower student achievement gains. In both of these studies, teachers who scored higher on the TAP Teaching Standards tended to have higher student achievement gains. Conversely, teachers who scored lower, tended to have lower student achievement gains.

14 When you think of a lesson you deem to be effective, what were all the elements that led you to that decision? Consensus Elements Elements of an Effective Lesson Placemat Consensus

15 Consensus Elements When you think of a lesson you deem to be effective, what were all the elements that led you to that decision? 2 minutes to write individually 3 minutes to talk and reach consensus 5 minutes to debrief Participant A Participant B Participant D Participant C Placemat Consensus

16 When you think of a lesson you deem to be effective, what were all the elements that led you to that decision ? 2 minutes to write individually Consensus Elements Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Elements of an Effective Lesson Placemat Consensus

17 Consensus Elements When you think of a lesson you deem to be effective, what were all the elements that led you to that decision? 3 minutes to talk and reach consensus Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Elements of an Effective Lesson Placemat Consensus

18 5 minutes to debrief Consensus Elements When you think of a lesson you deem to be effective, what were all the elements that led you to that decision? Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Elements of an Effective Lesson Placemat Consensus

19 Consensus Elements When you think of a lesson you deem to be effective, what were all the elements that led you to that decision?  Why this question?  Why this process? Elements of an Effective Lesson Placemat Consensus

20 Whole School Consensus Now that each group has come up with their own consensus, lets take a moment to make a whole school consensus Now that each group has come up with their own consensus, lets take a moment to make a whole school consensus What is it that we would expect to see in a classroom that is deemed “effective”? What is it that we would expect to see in a classroom that is deemed “effective”?

21 Effective Elements Summary Defined learning goal that is clearly communicated to students Defined learning goal that is clearly communicated to students Student engagement and interaction Student engagement and interaction Alignment of activities and materials throughout lesson Alignment of activities and materials throughout lesson Student relevancy Student relevancy Numerous checks for mastery Numerous checks for mastery Differentiation Differentiation

22 NIET Rubric NIET has defined a set of professional indicators, known as the Instructional Rubrics, to measure teaching skills and knowledgeof the teachers in a school.

23 The Parts of the Rubric The Parts of the Rubric Domains

24 The Parts of the Rubric The Parts of the Rubric Domains Indicators

25 The Parts of the Rubric The Parts of the Rubric Domains Indicators Descriptors

26 The Parts of the Rubric The Parts of the Rubric Domains Indicators Descriptors Performance Levels

27 Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM)* (*modified from the TAP Teaching Performance Standards) Instructional Plans Student Work Assessment Managing Student Behavior Expectations Environment Respectful Culture Staff Development Instructional Supervision School Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Standards & Objectives Motivating Students Presenting Instructional Content Lesson Structure & Pacing Activities & Materials Questioning Academic Feedback Grouping Students Teacher Content Knowledge Teacher Knowledge of Students Thinking Problem Solving Planning Instruction Professionalism Environment Review of Previous Learning

28 Directions: Administrator/Trainer will model metacognition for Standards & Objectives. Administrator/Trainer will model metacognition for Standards & Objectives. Highlight key words from the descriptors under the “At Expectations” column for Motivating Students, Presenting Instructional Content, Activities and Materials, Questioning, Academic Feedback, and Grouping Students with your shoulder partner. Highlight key words from the descriptors under the “At Expectations” column for Motivating Students, Presenting Instructional Content, Activities and Materials, Questioning, Academic Feedback, and Grouping Students with your shoulder partner. Rubric Activity Rubric Activity

29 What is the Process of Modeling Your Thinking (Think-Aloud) I do Think Aloud You do Students Explain Thinking We do Scaffold & Cue

30 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear. Expectations for student performance are clear. Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed.

31 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed. Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide

32 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide

33 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide

34 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear. Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide

35 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide

36 Standards & Objectives  All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated. All learning objectives and state content standards are explicitly communicated.  Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are aligned and logically sequenced to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines. Learning objectives are: (a) consistently connected to what students have previously learned, (b) know from life experiences, and (c) integrated with other disciplines.  Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high. Expectations for student performance are clear, demanding, and high.  State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson. State standards are displayed and referenced throughout the lesson.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Most learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are mostly aligned to the lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are connected to what students have previously learned  Expectations for student performance are clear.  State standards are displayed.  There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that most students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated. Few learning objectives and state content standards are communicated.  Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective. Sub-objectives are inconsistently aligned to he lesson’s major objective.  Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned. Learning objectives are rarely connected to what students have previously learned.  Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague. Expectations for student performance are vague.  There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective. There is evidence that few students demonstrate mastery of the objective.  State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. State standards are displayed. Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide Click for Next Slide

37 Rubric Activity Rubric Activity Directions: Trainer/administrator will model metacognition for Standards & Objectives. Highlight key words from the descriptors under the “At Expectations” column with a shoulder partner for Motivating Students, Presenting Instructional Content, Activities and Materials, and Questioning Continue highlighting key words from the descriptors under the “At Expectations” column individually for Academic Feedback, Lesson Structure and Pacing, Teacher Content Knowledge, Teacher Knowledge of Students, Thinking, and Problem Solving individually. Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Click for an activity for early finishers. Click for an activity for early finishers. Click for an activity for early finishers. Click for an activity for early finishers.

38 For early finishers… If you finish early, begin making explicit connections between the key words that you have highlighted and actual classroom practices. If you finish early, begin making explicit connections between the key words that you have highlighted and actual classroom practices. What would some of these descriptors and key words look like in a classroom observation? What would some of these descriptors and key words look like in a classroom observation? Write down the applications that you have made for each of the key words that you highlighted and be prepared to share those when the trainer asks for them. Write down the applications that you have made for each of the key words that you highlighted and be prepared to share those when the trainer asks for them.

39 Look Back at Your Consensus Maps… Find the parts of the rubric that correspond to your consensus maps. Find the parts of the rubric that correspond to your consensus maps. For example—If you put “there needs to be an objective,” where in the rubric would that be found? For example—If you put “there needs to be an objective,” where in the rubric would that be found?

40 Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start Click to Start 10 Minute Break

41 The Break Has Ended

42 Watch a Lesson We will now watch a lesson and apply some of the learning that we have had so far about the rubric. We will now watch a lesson and apply some of the learning that we have had so far about the rubric. After watching the lesson, you will be asked to decide upon an indicator that the teacher was relatively strong in, and an indicator that the teacher could improve. After watching the lesson, you will be asked to decide upon an indicator that the teacher was relatively strong in, and an indicator that the teacher could improve. In order to decide upon these areas, you will need to take notes during the lesson as evidence of your decision. In order to decide upon these areas, you will need to take notes during the lesson as evidence of your decision.

43 Collecting Evidence is Essential Detailed Collection of Evidence: Detailed Collection of Evidence: Unbiased notes of what occurs during a classroom lesson. Capture: Capture: what the teacher says what the teacher says what the teacher does what the teacher does what the students say what the students say what the students do what the students do Copy wording from visuals used during the lesson. Copy wording from visuals used during the lesson. Record time segments of lesson. Record time segments of lesson. The collection of detailed evidence is ESSENTIAL for the evaluation process to be implemented accurately, fairly, and for the intended purpose of the process.

44 Watch a Lesson Please take notes as you watch.

45 How would you Reinforce and Refine this teacher’s practice? Every full-length evaluation comes with an area that the teacher did relatively effectively, and an area where the teachers practice could improve. Every full-length evaluation comes with an area that the teacher did relatively effectively, and an area where the teachers practice could improve. – Reinforcement= area of relative strength – Refinement= are of relative weakness With a shoulder partner, look at your notes, and pick an indicator for the reinforcement and refinement. With a shoulder partner, look at your notes, and pick an indicator for the reinforcement and refinement. Why did you choose each area? What evidence do you have from the lesson? Why did you choose each area? What evidence do you have from the lesson?

46 Procedural Understanding vs. Conceptual Understanding Thorough understanding/ independence Conceptual Knowledge Procedural Knowledge Beginning of understanding

47 National Raters Scores See how educators who have applied this rubric to their own practice and to others would have categorized and scored this lesson

48 Training Portal: Evaluation Process

49 Training Modules

50 Video Library

51 TEAM Logistics Q & A What questions do you have about the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM)? What questions do you have about the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM)?


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