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SUICIDE PREVENTION SYMPOSIUM Mental Health & Assessment Services Division of Student Services Denver Public Schools June 4-5 th 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "SUICIDE PREVENTION SYMPOSIUM Mental Health & Assessment Services Division of Student Services Denver Public Schools June 4-5 th 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 SUICIDE PREVENTION SYMPOSIUM Mental Health & Assessment Services Division of Student Services Denver Public Schools June 4-5 th 2012

2 Please sign in and sign out Lunch is Provided Payment for $22.11/hour for classified staff in MHA for 7 hours of training on Monday Payment for $22.11/hour for classified staff in MHA for 8 hours of training on Tuesday as we will have a working lunch Welcome

3 Suicide Prevention Symposium Day Two 8:00 Cyberbullying and the Connection with Suicide, Ellen Kelty 10:00 Breakout Session Implementing the SOS Curriculum, Joanna Greiner and Tim Turley More than Sad Training DVDS and Survivor’s Story, South Metro Out of the Darkness, Sherri Cole 11:00 Fire Within Program, Carson J. Spencer Foundation, Sally Spencer-Thomas, CEO and Jess Stohlmann, FIRE Program Director 11:30 Resource Fair/Lunch Lunch sponsored by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention/South Metro Out of the Darkness 12:30 PUT THIS ON THE (MAP), Documentary of LGBTQ youth, 1:30 Breakout Session Culturally Responsive Threat Assessment, Dustin Coleman and Barb Downing Culturally Responsive Suicide Risk Assessment, Joanna Greiner and Ellen Kelty 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 3

4 Gifted, HGT and 2 E Students A greater capacity to be stimulated or respond to stimuli Areas Psychomotor High energy Fast speech, talkative Sensual Seeing, tasting, touching, hearing, Imaginational Intellectual Insatiable curiosity, persistent at problem solving Emotional Intense feelings Dabrowski’s Theory of Overexcitabilities Daniels, Piechowski, Living with Intensity (2009)

5 CYBERBULLYING AND THE CONNECTION WITH SUICIDE Ellen Kelty, MA, NCSP Mental Health and Assessment Services Denver Public Schools June 2012 E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 5 5/2/2015

6 Objectives Participants will gain an understanding of Prevalence of bullying and cyberbullying Dynamics of bullying Types of cyberbullying Current legislation and policy Connection with suicide What schools can do to prevent cyberbullying What parents can do to prevent cyberbullying E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 6 5/2/2015

7 How good are your texting skills? FYA: JTLYK that WNDITWB but kids today don’t speak much F2F or AFK. Unfortunately we need to RTFM! SCNR but I hope it left you LOL. ROFLcopter Adapted from Colorado School Safety Resource Center E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 5/2/2015 7

8 Colorado Bullying Definition, 2010 “Any written or verbal expression, or physical or electronic act or gesture, or a pattern thereof, that is intended to coerce, intimidate, or cause any physical, mental, or emotional harm to any student. Bullying is prohibited against any student for any reason, including but not limited to any such behavior that is directed toward a student on the basis of his or her academic performance; or against whom federal and state laws prohibit discrimination upon any of the bases described in section *” C.R.S (a)(X)(B) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 8 5/2/2015

9 Prevalence of Bullying in Schools 18.8% of high school students reported being bullied on school property (Colorado Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2009) 15-25% of U.S. students report being bullied (“sometimes or more often”) and 15-20% report bullying others “with some frequency (Melton et al., 1998, Nansel el al. 2001) Nationally, 19.9% of students reported being bullied (Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2009) In Colorado, 18.8 % of high school students reported being a victim of bullying (Healthy Kids Survey Colorado Survey, 2009) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 9 5/2/2015

10 Bully Prevention and Equity National data reveals 60% of students ages reported having experienced verbal and physical harassment or assault within a year as a result of “real or perceived race/ethnicity, disability, gender sexual orientation, gender expression, or religion” _for_Bullying_Prevention_A_Report_from_the_Colorad o_Bullying_Prevention_Summit.pdf April 15, 2011 ) _for_Bullying_Prevention_A_Report_from_the_Colorad o_Bullying_Prevention_Summit.pdf April 15, 2011 Over 1.6 million public school students experience bullying due to actual or perceived sexual orientation (Rivers, Duncan and Besag, 2007) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 10 5/2/2015

11 Understanding Bullying The easiest way to understand bullying is through these analogies Sexual Harassment Spouse Abuse All involve imbalance of power Perpetrator blames the victim Victim may blame themselves 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 11

12 Direct Bullying Physical Verbal Non-verbal Hitting, kicking, shoving, spitting… Taunting, teasing, degrading racial or sexual comments Threatening, obscene gestures 12 © The Olweus Bullying Prevention Group, /2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment

13 Indirect Bullying Physical Verbal Non-verbal Getting another person to assault someone Spreading rumors Deliberate exclusion from a group or activity Cyber-bullying 13 © The Olweus Bullying Prevention Group, /2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment

14 14 Bullying is NOT a Conflict a Conflict It is a group phenomenon in which children may play a variety of roles. Bullying is about POWER 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment

15 Bullying vs. Conflict Normal Conflict Bullying Equal power/between friends Imbalance of power/not friends Happens occasionallyRepeated negative actions AccidentalPurposeful Not serious emotional harmSerious, with threat of physical or emotional harm Equal emotional reactionStrong emotional reaction from victim/ little or no reaction from bully Not seeking power or Seeking power/control attention Not trying to get somethingAttempt to gain power/material things Remorse/takes responsibilityNo remorse/blames victim Effort to resolve problemNo effort to solve problem Garrity, C., Jens. K., Porter, W., Sager, N. & Short-Camilli, C. (2004). Bonds.M. & Stoker, S. (2000). 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 15

16 Pair/Share Think of a case of bullying that you have worked on this year Was the race, religion, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation of the student a factor? How did your background and cultural understanding impact your work with this student and their family? 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 16

17 What is Cyberbullying? Any type of harassment or bullying that occurs through , a chat room, instant messaging, a website (including blogs, text messaging,or videos or pictures posted on websites or sent through cell phones) Electronic Media and Youth Violence: A CDC Issue Brief for Researchers U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 17

18 What is Cyberbullying? Brainpop.com BrainPOP creates animated, curriculum-based content that engages students, supports educators, and bolsters achievement BrainPOP Jr. (K-3), BrainPOP, BrainPOP Español, and BrainPOP ESL GameUp™, a collection of top free online game titles that tie right in to curriculum computersandinternet/cyberbullying/ E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 18 5/2/2015

19 How is it different from bullying? Takes place 24/7 - not just during school hours Invades home and personal space as well as the school environment Can be done quickly and on a large scale Can be perceived as anonymous (the bully can set up a fake address or use someone else's mobile, for example) Bystanders can become perpetrators if they pass on s or text/picture messages or take part in an online discussion Can last longer than face-to-face bullying, ometimes building over weeks and months Provides evidence (e.g. s, texts, photos or videos) in a way that other forms of bullying don't Incidents may be unintentional or a "joke” and the perpetrator might not have considered the potential consequences different-to-other-forms-of-bullying.aspx retrieved different-to-other-forms-of-bullying.aspx E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 19 5/2/2015

20 How Prevalent is Cyberbullying? 20% to 35% of children and adolescents experience cyberbullying (Diamanduros,Downs, & Jenkins, 2008; Kowalski & Limber, 2007) 11% of had cyber bullied others at least once (Kowalski and Umber 2007) 11% of elementary school children who had cell phones admitted receiving either a derogatory message or a personal threat (Charlton 2002) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 20 5/2/2015

21 Colorado School Safety Resource Center

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24 Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trangendered, and queer students (LGBTQ) Over 1.6 million public school students experience bullying due to actual or perceived sexual orientation (Rivers, Duncan and Besag, 2007) ¾ of LGBT students hear slurs such as “faggot” or “dyke” frequently at school; 9/10 hear anti-LGBT language frequently (GLSEN 2007 National Survey) The risk of attempting suicide was 2X as high among LGB youth as among heterosexual youth (Russell and Joyner, 2001) LGB high school students were more than 4X as likely as non-LGB students to have attempted suicide (Massachusetts Department of Education, YRBS, 2006) 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 24

25 Increasingly common with kids under 12 “Being mean online” Name-calling or hurtful comments in s, games, or messages Using another child’s passwords to: Deface games or cheat in worlds like Club Penguin Get the other child in trouble with friends or parents Send fake s or instant messages Bridges school and home Kids don’t always connect actions to outcomes Cyberbullies aren’t always kids we’d expect Targets commonly experience sadness, social anxiety, or acting out Used with permission from Brian Dino, DPS 2012 Cyberbullying in Elementary School 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 25

26 Club Penguin Disney’s Virtual world where children play games and interact with friends in the guise of colorful penguin avatars Ages 6 to 14 Chat, send greeting cards, use emotes Attend parties and special events, Take on a role in the latest stage play Adopt and care for a cute and cuddly puffle pet Play games to earn coins which can be used to design the perfect igloo 1.jpg E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 26 5/2/2015

27 Most Common Age “Being mean online” or “digital drama” Examples of cyberbullying behavior: – Publicly sharing messages or images meant to be private – sometimes “sexting” – Repeatedly sending hurtful, or threatening messages – Spreading rumors, lies, or embarrassing stories – Posting cruel comments on the Internet – Setting up fake social networking pages to make fun of targets Social pressure often motivates behavior Targets commonly experience sadness, social anxiety, or acting out Crosses-over between school and home Used with permission from Brian Dino, DPS 2012 Cyberbullying in Middle School 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 27

28 “Digital cruelty,” “digital abuse,” or “causing drama” online Examples of cyberbullying behavior: Publicly sharing messages or images meant to be private – sometimes “sexting” Repeatedly sending hurtful, harassing, or threatening messages Spreading rumors, lies, or embarrassing stories Posting cruel comments on the Internet Setting up fake social networking pages to make fun of targets Social pressure often motivates behavior Cyberbullies aren’t always the kids we’d expect More public, permanent, and inescapable than traditional school yard bullying Targets commonly experience sadness, social anxiety, or acting out Crosses-over between school and home Used with permission from Brian Dino, DPS 2012 Cyberbullying in High School 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 28

29 Slam Pages Juicy Campus Gossip, rumors, and rants related to colleges and universities Facebook Wanna slam someone? Do it here! Feel like talking *&&^% You've come to the right place. E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 29 5/2/2015

30 Forms of Cyberbullying Quiz E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 30 5/2/2015

31 Common Forms of Cyberbullying Exclusion A specific and intentional attempt to exclude a person from an online group Harassment Repeatedly sending a person offensive messages Cyberstalking Highly intimidating harassment that includes threats of harm Denigration Sending/posting harmful, untrue or cruel statements or photographs E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 31 5/2/2015

32 Common Forms of Cyberbullying (cont.) Flaming Sending/posting angry, rude or vulgar messages Impersonation/Masquerading Breaking into an account and sending vicious or embarrassing material to others, alter their Facebook profile, posing as the person and embarrassing them Outing or Trickery Tricking someone to solicit embarrassing information and then making it public Griefing Teasing and taunting other players on MMOG gaming si tes E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 32 5/2/2015

33 Electronic Date Violence "It's the phenomenon of no place to run and no place to hide. Now, you can be stalked electronically. You can't even see your predator coming." – Kevin Jennings, Assistant Deputy Secretary US Department of Education 10.4% of boys and 9.8% of girls said they received a threatening cell phone message from their romantic partner (Hinduja,S & Patchin, J. W. Cyberbullying Research Center 2011) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 33 5/2/2015

34 Electronic Date Violence Using electronic means to harm a romantic partner Checking up on a partner repeatedly Preventing a partner from using the internet or cell phone Making fun of a partner online Harassing a partner for refusing to be sexually Posting humiliating or harassing photo Threatening E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 34 5/2/2015

35 Pair/Share Think of a case of cyberbullying that you have worked on this year. How long did the bullying go on before the school staff were made aware of the case? Did the student have a special education disability that might have made the student more likely to be a target of cyberbullying? Does your school have a comprehensive bully prevention program in place? 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 35

36 Can Sexting be a Form of Cyberbullying? Sexting: the act of sending sexually explicit messages or photographs, primarily between mobile phones Can be a form of cyberbullying when images are used to bully 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 36

37 Sexting and Colorado Law Sexual exploitation of children Class 3 felony for distributing or production Class 4 or class 6 felony depending on the amount possessed Promotion of Obscenity of a Minor Class 6 felony if knowing the content, one promotes or possesses material with intent to promote to a minor, any obscene material Unlawful Sexual Contact Any person who knowingly observes or takes photos of another’s intimate parts without that person’s consent in a situation where the person observed has a reasonable expectation of privacy. Used with permission CSSRC, 2012 E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment5/2/

38 What to Tell Students About Sexting:  Receiving the photos is NOT a crime.  KEEPING them and SENDING them IS a crime.  Do Not Respond Back & DO Report it to an adult immediately (you can show the adult the message on your phone but DON’T send it!  ) parent, school official, police officer or sheriff.  Used with permission CSSRS, 2012 E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment5/2/

39 Does Bullying Cause Suicide? Chance of suicide increases when these factors occur at same time Biological Factors Risk Factors Warning Signs plus Immediate Trigger or Crisis Association of Suicidology, School Suicide Prevention Accreditation Resource Guide 2009 Bullying can be a trigger or a contributing factor E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 39 5/2/2015

40 What is the Connection between Bullying and Suicide? Studies and high profile cases have demonstrated a link Strong relationships have been shown between bullying, depression and suicide Cyberbullying victims were 1.9 times more likely and cyberbullying offenders were 1.5 times more likely to have attempted suicide than those who were not cyberbullying victims or offenders S. & Patchin, J. W. (2010). Bullying, Cyberbullying, and Suicide. Archives of Suicide Research, 14(3), 206 ‐ 221 E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 40 5/2/2015

41 Megan Meier A 13-year-old girl committed suicide on October 15, 2006 after being cyberbullyed by an adult neighbor masquerading as a teenage boy on MySpace Meier received a message supposedly from a 16-year-old boy, “Josh Evans”, but actually sent by Lori Drew using a fabricated account “Josh” befriend Megan then later harassed her and used flaming and denigration United States v. Lori Drew Lori Drew was convicted and then subsequently acquitted of violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 41 5/2/2015

42 LGBTQ youth who have died by suicide after bullying or cyberbullying Seth Walsh September 19, 2010 age 13 Resulted in Seth’s Law AB goes into effect July 2012 Tyler Clementi September 2010 age 18 Asher Brown September 2010 age 13 Raymond Chase October 2010 age 19 Haylee Fentress and Paige Morovetz April 2011 both age 14 Bullied about their relationship Jamey Rodemeyer September 2011 age 14 Jaimie Hubley October 2011 age 15 in Canada Eric James Boges January 2012 age 19 Had made a “It Get’s Better Video” 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 42

43 Tyler Clementi College student at Rutgers University Died Sept 2010 Roommate, Dharun Ravi used a webcam to stream —of live video of roommate Tyler Clementi and another man kissing, and told others they could watch another encounter two days later Clementi jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge In March, a jury found Ravi guilty of 15 criminal charges, including invasion of privacy and bias intimidation He was sentenced to thirty days in jail Resulted in New Jersey Anti-bullying Bill of Rights E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 43 5/2/2015

44 To raise awareness of the issues surrounding and support organizations concerned with suicide prevention, acceptance of LGBT teens, and education against internet cyber bullying Goals: To promote acceptance of LGBT teens and others marginalized by society Provide education against all forms of bullying including cyber bullying over the internet Promote research and development into the causes and prevention of teenage suicide E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 44 5/2/2015

45 SRAS and Bullying/Cyberbullying Stand up if you have worked on a suicide risk assessment this year in which the student reported cyberbullying was a factor Share at your table how your SRA Safety Plan addressed these concerns for this student 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 45

46 HB : Anti-Bullying Legislation Colorado is one of 47 States to pass legislation aimed at reducing bullying and harassment Defines Bullying Anti-bullying comprehensive policies required for each school district Grant Program 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 46

47 Discrimination is on the basis of race, color, or national origin (Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964) Discrimination is on the basis of sex (Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972) Discrimination is on the basis of a disability (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990) When is Bullying a Civil Rights Violation? 47 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment

48 Steps to Respond to Civil Rights Violations Investigate the incident If an investigation reveals that discriminatory harassment has occurred, a school must take prompt and effective steps reasonably calculated to end the harassment, including Title IX paperwork Eliminate any hostile environment and its effects Prevent the harassment from recurring E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 48 5/2/2015

49 DPS Bullying Prevention and Education Policy JICDE Consequences A student who engages in any act of bullying is subject to appropriate disciplinary action in accordance with District Policy JK and JK-R pertaining to discipline procedures and may include suspension, expulsion and/or referral to law enforcement authorities. The severity and pattern, if any, of the bullying shall be taken into consideration when disciplinary decisions are made. 49 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment

50 Revision of JK-R for Fall 2012 To Ensure alignment with HB All policies with reference to bullying/harassment/discrimination are being updated To specifically include electronic communications, online postings, text messages, photos, and videos as examples of conduct that could be bullying/harassment/discrimination These trigger not only our obligations to investigate but also our option to impose discipline under JK-R E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 50 5/2/2015

51 DPS discipline policy on cyberbullying A student who engages in any act of bullying is subject to appropriate disciplinary action in accordance with District Policy JK and JK-R pertaining to discipline procedures and may include suspension, expulsion and/or referral to law enforcement authorities. The severity and pattern, if any, of the bullying shall be taken into consideration when disciplinary decisions are made. Where does cyberbullying fall on the discipline matrix and ladder? E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 51 5/2/2015

52 Where does cyberbullying on the discipline ladder/matrix? Level I is a Type Two offense that carries a consequence of up to three days is-school suspension Level II is a Type Three offense that carries a consequence of up to three days in-school suspension or 1 day in and 1 day out The difference between Bullying: Level I and II is severity and/or pattern More severe bullying is a Type Four or Five offense and leaves the Bullying label behind for more serious descriptors as: harassment, fighting, unlawful sexual behavior, other student behavior that presents an active or ongoing danger to the welfare or safety of school occupants. E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 52 5/2/2015

53 School Liability Districts’ are responsible for student safety when at school, on school grounds or attending school function Cyberbullying often occurs off school grounds but then spills into the school day School can address this as a discipline issue when it interferes with the functioning of the school or the student’s opportunity to receive educational benefit When a liability case occurs school staff will be asked What did you know? When did you know about it? What did you do about it? S. Holt and M. Otworth (2012) Cyberbullying when it leaves school grounds, Public Risk E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 53 5/2/2015

54 Lawsuit against NJ School A New Jersey teenager is suing her high school for $1 million for failing to stop cyberbullying She claims she was cyberbullied by fellow students and a parent over a three-year period Filed Feb. 9 in New Jersey Superior Court Seeking $1 million in damages from the school district Seeking an additional $1 million in damages from the other students and the parent Student claims that when she reported the harassment to school authorities, providing copies of the Facebook postings to the dean of students, she was told that "nothing could be done." 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 54

55 Breaking the Code of Silence around Bullying Discuss it Talk about the difference between fun secrets and secrets that can hurt someone Talk about the difference between tattling and telling Use the Signs of Suicide (SOS) steps Acknowledge Care Tell a Trusted Adult E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 55 5/2/2015

56 School Practices to Prevent Cyberbullying Implementation of school wide programs such as PBIS that promote positive school culture Implement bully prevention programs such as Olweus or Stop, Walk and Talk Teach students cybersafety Provide information to teachers and parents on cyberbullying and cybersafety Have Gay Straight Alliances (GSA) Have clear behavioral expectations and rules Closely monitor students’ use of computers Use filtering and tracking software on all computers Train students, staff and parents E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 56 5/2/2015

57 Signs that a Student might be a Victim of Cyberbullying Suddenly stops using the computer Appears nervous, sad or mad after receiving text messages or using the computer Avoids going to school or being around peers Doesn’t want to talk about what they have been doing on the computer Overly sad, angry, or withdrawn 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 57

58 Teach Parents about Cybersafety Check your child’s , texts or social network pages Talk to your child about cyberbullying and sexting Teach your child to tell an adult if they see any signs of cyberbullying Teach your child not to forward any messages that tease or make fun of another person Talk to your teacher or school mental health provider if you suspect your student is being cyberbullied Limit and Monitor internet and text message usage 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 58

59 School Practices to Prevent Cyberbullying Implementation of school wide programs such as PBIS that promote positive school culture Implementation of bully prevention programs such as Olweus or Stop, Walk and Talk Teach students cybersafety Provide information to teachers and parents on cyberbullying and cybersafety Have Gay Straight Alliances (GSA) Have clear behavioral expectations and rules Closely monitor students’ use of computers Use filtering and tracking software on all computers Train students, staff and parents E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 59 5/2/2015

60 Cybersafety for Students Teach students to tell an adult if they are cyberbullied Teach students to tell an adult if they see a message, posting, or image that makes them feel uncomfortable or scared Teach students about the danger of sexting Teach students not to forward text messages that are mean or make fun of another person Use classroom contracts to remind students of expectations for using technology E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 60 5/2/2015

61 Olweus Steps to Prevent Cyberbullying TELL—If you or someone you know gets a mean message through the computer or cell phone, you should tell your parents and another adult, like your teacher, right away If you know that someone else is getting mean messages, you should also tell an adult right away Kick them off your friends list Ignore the message Don’t respond Save the evidence 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 61

62 Culturally Responsive Best Practices Be aware of your student’s social context-reality Strength-based approach with students Reflect on how inclusive the curriculum is of students’ cultural and linguistic backgrounds Participate in training to further develop educator skills Hold high standards in academic achievement and behavior Consult with English Language Acquisition teacher on how to make curriculum accessible to English Language Learners Seek out consultation from cultural mediators/interpreters to improve cross-cultural effectiveness ( Adapted from Landsman and Lewis, 2006) E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 62 5/2/2015

63 Curriculums Addressing Cyberbullying Olweus Bullying Prevention Signs of Suicide (SOS) Second Step Stop/Walk/Talk (PBIS Bully prevention program) Commonsense.org Used in DPS to teach cybersafety Handouts available on Sharepoint Cyberbullying for Parents in English/Spanish Cyberbullying for Administrators E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 63 5/2/2015

64 Surveys Poster Family media agreements Tip sheets Videos Discussion guide Workshop script and slides Digital Life: Our Kids’ Connected Culture Gaming Internet Safety Privacy Cyberbullying Social Networking Online Worlds Managing Multitasking Respecting Creative Work High-Tech Cheating Instant/Text Messaging Sexting Cell phones Wikipedia Self-Expression and Identity Body Image Consumerism Media Violence Sex, Alcohol, & Smoking in Media Scary Movies Media for Babies and Toddlers Battling Stereotypes Program Materials 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 64

65 Best cyberbullying lessons from curriculum that easily integrate into regular curriculum Robust parent engagement resources for back to school night and more Used with permission from Brian Dino, DPS 2012 Elementary SchoolScreen Out the Mean Group Think Middle SchoolCrossing the LineBe Upstanding High SchoolTurn Down the Dial on Online Cruelty Taking Perspectives Cyberbullying Toolkit 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 65

66 Parent Media Education Program Comprehensive library of online resources available for FREE for schools to educate parents on how to guide their kids in becoming good digital citizens Materials in English and Spanish Surveys Parents Students Educators Communication templates Posters Letter from Principal Newsletter Article Parent education materials Tip sheets Videos Discussion guides Power Point slides and scripts Family Media Agreements 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 66

67 Next Steps Visit Check out the Cyberbullying Toolkit at Questions? Contact Brian Dino DPS website: search for “Dino”www.dpsk12.org 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 67

68 Directions to Access to the Olweus Bullying Prevention Materials: Go to DPS website, click on Staff Click on Teacher Portal on the left hand side. Log on Click on Schoolnet in the middle of the page, and log on again Hover over the Classrooms tab at the top of the page; then click on the Instructional Materials tab Under subject type in Bullying Prevention or Olweus; then click search. You will see three orange tabs in the middle of the page; the third says Curriculum. Click on this and it will take you to the Bullying Prevention Curriculum. Choose grade levels K-5 or 6-12 Under Year at a Glance, choose Class Meetings That Matter or CyberBullying for your grade level The classroom materials are listed under Instructional Unit and the additional resources, including the videos, are listed under Resources E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 68 5/2/2015

69 Olweus Cyberbullying Lessons Online and available to all DPS staff Cyber Bullying Session 5: What Do I Do if Someone Is Mean to Me Through Technology? story large-group discussion, a class game homework Includes posters and parent 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 69

70 Olweus Cyberbullying Lessons Grade 5 Cyber Bullying Session 1: What Is Bullying Cyber Bullying Session 2: What is Cyber Bullying Cyber Bullying Session 3: How Does Cyber Bullying Affect People? Cyber Bullying Session 4: How Do I Treat People Well When I Use Technology? Cyber Bullying Session 5: What Do I Do if Someone Is Mean to Me Through Technology? 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 70

71 Educa Radio Show Collaboration between MH&A and Multicultural Office Spanish Radio Show for Parents Hetty Pazos featured guest Cyberbullying: cyberbullying/ cyberbullying/ Other shows on ADHD, bullying, suicide risk and serving LGBTQ students E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 71 5/2/2015

72 Action Plan Based on what you have learned write down two things you would like to do in DPS next school year to address cyberbullying 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 72

73 Resources Olweus online on Teacher Portal Colorado Legacy Foundation Stop/Walk/Talk tion_ES.pdf One Colorado Commonsensemedia.org Colorado Safe School Resource Center 5/2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 73

74 E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 74 5/2/2015

75 Special Thanks for Sharing Information Common Sense Media, Brian Dino, DPS Colorado School Safety Resource Center Christine Harms /2/2015E Kelty, Mental Health and Assessment 75


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