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© 2011 > Text animation favorites > Screen transition effects > The facts behind “Death by PowerPoint” Or click the green arrow to.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2011 > Text animation favorites > Screen transition effects > The facts behind “Death by PowerPoint” Or click the green arrow to."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2011 > Text animation favorites > Screen transition effects > The facts behind “Death by PowerPoint” Or click the green arrow to advance. Home button returns you here. Animations and screen transitions should keep your audience turned on and tuned in. Home Next Steve Toms shares more than a decade of research Start the program clicking the screen icon below or by clicking on the Slide Show menu and either View Show or From Beginning.

2 © 2011 Wipe Fade Builds (often used together): Ascend Descend Emphasis (single point): Zoom Faded Zoom Focus (break continuity): Peek In Stretch Dissolve In Strips PowerPoint’s 52 animation effects Best for text animation Where to find PowerPoint 2003: Slide Show > Custom Animation > Add Effect box > Entrance > More Effects > PowerPoint 2007: Animations tab > Custom Animation > Add Effect box > Entrance > More Effects > Home Next Click the effect you wish to view or green arrow to step through each one These effects work best with images, shapes, and bordered text boxes

3 © 2011 Less is more, but presentation matters most Wipe: From left > fast (best for short phrases) Wipe From top > fast (best for quick builds) Wipe From top > medium (good for sharing examples after the animation) Wipe From bottom > medium (recommended as a reveal especially after a series of wipes from the top) Avoid wipes from right Less is more, but presentation matters most To repeat an animation: > Right mouse button > Previous > Left mouse button Wipe From top > medium (for a slower delivery) Click to display > Animation menu >

4 © 2011 Less is more, but presentation matters most Fade: All at once > fast Fade All at once > medium Fade by letter > very fast Fade By word > fast Fade By word > medium Less is more, but presentation matters most Less is more, but presentation matters most Less is more, but presentation matters most Less is more, but presentation matters most Animation menu >

5 © 2011 Less is more, but presentation matters most Ascend > fast (building bullet lists under a heading) Ascend > medium (Build curiosity; revealing answers) Descend > fast (Reveal/uncover from a heading or top of slide Descend > medium (Result of cause > effect) Ascend/Descend > medium (continuity between points or objects) Less is more, but presentation matters most Less is more, but presentation matters most Less is more, but presentation matters most When it comes to content: Less is more, but presentation matters most Animation menu >

6 © 2011 Less is more, but presentation matters most Zoom In Slightly > fast (quick reveal) Zoom Out Slight > fast (surprise reveal) Faded Zoom > fast (revealing point; avoid very fast or medium speeds) Peak In from Top > fast (a bit faster than Descend formula numerators Peek In from Bottom > fast (result of tabulation/equation; formula numerator) Less is more, but presentation matters most Less is more, but presentation matters most Animation menu >

7 © 2011 Less is more, but presentation matters most Stretch from Top > fast (use stretch left and right for text boxes and images) Stretch from Bottom > fast (summary/result) Dissolve In > fast (build curiosity; infer doubt; avoid overuse) Strips Right Down > medium (reveal; uncover; avoid all left text movement) Less is more, but presentation matters most Animation menu >

8 © 2011 Slide transitions are purposeful They show the audience where to find the first point on each slide When to switch attention between the slide and the presenter They can speed up or slow down the tempo of the presentation Click the green arrow to view Steve Toms’ favorite transitions

9 © 2011 Fades Strips Wipe Fade Push/Uncover Boxes Splits Wedge/Wheel Slow and medium speeds work best with transitions transitions PowerPoint offers 50+ screen transitions Best transitions to keep audiences focused: Where to find PowerPoint 2003: Slide Show > Screen Transitions > When you apply a transition, you see the effect on the current slide PowerPoint 2007: Animations tab > Pull down menu to view each effect Sample pull-down menu from PowerPoint 2007

10 © 2011 That was Fade through Black. Great way to start and end a presentation; use the slow speed. Slow Fades between slides tell audiences that you’re developing/continuing the topic by keeping the same images in place. Click the green arrow to view Strips. Transition menu >

11 © 2011 That was Strips Left Up. Notice how the audience’s eyes are drawn up to the upper left corner where they expect to find your first point. Use various directions to focus attention on any of the 4 corners of your slide; use the slow speed. Click the green arrow to view Wipes. Transition menu >

12 © 2011 That was Wipe Up. Wipes clean the screen so you can present a new topic or example. Slow and medium speeds work well (fast is a bit annoying). Direction should leave the audience looking at the spot where the next point will appear, or is already in place (such as this transition). Click the green arrow to view Push/Uncover. Transition menu >

13 © 2011 That was Uncover Left-Up. Like turning the page of a book or magazine; a great segue within/between topics. Push transitions are great when building a timeline, formula or series of related events. Push Left > future; Push Right > back in time. Click the green arrow to view Boxes. Transition menu >

14 © 2011 That was Box Out. Great for revealing examples; use the slow or medium speed. Box In tells the audience you are going deeper into a specific point. Click the green arrow to view Splits. Transition menu >

15 © 2011 That was Split Horizontal Out. As with Boxes, Splits reveal more about what you are discussing by either opening it to discovery (out), or covering what’s been discussed (in). Works with both horizontal or vertical. Click the green arrow to view Wedge. Transition menu >

16 © 2011 That was a Wedge. Great way to infer the passage of time, or build a sequence of logical points. Wheels accomplish the same thing; a Wheel Clockwise, 1 Spoke imitates a clock; 2-8 Spokes can get annoying. Click the green button for some closing thoughts. Transition menu >

17 © 2011 PowerPoint templates are not based on research In 2003, PowerPoint 3.0 introduced customizable templates for all types of contexts, including schools and clubs. Even today, template choices appear arranged by topics. A “Click here” easy-to-use program doesn’t mean easy-to-read. Too often, headlines are too big and in the wrong place. Too often, unanimated slides cause audiences read ahead and tune out. Too often, animation and transitions are more distracting than helpful. It’s simple: Too many are putting too much in all the wrong places; then boring us with how poorly they present it. Effective communication means learning how others take in and process information. PowerPoint is merely a tool; it does not know or follow the rules. Too often, it’s abused and misused.

18 © 2011 Animations and transitions are purposeful. They tell your audience where and when to find the points and images you display. Use animation to focus attention, one point at a time. Use bold and color to highlight important terms and images Use transitions to tell audiences what’s next… You’ll keep them turned on, and tuned in. Interested in a PowerPoint Master Class or have a question? Steve Toms. Home End


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