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Business Development and Carbon Capture: Future Technologies for Green Energy Christopher W. Jones Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemical.

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Presentation on theme: "Business Development and Carbon Capture: Future Technologies for Green Energy Christopher W. Jones Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemical."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Business Development and Carbon Capture: Future Technologies for Green Energy Christopher W. Jones Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Forum on Green Entrepreneurship Athens, Greece Tuesday, July 8, 2008

3 Motivation: Possibility that CO 2 emissions are impacting climate change motivates CO 2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS). Mann et al, Nature (1998) 392,

4 Motivation: Mann et al, Nature (1998) 392, Possibility that CO 2 emissions are impacting climate change motivates CO 2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS).

5 What is Carbon Capture and Sequestration? Combustion of fossil fuels produces CO 2, water and smaller amounts of pollutants (soot, SOx, NOx, etc.)

6 What is Carbon Capture and Sequestration? Combustion of fossil fuels produces CO 2, water and smaller amounts of pollutants (soot, SOx, NOx, etc.) Current technology “captures” trace pollutants.

7 What is Carbon Capture and Sequestration? Combustion of fossil fuels produces CO 2, water and smaller amounts of pollutants (soot, SOx, NOx, etc.) Current technology “captures” trace pollutants. Carbon capture is the trapping of the CO 2 produced – much larger volumes are involved.

8 What is Carbon Capture and Sequestration? Carbon sequestration is the storage of the captured CO 2 in a semi-permanent state.

9 What is Carbon Capture and Sequestration? Carbon sequestration is the storage of the captured CO 2 in a semi-permanent state.

10 Business Opportunities in CCS: Mature technology exists today that can allow CO 2 capture – “liquid amine absorption” – but it is expensive and inefficient.

11 Business Opportunities in CCS: Mature technology exists today that can allow CO 2 capture – “liquid amine absorption”– but it is expensive and inefficient. Implementation of standard technology with coal-fired power plants for CCS in the USA would lead to ~50-100% increase in the cost of electricity.

12 Business Opportunities in CCS: Mature technology exists today that can allow CO 2 capture – “liquid amine absorption”– but it is expensive and inefficient. Implementation of standard technology with coal-fired power plants for CCS in the USA would lead to ~50-100% increase in the cost of electricity. Most of the cost is associated with capture, not sequestration.

13 Business Opportunities in CCS: Mature technology exists today that can allow CO 2 capture – “liquid amine absorption” – but it is expensive and inefficient. Implementation of standard technology with coal-fired power plants for CCS in the USA would lead to ~50-100% increase in the cost of electricity. Most of the cost is associated with capture, not sequestration. Thus, new technology is needed that allows for more cost-effective CO 2 capture.

14 Georgia Tech CO 2 Capture Program: Vision: Develop paradigm-shifting technology that can drastically reduce the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas streams.

15 Georgia Tech CO 2 Capture Program: Vision: Develop paradigm-shifting technology that can drastically reduce the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas streams. Approach: Combine cutting-edge new CO 2 -adsorbing materials with new efficient processing approaches.

16 Georgia Tech CO 2 Capture Program: Vision: Develop paradigm-shifting technology that can drastically reduce the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas streams. Approach: Combine cutting-edge new CO 2 -adsorbing materials with new efficient processing approaches. Working with the US National Energy Technology Laboratory, we have developed a promising new material – a hyperbranched aminosilica material – that is: (i) low in cost (ii) easy to make (iii) has a very high CO 2 capacity.

17 Hyperbranched Aminosilica (HAS): Start with a common, low cost, environmentally benign material – silica.

18 Hyperbranched Aminosilica (HAS): Start with a common, low cost, environmentally benign material – silica. In one step, we synthesize a hyperbranched amine- containing polymer on the surface of the silica support. Amine sites are bases that effectively soak up the acidic CO 2 gas.

19 Hyperbranched Aminosilica (HAS): Start with a common, low cost, environmentally benign material – silica. In one step, we synthesize a hyperbranched amine- containing polymer on the surface of the silica support. Amine sites are bases that effectively soak up the acidic CO 2 gas. HAS adsorbent has a highly-branched structure, enhancing the amine accessibility, allowing for capture of large amounts of CO 2. HAS

20 Hyperbranched Aminosilica (HAS): Start with a common, low cost, environmentally benign material – silica. In one step, we synthesize a hyperbranched amine- containing polymer on the surface of the silica support. Amine sites are bases that effectively soak up the acidic CO 2 gas. HAS adsorbent has a highly-branched structure, enhancing the amine accessibility, allowing for capture of large amounts of CO 2. HAS CO 2

21 Hyperbranched Aminosilica (HAS): Start with a common, low cost, environmentally benign material – silica. In one step, we synthesize a hyperbranched amine- containing polymer on the surface of the silica support. Amine sites are bases that effectively soak up the acidic CO 2 gas. HAS adsorbent has a highly-branched structure, enhancing the amine accessibility, allowing for capture of large amounts of CO 2. HAS CO 2 HAS is low cost, easy to make, and has a high CO 2 capacity. C. W. Jones et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 2902.

22 Exhaust from combustion. Key: HAS adsorbant Non-CO 2 flue gas CO 2 Schematic of a CO 2 Capture Process

23 75˚C Schematic of a CO 2 Capture Process Exhaust from combustion. Key: HAS adsorbant Non-CO 2 flue gas CO 2

24 Exhaust with 90% CO 2 removed Schematic of a CO 2 Capture Process 75˚C Exhaust from combustion. Key: HAS adsorbant Non-CO 2 flue gas CO 2

25 Schematic of a CO 2 Capture Process Exhaust with 90% CO 2 removed 75˚C Exhaust from combustion. Key: HAS adsorbant Non-CO 2 flue gas CO 2

26 Schematic of a CO 2 Capture Process 125˚C Exhaust with 90% CO 2 removed 75˚C Exhaust from combustion. Key: HAS adsorbant Non-CO 2 flue gas CO 2

27 125˚C CO 2 for sequestration or conversion Schematic of a CO 2 Capture Process Exhaust with 90% CO 2 removed 75˚C Exhaust from combustion. Key: HAS adsorbant Non-CO 2 flue gas CO 2

28 Business Opportunities in CCS: Sequestration vs. Utilization -- very few large scale utilization strategies 1) Enhanced Oil Recovery – EOR: -- use pressurized CO 2 to allow secondary recovery of hard to access crude oil -- some CO 2 remains underground

29 Business Opportunities in CCS: Sequestration vs. Utilization 2) Algae-based Biofuels: -- algae use CO 2 as a nutrient via photosynthesis -- algae are being engineered to produce hydrocarbons suitable for Diesel fuel use as well as ethanol. Photo from Popular Mechanics: science/earth/ html

30 Conclusions: There are numerous business opportunities in both CO 2 capture and sequestration/utilization. New GT hyperbranched aminosilica sorbent has: 1.Very high capacity 2.Multi-cycle stability 3.Simple, low cost, scalable design promising for commercial application. Current work seeks to develop a new process for implementation of HAS materials in post-combustion CO 2 capture in collaboration with our research partners: US Department of Energy - National Energy Technology Laboratory

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32 Adsorption Results: 75 ºC adsorption, 130 ºC desorption. Multi-cycle stability.


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