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Head Start and Homelessness James A. Scott, Jr., Ph.D. Director Head Start State Collaboration Office Ohio Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "Head Start and Homelessness James A. Scott, Jr., Ph.D. Director Head Start State Collaboration Office Ohio Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Head Start and Homelessness James A. Scott, Jr., Ph.D. Director Head Start State Collaboration Office Ohio Department of Education

2 Head Start in Ohio 66 Head Start grantees and delegate agencies 36,854 children in Head Start and Early Head Start 5 th largest Head Start enrollment in the country

3 Head Start in Ohio Federal funding for Ohio: over $248 million Migrant/Seasonal Head Start provided to over 900 children Fall 2009: Expecting an expansion of more children in Head Start and Early Head Start

4 Poverty in Ohio Three of the top 10 poorest cities are in Ohio -#2 Cleveland (30.5%) -#7 Cincinnati (25.1%) -#8 Toledo (24.7%) Poverty rate for Ohio’s children under 18 increased from 19.1% in 2007 to 21% in 2008 (530,000 to 575,000) (COHHIO,2009)

5 Homelessness in Ohio On any one night in ,463 Ohioans were homeless Homeless families generally: -have lower incomes -are younger -more likely to include a pregnant adult and less likely to have a housing subsidy than their non- homeless, low-income counterparts (COHHIO, 2009)

6 Impact of Homelessness on Children and Families school year: 794,617 homeless children and youth enrolled in public schools State of the economy and the mortgage and foreclosure crisis have increased the number of homeless families Two trends: shortage of affordable housing and an increase in severe poverty (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

7 Impact of Homelessness on Children and Families Impacts a child’s health and well-being Related to increased rates of hunger; inability to focus and concentrate; increased absences; chronic illnesses All of these health risks increase the chances that a homeless child will fall behind in school. (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

8 The McKinney-Vento Act Defines homeless children and youth as “Individuals who lack a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence” Ensures that children and youth receive the support they need to enroll, attend and succeed in school (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

9 The McKinney-Vento Act State Education Agency required to establish an Office of State Coordinator for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth Every Local Education Agency (LEA) is required to: -designate a Liaison for students in homeless situations -ensure that school personnel identify homeless children and youth -conduct additional identification through coordination with other entities and agencies (Duffield, Heybach&Julianelle, 2009)

10 Homelessness and Young Children National survey: over 40% of children living in shelters are under the age of five Head Start children experiencing homelessness have greater developmental delays and exhibit a higher frequency of socio-emotional problems in comparison to non-homeless children served by Head Start. (Burt, Aron & Douglas, 1999)

11 Head Start and Homeless Children Definition of homelessness in the Head Start Act is the same as in the McKinney-Vento Act Homeless children are categorically eligible for Head Start. The Head Start Act requires the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to issue regulations for serving homeless children. ( Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

12 Head Start and Homeless Children In 2008, Ohio Head Start programs served 650 homeless children in 540 homeless families. In 2008, 335 homeless families in Ohio acquired housing. Head Start State Collaboration Directors must develop a strategic plan that will enhance collaboration and coordination with and services for homeless children. (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

13 Head Start and Homeless Children Head Start agencies must coordinate and collaborate with programs under Subtitle VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Head Start programs must establish channels of communication between Head Start staff and McKinney-Vento liaisons to facilitate coordination of programs. (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

14 Head Start and Homeless Children Head Start programs must develop and implement a family outreach and support program in coordination with outreach efforts under the McKinney-Vento Act. Early Head Start programs must coordinate services with programs in the community for homeless infants and toddlers. (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

15 Access to Early Childhood Education for Homeless Children Public School Preschool Head Start and Early Head Start IDEA Part C (Duffield, Heybach & Julianelle, 2009)

16 References Burt, Aron & Douglas. (1999). Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve: Summary Report – Findings of the national Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients. Washington, D.C.: The Urban Institute. Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio. (2009). October Monthly Newsletter.

17 References Duffield, B., Heybach, L., & Julianelle, P. (2009). Educating children without housing: A primer on legal requirements and implementation strategies for educators, advocates and policymakers (3 rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association, Commission on Homelessness and Poverty.


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