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1 Homeless Students & Title I May 2011. 2 Homeless Students & Title I May 2011 Welcome & Introductions Agenda –Do we have homeless students in Massachusetts?

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Presentation on theme: "1 Homeless Students & Title I May 2011. 2 Homeless Students & Title I May 2011 Welcome & Introductions Agenda –Do we have homeless students in Massachusetts?"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Homeless Students & Title I May 2011

2 2 Homeless Students & Title I May 2011 Welcome & Introductions Agenda –Do we have homeless students in Massachusetts? –So who is homeless? –The impact of homelessness on learning –McKinney-Vento & Title 1 –Questions

3 3 In Massachusetts … … in 2009/10 schools identified over 13,000 children and youth who went to school homeless... … many homeless students are never identified – the total is estimated as high as 50,000. ESE Annual Homeless Education Data Collection MA Youth Risk Behavior Survey 2005, 07, 09

4 4 So Who is Homeless? According to McKinney-Vento: anyone who lacks fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence is homeless. This includes students who are Living in shelters, Living in campgrounds, parks, cars, public buildings, Doubled up with friends or relatives, Abandoned in a hospital Unaccompanied youth, or Awaiting Foster care. ESE Advisory : Definitions

5 5 The Data Primary nighttime residence # of homeless students in districts with no grant # of homeless students in districts with a grant Total Shelters8272,4043,231 Doubled-up1,1504,3905,540 Unaccompanied Youth Unsheltered Hotels/Motels Awaiting Foster Care 6801,3842,064 Total3,5019,58913,090

6 6 Impact of Homelessness on Learning Homelessness impacts learning in a multitude of ways. In search of shelter, and eventually housing, families and unaccompanied youth are frequently on the move and living day to day. This precarious existence can be a source of trauma for children, youth, and parents that affects the ability to focus in class, to feel safe in the classroom, and to come to school prepared for the day.

7 7 Impact of Homelessness on Learning Going to school homeless can result in Many school transfers, Significant educational gaps, Frequent absences and tardy arrivals, Lack of supplies and space to do homework and projects, Poor medical, dental and mental health care, Distractions and an inability to attend to lessons, and Hoarding.

8 8 Educational Rights of Homeless Children and Youth School selection, the right to remain in the last school attended or enroll locally Transportation back to the last school attended Immediate enrollment with or without records Right to dispute the school’s enrollment decisions Equal access to attend and participate in all school courses, activities, and events Free lunch (and breakfast if served) And the opportunity to succeed

9 9 McKinney-Vento & Title I State Homeless Student Count 13,864 (or 1.7% of 806,856) 6,106 No Title 1 Services 7,758 Received Title I services 56% of Homeless Students receive Title I services 29% of all MA students receive Title I services

10 10 McKinney-Vento & Title I Homeless children and youth are automatically eligible for Title I services Even if they do not attend a Title I school or meet the academic standards required of other children for eligibility

11 11 McKinney-Vento & Title I Title I Set-Aside Districts are mandated to assess the needs of homeless children and reserve the Title I funds necessary to meet those needs including: Providing comparable services to a homeless student who does not attend a Title I school; and Providing services that are not ordinarily provided to other Title I students and that are not available from other sources.

12 12 McKinney-Vento & Title I The Homeless Liaison and Title I Director must do an assessment of the unique needs of the district’s homeless students. Such as: Before-/after-school, summer programs, School uniforms, school supplies, other basic needs, Physical and mental health needs, Teachers, aides, and tutors, and Parent program outreach to homeless families.

13 13 McKinney-Vento & Title I Calculating The Homeless Student Set Aside/Reservation Use the cost of services needed by homeless students Use the homeless student count x the Title I per-pupil expenditure Use an amount greater than or equal to your McKinney- Vento sub-grant Use a percent of total Title I funds based on the district’s poverty level.

14 14 McKinney-Vento & Title I Summary A plan to address the needs of homeless students and the set-aside necessary to meet those needs must be included in the Title I application, even if the district does not currently have any homeless students.

15 15 Office for the Education of Homeless Children & Youth Peter D. Cirioni, State Coordinator Sarah Slautterback, Specialist


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