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Sentence Structure Objective: Vary sentence types and beginnings to create rhythm and to direct the reader’s attention.

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Presentation on theme: "Sentence Structure Objective: Vary sentence types and beginnings to create rhythm and to direct the reader’s attention."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sentence Structure Objective: Vary sentence types and beginnings to create rhythm and to direct the reader’s attention.

2 Example: This sentence has five words. This is five words too. Five word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes when I am certain the reader is rested I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the symbols, and sounds that say listen to this, it is important. (Gary Provost, Make Your Words Work).

3 Sentence Structure Video http//: Take notes on simple, compound and complex sentences.

4 Clauses A clause contains a subject and a predicate There are two types of clauses: Independent- contains one thought that makes sense on it’s own Dependent- expresses one thought, but needs to combine with an independent clause to make sense. SIMPLE SENTENCE = 1 independent clause COMPOUND SENTENCE = 1 independent clause, + coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so) + 1 independent clause COMPLEX = 1 independent clause + 1 dependent clause (Dependent clause contains a subordinating conjunction (as, if, while, although, etc.) COMPOUND-COMPLEX= Dependent clause, + independent clause + coordinating conjunction + independent clause PRACTICE IDENTIFYING SENTENCE TYPES: 48.html

5 Varying Sentence Starts Most common sentence pattern: Subject Verb “The White House is a mansion. It is one of the largest houses in the US. The “square footage of the building is 55,000 square feet and the amount of land is 18 acres.” (White House) That is huge! The White House obviously took a very long time to make. The person that designed this terrific building was the Irish-American architect, James Hoban.” James should get a whole lot more recognition than what he is given. People need to respect that he built, which is arguably the most significant building of all time. He not only designed a building, but a fortress. The White House is the safe and proper place for our president to reside in. The president should feel not only safety in this house but comfort.”

6 Varying Sentence Starts Most common sentence pattern: Subject Verb “The White House is a mansion. It is one of the largest houses in the US. The “square footage of the building is 55,000 square feet and the amount of land is 18 acres.” (White House) That is huge! The White House obviously took a very long time to make. The person that designed this terrific building was the Irish-American architect, James Hoban.” James should get a whole lot more recognition than what he is given. People need to respect that he built, which is arguably the most significant building of all time. He not only designed a building, but a fortress. The White House is the safe and proper place for our president to reside in. The president should feel not only safety in this house but comfort.”

7 Options for starting a sentence -Begin with a prepositional phrase: - Across the lake, the party was just starting. -Begin with a participle phrase (ing or ed words): -Hoping for the bell to ring, the student glanced at the clock -Begin with a dependent clause: -Although I prefer dogs, I finally see that cats are not pure evil. -Begin with an infinitive phrase; -To catch a criminal, you have to think like one. -Use an appositive phrase. -Christmas break, a much needed two week vacation, is just around the corner.

8 Most Common Prepositions aboard about above across after against along amid among anti around as at before behind below beneath beside besides between Beyond "English Prepositions LIst." English Club. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Dec over past per plus regarding round save since than through to toward towards under underneath unlike until up upon versus via with within without but by concerning considering despite down during except excepting excluding following for from in inside into like minus near of off on onto opposite outside


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