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1. Teacher Performance Standard 4 2 Level III Level III is the expected level of performance. The teacher consistently challenges and supports each student’s.

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Presentation on theme: "1. Teacher Performance Standard 4 2 Level III Level III is the expected level of performance. The teacher consistently challenges and supports each student’s."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Teacher Performance Standard 4 2 Level III Level III is the expected level of performance. The teacher consistently challenges and supports each student’s learning by providing appropriate content and developing skills which address individual learning differences.

3 3 1. Think about everything you know about the topic. 2.Write for 1 minute. 3.Pass to the right. 4.Read what the new page says. 5.Put a check on one idea you think is important. 6.Add a term to the list. 7.Repeat. 8.At your table, discuss the 3 top ideas. Differentiated Instruction

4 4 1. Opening: 1. Activate Prior Knowledge 2. Set learning targets 2. Work Session: 1. Vocabulary: Define differentiation. What is it? What is it not? 2. Identify differentiated instruction in lessons 3. Determine role of assessment with DI 4. Define DI at the school level 3. Closing: 1. Summarize 2. Set goals for sharing common understanding Handout: Agenda

5 Targets I can define Differentiated Instruction using language from GaDOE Teacher Performance Standards. I can identify classroom practices that differentiate instruction for learning. I can develop a plan for sharing a common understanding of DI at my school. (Set a personal learning goal. What do you hope to take away from the session?) 5

6 The Culture of a Differentiated Classroom Differentiation is a teacher’s response to learners’ needs Learning/Interest Centers, RAFTS, Graphic Organizers, Scaffolded Reading, Intelligence Preferences, Tiered Assignments, Learning Contracts, Menus, Tic-Tac-Toe, Complex Instruction, Independent Projects, Expression Options, Small-Group Instruction. Using Instructional Strategies Such AsTeachers can differentiate through Content Process Product Learning Environment According to students’ Interest Readiness Learning Modality Adapted from Carol Tomlinson,

7 What Is DI? What Is It Not? 7 DefinitionCharacteristics Examples Non-examples Differentiated Instruction

8 GaDOE Resources Provide a Framework for Common Understanding 8

9 TASK: Work with a partner. Define Differentiated Instruction on Frayer: 1.Read the Quick Guide (Characteristics, Examples) 2.Read the Fact Sheet (Characteristics, Examples) 3.Read the Infographic (Non-examples) 4.Read pp. 5-7 Course Participant’s Guide (Examples) 5.Come to consensus on a definition 6.Include characteristics 7.Write at least 3 examples of DI – include an example from your content/grade 8.Write at least 3 non-examples of DI TKES Support

10 DI and Related Teacher Performance Standards 10

11 Accommodations: 11 A change in instruction or setting that enables students to demonstrate their abilities in the classroom or an assessment/test setting. Accommodations are designed to provide equity, not advantage, for students with disabilities. When used appropriately, they reduce or even eliminate the effects of a student’s disability but do not reduce or lower the standards or expectations for content. Modifications: Refers to alterations in curriculum that change, lower, or reduce learning expectations and outcome. The use of modifications exposes the student to the entire curriculum, but only partial mastery is expected. Modifications: DI and Special Education

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13 TASK: Identify DI Teacher Planning & Practices Responsive Teaching 1.Discuss the video clips. 2.Identify characteristics and examples of differentiated instruction in both elementary & high. Support your thinking. 3.What questions might an evaluator ask the teacher(s)?

14 AssessmentAssessment Use with DI is Formative Traditional Classroom Differentiated Classroom 14 Assessment is most common at the end of learning to see “who got it” Assessment is ongoing and diagnostic to understand how to make instruction more responsive to learner need

15 Exit slips * Admit slips * TOTD 15 Examples Elementary: https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teacher- assessment-strategy https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teacher- assessment-strategy MS/HS: https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/student- daily-assessment https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/student- daily-assessment Ticket in the Door or My Favorite No: https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/class-warm- up-routine https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/class-warm- up-routine

16 Responsive Teaching 16 With thoughtful use of assessment data, the teacher can modify content, process, or product. Content: what students learn and the materials or mechanisms through which that is accomplished. Process: activities/work designed to ensure students use key skills to make sense out of essential ideas. Products: vehicles through which students demonstrate and extend what they have learned.

17 Examples of Differentiated Instruction: Tomlinson Figure 1.2Tomlinson Figure An elementary teacher uses digital video images of geological phenomena to support understanding of students who have no experience with the phenomena and who need to develop academic vocabulary related to the phenomena. A biology teacher uses athletic teams, families, and rock bands to illustrate the concept of symbiosis. During a poetry unit, a teacher finds more students are engaged when she discusses the creative aspects of poems and how the poems connect to students' lives (practical aspects) along with analytical aspects. Based on pre-assessment information, a primary teacher begins a unit on telling time by having some students work with telling time by the hour and half hour, some by telling time to five- minute intervals, and some by telling time to the minute. Students look for examples of symmetry in objects they use at home or in hobbies and create an exhibit of their objects with an explanation of how they use the objects and why the objects represent symmetry. Primary students must learn how Earth's rotation and revolution create day and night and season. To begin the unit, the teacher illustrates the concept of rotation by having students stand and rotate, find and explain objects that rotate, sing about rotation, and draw something that rotates. A middle school teacher provides all students with models of effective student products from prior years to help them analyze what quality work looks like. Although all of the examples demonstrate proficiency with KUDs, students who are more advanced with the content examine models at a higher degree of sophistication. High school students studying Robert Frost's "Road Not Taken" use the life of a famous person or well-known character from movies or literature to demonstrate parallels between the events in the poem and in the life of the person they chose. Elementary students use meteorological data to make a forecast for the week ahead in their town. All students must predict the weather and explain their prediction. They may write and illustrate the forecast for the local paper, present the forecast for TV, or create a weather map that depicts their forecast.

18 The bottom line “Good lessons start with a clear, curriculum- based objective and assessment, followed by multiple cycles of instruction, guided practice, checks for understanding (the soul of a good lesson), and ongoing adjustments to instruction.” Mike Schmoker

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20 Differentiated Instruction Defined 20 Examples Non-Examples

21 Understanding Evaluation of Std. 4 Observations: When Will DI be Evaluated? How Are Student Perception Data Used? 21

22 How Can We Support Teachers? 22 First Steps for Differentiating at the High School Level (Kristina Doubet, ASCD) cond Helping Primary Students Become Responsible, Self- reliant Learners (Monica Harrold, ASCD) ementary Teaching Channel: https://www.teachingchannel.org/https://www.teachingchannel.org/ Coastal Plains RESA TKES Support:

23 Where Am I Going? Where Am I Now? How Can I Close the Gap? I can define Differentiated Instruction using language from GaDOE Teacher Performance Standards. I can identify classroom practices that differentiate instruction for learning. I can develop a plan for sharing a common understanding of DI at my school. I met/did not meet my personal learning target. To follow up, I need to Handout: Agenda

24 Summarize at Your Table Revisit your circle map and Frayer Model. Cross out any misconceptions. 2. What big ideas do you want teachers at your school to know? 3. Write a step you will take to strengthen your current practice or a current practice at your school. 4. Set a date/time to work on Goal 3 of the Agenda: Develop a plan for sharing a common understanding at your school. 5. Revisit your personal learning goal. Was it met?

25 Resources at

26 Research Base 26 Tomlinson and Moon, Assessment and Student Success in a Differentiated Classroom, ASCD, Tomlinson, The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of all Learners, ASCD, GaDOE, Quick Guide Standard 4 GaDOE, Fact Sheet Standard 4 GaDOE, Differentiated Instruction: A Teacher’s and School Leader’s Guide for Improvement (Participant’s Guide)


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