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PewInternet.org Networked Learners Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project 8.22.12 – Learning 2.0

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Presentation on theme: "PewInternet.org Networked Learners Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project 8.22.12 – Learning 2.0"— Presentation transcript:

1 PewInternet.org Networked Learners Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project – Learning

2 4 questions for educators to ponder in the age of networked individuals 1.What is the future of knowledge? - Created? Disseminated? 2.What is the future of learning spaces? - Physical presence? Collaboration? Alliances? Ownership? 3.What is the future of reference expertise -Literacies? Search? 4.What is the future of community anchor institutions like schools? - Knowledge economy/ecology?

3 Digital Revolution 1 Internet (82%) and Broadband at home (66%) 71% 66%

4 Broadband at home – 66%

5 Networked creators among internet users 69% are social networking site users 59% share photos and videos 37% contribute rankings and ratings 33% create content tags 30% share personal creations 26% post comments on sites and blogs 15% have personal website 15% are content remixers 16% use Twitter 14% are bloggers … of smartphone owners, 18% share their locations; 74% get location info and do location sharing

6 56% of adults own laptops – up from 30% in % of adults own MP3 players – up from 11% in % of adults own DVRs – up from 3% in % of adults own game consoles 19% of adults own e-book readers - Kindle 19% of adults own tablet computer - iPad

7 Consequences for learning ecosystem Volume Velocity Vibrance Valence / Relevance

8 140% increase words consumed since 1980 Info consumption up from 7.4 hours a day in 1960 to 11.8 hours in 2008 Reading volume has grown 3X since ,500 words per day and 34 gigabytes

9 Broadband facilitates networked information Links and multimedia Self-paced learning Analytics Pervasive media

10 Big challenge for schools Atoms bits Knowledge rendering is disrupted

11 Mobile phones – 89% of adults Total U.S. population: million 2011

12 Mobile is the Needle: 89% of US Adults Have a Cell Phone Teen data July 2011 Adult data Feb 2012 % in each age group who have a cell phone

13 Changes in smartphone ownership

14 Smartphones – 46%

15 Apps – 50% of adults

16 Teens: Texting takes off and talking slips

17 Mobile connectivity alters learning venues and expectations New access points to knowledge (AAA) Real-time sharing, just- in-time searching Augmented reality Pervasive, perpetual awareness of social networks Attention zones morph

18 Big challenge for educators People come to us We go to people The school as place becomes the school as placeless resource

19 Digital Revolution 3 Social networking – 52% of all adults % of internet users

20 Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, October 20-November 28, 2010 Social Networking survey.

21 Social media aids peer-to- peer learning by doing Elevates DIY learning in soc.nets Increases the role of social networks in learning Facilitates rise of amateur experts Changes character of soc.nets

22 Big challenge for educators Expertise and influence emerges in networks and algorithms Share the stage with amateur experts

23 Information is Woven Into Our Lives Mobile is the needle, Social Networks are the thread Social Networks… Surround us with information through our many connections Bring us information from multiple, varied sources Provide instant feedback, meaning and context Allow us to shape and create information ourselves and amplify others’ messages Mobile… Moves information with us Makes information accessible ANYTIME and ANYWHERE Puts information at our fingertips Magnifies the demand for timely information Makes information location- sensitive

24 Social networks and social media become more important in people’s learning strategies Consequences for learning ecosystem

25 What does this mean? 1) Social networks are more influential and are differently segmented and layered Sentries

26 What does this mean? Evaluators 1) Social networks are more influential and are differently segmented and layered

27 What does this mean? Audience = New media are the new neighborhood 1) Social networks are more influential and are differently segmented and layered

28 New kinds of learners emerge More self-directed Better arrayed to capture new info More reliant on feedback and response More inclined to collaboration More oriented towards being nodes of production

29 Back to those 4 questions: How eductors can be even more valuable the world of networked individuals

30 1) What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is objective and certain Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is subjective and provisional

31 1) What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Learners receive knowledge Old: Learning as transaction Learners create knowledge

32 1) What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is organized in stable, hierarchical structures that can be treated independently of one another Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is organized “ecologically”- disciplines are integrative and interactive

33 1) What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process We learn best passively, by listening and watching Old: Learning as transaction We learn best actively doing and managing our own learning

34 1) What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Our “intelligence” is based on our individual abilities Old: Learning as transaction Our “intelligence” is based on our learning communities

35 2) What is the future of learning spaces? Attuned to networked individuals/learners More self directed, less top-down Better arrayed to capture new information inputs More reliant on feedback and response More inclined to collaboration More open to cross discipline insights and creating their own “tagged” taxonomies More oriented towards people being their own individual nodes of production

36 3) What is the future of reference expertise? “Embedded educators” in learning communities Teacher as scout for relevant material Reviewer and synthesizer Organizer and taxonomy creator “On call” for just-in-time information Organizational “steward” of bonding capital Organizational “steward” of bridging capital (especially to outside experts) Good source: David Schumaker at

37 3) What is the future of reference expertise? “Knowledge concierge/valet” in learning communities Teacher as modeler of social media creation Teacher as fact checker, transparency assessor, relevance arbiter Teacher as aggregator and curator – follow Jeff Jarvis rule: “Do what you do best, and link to the rest” Teacher as “node” in networks attuned to perpetual learning Good source: Bill Densmore at

38 4) What is the future of community anchor institutions? ALA Confronting the Future Strategic Visions for the 21 st Century Public Library ublications/policybriefs/confronting_the_f utu.pdf

39 A short list of critical uncertainties Security of the internet Future of intellectual property Tolerance of ed systems (and accrediting authorities) for blended practices: online/offline, home/school, proficiency standards for individuals/cohorts The importance of new literacies and strategies for addressing divides

40 Your map is wrong

41 Thank you!


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