Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Carol City Middle School Superintendent’s Urban Principal Initiative 2007-2008 Addressing Multiple Intelligence to Increase Student Achievement Team Members.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Carol City Middle School Superintendent’s Urban Principal Initiative 2007-2008 Addressing Multiple Intelligence to Increase Student Achievement Team Members."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carol City Middle School Superintendent’s Urban Principal Initiative Addressing Multiple Intelligence to Increase Student Achievement Team Members Mr. Nelson Izquierdo, Jr., Principal Mrs. Tricia M. Fernandez, Assistant Principal Mrs. Mesha Campbell-McLemore, Teacher Leader

2 Abstract A pretest measuring higher cognitive thinking skills was administered to two groups of eighth grade students. One group was instructed in small groups of five or less while the other group was instructed in the traditional, large group setting. The students in the small group were classified by their preferred intelligence style using a Multiple Intelligence (MI) Inventory Test. The students who received instruction based on their preferred learning style performed better on the post-test. A pretest measuring higher cognitive thinking skills was administered to two groups of eighth grade students. One group was instructed in small groups of five or less while the other group was instructed in the traditional, large group setting. The students in the small group were classified by their preferred intelligence style using a Multiple Intelligence (MI) Inventory Test. The students who received instruction based on their preferred learning style performed better on the post-test.

3 Introduction By identifying students and placing them in one of eight different multiple intelligence groups, Ms. Gainor, a Social Studies teacher was able to effectively instruct her students using higher levels of cognitive skills as defined by Blooms’ Taxonomy. By identifying students and placing them in one of eight different multiple intelligence groups, Ms. Gainor, a Social Studies teacher was able to effectively instruct her students using higher levels of cognitive skills as defined by Blooms’ Taxonomy. Teaching to achieve high levels of cognitive functioning is difficult and often counterproductive if students are not receptive to the presentation of the lesson, and the cognitive level of the assignment (Armstrong 2000). Given the traditional lecture, textbook, review and examination sequence, students often miss the mark and function nominally just to satisfy the minimum allowable standard for passing. Lacking in motivation, skills, and determination, many traditional or regular middle school students are ‘just getting by’ while at times pretending to master the content. Many times these students are comfortable settling for mediocrity. Teaching to achieve high levels of cognitive functioning is difficult and often counterproductive if students are not receptive to the presentation of the lesson, and the cognitive level of the assignment (Armstrong 2000). Given the traditional lecture, textbook, review and examination sequence, students often miss the mark and function nominally just to satisfy the minimum allowable standard for passing. Lacking in motivation, skills, and determination, many traditional or regular middle school students are ‘just getting by’ while at times pretending to master the content. Many times these students are comfortable settling for mediocrity.

4 Background/Context Built in 1959, Carol City Middle School is located near the Miami-Dade- Broward County line in a culturally diverse, urban community in Miami Gardens that is comprised primarily of low and middle income families. Built in 1959, Carol City Middle School is located near the Miami-Dade- Broward County line in a culturally diverse, urban community in Miami Gardens that is comprised primarily of low and middle income families. Carol City Middle School is located on fourteen acres at 3737 N.W. 188th Street, Miami Gardens, FL. The school has undergone facility renovations during the last seven years. Carol City Middle School is located on fourteen acres at 3737 N.W. 188th Street, Miami Gardens, FL. The school has undergone facility renovations during the last seven years. Carol City Middle School has an enrollment of approximately 945 students. There are currently 772 students on free lunch, and 95 students on reduced lunch. Carol City Middle School has an enrollment of approximately 945 students. There are currently 772 students on free lunch, and 95 students on reduced lunch.

5 Data Collection FCAT Currently, this is what the 6 th Grade Data Reveals in Reading

6 Data Collection FCAT Currently, this is what the 6 th Grade Data Reveals in Mathematics

7 Data Collection FCAT Currently, this is what the 7 th Grade Data Reveals in Reading

8 Data Collection FCAT Currently, this is what the 7 th Grade Data Reveals in Mathematics

9 Data Collection FCAT Currently, this is what the 8 th Grade Data Reveals in Reading

10 Data Collection FCAT Currently, this is what the 8 th Grade Data Reveals in Mathematics

11 Ethnic Composition of Identified Subgroups Carol City Middle School’s population reflects the ethnic composition of the community: Carol City Middle School’s population reflects the ethnic composition of the community: - 83% African American, - 15 % Hispanic - less than 1% White (non-Hispanic). Carol City Middle School services: Carol City Middle School services: - 16 Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students Students with Disabilities (SWD) students in the Gifted Program.

12 Unique Challenges Carol City Middle School has identified several issues concerning challenges in student achievement. Students’ scores on the 2007 FCAT indicate a need to modify instructional methods to raise the level of achievement and reduce the number of students at the lowest performance levels. Carol City Middle School has identified several issues concerning challenges in student achievement. Students’ scores on the 2007 FCAT indicate a need to modify instructional methods to raise the level of achievement and reduce the number of students at the lowest performance levels.

13 Leadership Team The Carol City Middle School Leadership Team is comprised of the Principal, Mr. Nelson Izquierdo, Jr., Assistant Principal of Curriculum, Mrs. Tricia M. Fernandez, Assistant Principal of Facilities and Operations, Dr. Peter Jenkins, Mr. William Wesley Administrative Assistant, and Ms. Hattie Ashley, Testing Chairperson. The Carol City Middle School Leadership Team is comprised of the Principal, Mr. Nelson Izquierdo, Jr., Assistant Principal of Curriculum, Mrs. Tricia M. Fernandez, Assistant Principal of Facilities and Operations, Dr. Peter Jenkins, Mr. William Wesley Administrative Assistant, and Ms. Hattie Ashley, Testing Chairperson. Carol City Middle School employs: Carol City Middle School employs: - 93 full-time staff members - 57 instructional personnel - 13 teachers hold a Masters Degree - 13 teachers hold a Masters Degree - 2 teachers hold a specialist/doctorate degree - 2 teachers hold a specialist/doctorate degree - 1 administrator holds a doctorate degree - 1 administrator holds a doctorate degree - 1 National Board Certified Teacher - 1 National Board Certified Teacher - 1 paraprofessional - 4 full-time security guards - 1 part-time security guard - 1 Community Involvement Specialist

14 Demographics of Faculty and Staff The demographic breakdown of our faculty is as follows: - 15 males - 42 females - 28% of the staff is White - 61% of the staff is African American - 7% of the staff is Hispanic - 4% of the staff is Multi-Ethnic.

15 Research Question How will teaching to eighth grade students identified multiple intelligence (MI) strengths increase their achievement in Social Studies? How will teaching to eighth grade students identified multiple intelligence (MI) strengths increase their achievement in Social Studies?

16 Participant Information Two Social Studies classes were identified to participate in the Action Research study. Two Social Studies classes were identified to participate in the Action Research study. Period 4 Period 6 Number of Students 2521 Number of Girls 1110 Number of Boys 1411 Ethnicity 2 Hispanic 23 African- American 5 Hispanic 16 African American

17 Multiple Intelligence Styles

18 Literature Review Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory helps teachers differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all students. Teachers need to remember to encompass all intelligences when presenting lessons. Teachers need to address a balance of intelligences to help students who are at-risk of not retaining information. In fact, MI is beneficial to learning disabled students because it emphasizes their strengths (Pokey, 2003). Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory helps teachers differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all students. Teachers need to remember to encompass all intelligences when presenting lessons. Teachers need to address a balance of intelligences to help students who are at-risk of not retaining information. In fact, MI is beneficial to learning disabled students because it emphasizes their strengths (Pokey, 2003).

19 Literature Review Continued By addressing MI, teachers are developing positive relationships between students of all levels of ability. Teachers can also expect to see an increase in student performance and engagement. Teachers using such an approach are supporting individual student interests and preferences, which helps students become more motivated and engaged in the learning process (Costa, 2000). By addressing MI, teachers are developing positive relationships between students of all levels of ability. Teachers can also expect to see an increase in student performance and engagement. Teachers using such an approach are supporting individual student interests and preferences, which helps students become more motivated and engaged in the learning process (Costa, 2000).

20 Literature Review Continued Not all students learn or understand material the same way. The teacher is the expert in the material being presented and the students choose which way they would like to show mastery. The purpose of learning is to provide options and let students show their creativity using their intelligence strength (Diaz Lefebvre, 2004). Not all students learn or understand material the same way. The teacher is the expert in the material being presented and the students choose which way they would like to show mastery. The purpose of learning is to provide options and let students show their creativity using their intelligence strength (Diaz Lefebvre, 2004). “It’s not how smart you are but how you are smart.” (Diaz Lefebvre, 2004). “It’s not how smart you are but how you are smart.” (Diaz Lefebvre, 2004).

21 Intervention The students were given a MI Inventory test at the beginning of the school year. The purpose of this test was to determine each students MI profile and group them accordingly. A pretest was given in October and a post test was given in April to see if addressing MI learning preferences increased student achievement. The students were given a MI Inventory test at the beginning of the school year. The purpose of this test was to determine each students MI profile and group them accordingly. A pretest was given in October and a post test was given in April to see if addressing MI learning preferences increased student achievement. The students were also required to complete journal reflections about their experience working in the eight MI groups. Aside from the researchers, Ms. Gainor, the eighth grade Social Studies teacher was involved in this process. The students were also required to complete journal reflections about their experience working in the eight MI groups. Aside from the researchers, Ms. Gainor, the eighth grade Social Studies teacher was involved in this process.

22 Interventions Continued The basic skills were taught in the traditional manner with a streamlined curriculum and students were tested for fundamentals. The basic skills were taught in the traditional manner with a streamlined curriculum and students were tested for fundamentals. Based upon the inventory test results the class was divided into eight groups. Based upon the inventory test results the class was divided into eight groups. Each group was assigned activities according to the intelligence it represents. Each group was assigned activities according to the intelligence it represents. The teacher evaluated the intellectual product produced by the student. The teacher evaluated the intellectual product produced by the student. Both groups were tested for higher cognitive skills as defined by Bloom’s Taxonomy and MI activities were implemented. Both groups were tested for higher cognitive skills as defined by Bloom’s Taxonomy and MI activities were implemented.

23 Data Collection Data Source #1Data Source #2Data Source #3Data Source #4 MI SurveyPre and Post testsClassroom Visitations District Interim Assessments

24 Data Analysis Results of MI Survey – 4 th & 6 th Period

25 Data Analysis Results of October Interim Assessment (pre-test) Results of April Interim Assessment (post-test)

26 Findings/Results Improved communication with all of our students occurred by addressing them in their dominant MI learning preference. Improved communication with all of our students occurred by addressing them in their dominant MI learning preference. Proven positive changes have occurred because of our delivery system and curriculum in individuals and the class as a group. Proven positive changes have occurred because of our delivery system and curriculum in individuals and the class as a group. Students stated that they were more interested in the curriculum due to the teacher addressing their dominant MI learning preference. Students stated that they were more interested in the curriculum due to the teacher addressing their dominant MI learning preference. Negative behavior decreased over the course of the study. Negative behavior decreased over the course of the study.

27 Implications/Recommendations As a result of our action research, professional development sessions will focus on the role multiple intelligences play in cognitive learning. As a result of our action research, professional development sessions will focus on the role multiple intelligences play in cognitive learning. Teachers will identify their own multiple intelligences through MI survey. Teachers will identify their own multiple intelligences through MI survey. At the beginning of the school year, all teachers will administer a MI test to their students, in which students’ MI will be identified. At the beginning of the school year, all teachers will administer a MI test to their students, in which students’ MI will be identified. Differentiated instruction will be geared towards students’ MI. This individualized instruction will compliment the intellectual needs of the students, thus improving student achievement. Differentiated instruction will be geared towards students’ MI. This individualized instruction will compliment the intellectual needs of the students, thus improving student achievement. Test, change and improve our teaching to adjust to changing populations. Test, change and improve our teaching to adjust to changing populations.

28 References Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum. Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum. Costa, A. (2000). Teaching for Intelligence II: A Collection of Articles. Glenview, IL: Pearson Professional Development. Costa, A. (2000). Teaching for Intelligence II: A Collection of Articles. Glenview, IL: Pearson Professional Development. Diaz-Lefebvre, R. (2004). Multiple Intelligences, Learning for Understanding, and Creative Assessment: Some Pieces to the Puzzle of Learning. Teachers College Record, Vol. 106, #1. Diaz-Lefebvre, R. (2004). Multiple Intelligences, Learning for Understanding, and Creative Assessment: Some Pieces to the Puzzle of Learning. Teachers College Record, Vol. 106, #1. Pokey, S. (2003). Multiple Intelligence for Every Classroom, Intervention in School and Clinic, Vol. 39, #2. Pokey, S. (2003). Multiple Intelligence for Every Classroom, Intervention in School and Clinic, Vol. 39, #2.


Download ppt "Carol City Middle School Superintendent’s Urban Principal Initiative 2007-2008 Addressing Multiple Intelligence to Increase Student Achievement Team Members."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google