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0 District Focused Professional Learning in Mathematics and Science
3rd Nine Weeks 2009 Grade 3 Content Overview Notes: Welcome. My name is _____ and my colleagues are ______. We will serve as your facilitators for today’s session. The purpose of this session is to provide a Content Overview for the Third Nine Weeks with a focus on inquiry and questioning strategies and the impact those practices have on student achievement. “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.”  ~Native American Proverb

1 Agenda Session Goals and Ground Rules Overview of :
Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Unit 6: Interdependence and Pollution Model lesson : Unit 6- Interdependence and Pollution Provide opportunities to share ideas and best instructional practices in science instruction Embed interactive technology, differentiation, and questioning strategies

2 Session Goals Provide a content overview of the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) Quarter 3 Grade 3: Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Unit 6: Interdependence –Pollution/Conservation Discuss the rigor of knowledge and skills expected in each GPS unit Notes: Review the Session Goals.

3 Session: Ground Rules Respect the value of each individual’s contribution No sidebars Share the air Honor time limits Participate and take ownership No cell phones or checking Parking Lot Notes: Review Ground Rules.

4 APS Resources Locations
Math & Science Resources SRT-4 Resources

5 CRCT 2009: Grade 3 Science 70% 69% 67% 67% 65% 65% Earth Science
Q1 Grade 1 Science District-Focused Mathematics and Science Professional Learning CRCT 2009: Grade 3 Science 70% 69% 67% 67% 65% 65% Ask participants to reflect on the data. Think, Pair, Share with elbow partners on what they notice. Share out. What surprises you about this data? What does not surprise you? Is this what you expected for your students? Why or why not? How would you strategically plan to strengthen our weak strands while building and accelerating our participants’ strengths? 1 = Earth Science 2 = Physical Science 3. = Life Science Earth Science Physical Science Life Science Atlanta Public Schools

6 CRCT 2009: Grade 3 Science 48% 42% 33% 32% 25% 20% Needs Improvement
Q1 Grade 1 Science District-Focused Mathematics and Science Professional Learning CRCT 2009: Grade 3 Science 48% 42% 33% 32% 25% 20% Ask participants to reflect on the data. Think, Pair, Share with elbow partners on what they notice. Share out. What surprises you about this data? What does not surprise you? Is this what you expected for your participants? Why? How would you strategically plan to strengthen our weak strands while building and accelerating our participants’ strengths? 1 = Needs Improvement 2 = Meets Criteria 3 = Exceeds Needs Improvement Meets Criteria Exceeds Atlanta Public Schools

7 What To Look For Provide examples of how the 5 categories were addressed in the lesson. Categories: Managing the Learning Environment Learner Engagement Differentiated Instruction Questioning Strategies Technology Integration Discuss what participants need to look for in the lesson. Focus on questioning strategies.

8 There’s More to Teaching Science
Read the article on your table. As a table group, locate some of the APS 26 Instructional practices outlined in the poem. Discuss how you can work to make sure that these items are implemented in your labs and other science activities.

9 What do you know about habitats?
Think about the different habitats that you can find in Georgia. On your own or with friends, make a list of five different habitats in Georgia. Now pick one of those five habitats from your list and describe five more habitats contained within that single habitat. (Hint: Think about the habitats of small organisms like reptiles and insects.) Have participants work in their table groups to complete this as an opening exercise to the Unit 5 materials.

10 Habitats Coastal Piedmont
Ocean – underground mtn, fish of deep sea, snail, sea anenome Mountains – cave, gorge, stream, foothills, lake, soil valleys Marsh/Swamp – Forest/Woodlands- trees, dirt, caves, plants

11 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Standard S3L1
Participants will investigate the habitats of different organisms and the dependence of organisms on their habitat. Elements: a. Differentiate between habitats of Georgia (mountains, marsh/swamp, coast, Piedmont, Atlantic Ocean) and the organisms that live there. b. Identify features of green plants that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia. c. Identify features of animals that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia. d. Explain what will happen to an organism if the habitat is changed. Notes: Read the standard and elements.

12 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Enduring Understandings
1. For any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. 2. A habitat provides the optimum conditions for the organism to survive. 3. Different organisms live in different areas in Georgia (mountains, marsh/swamps, coast, Piedmont, Atlantic Ocean). 4. Organisms include all living things such as plants, animals, fungi, and microorganisms. Notes: Discuss the Enduring Understandings.

13 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Enduring Understandings
5. Plants have features that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia. 6. Animals have certain features that allow/help them to live and thrive in different regions. 7. Changes in a habitat force the organisms living there to die, change/adapt, or move. 8. Organisms interact with one another in many ways including providing food to create a habitat. Notes: Discuss the Enduring Understandings.

14 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Essential Questions
1.What is a habitat? 2. How are regions in Georgia different? 3. How do the characteristics of the habitat determine the organisms that live there? 4. How are Georgia habitats different from other habitats? 5. How do the features of a plant help it survive in a certain region of Georgia? 6. How do an animal’s features and/or characteristics allow it to live and thrive in its habitat? 7. How do changes in a habitat affect the organisms living there? Notes: Discuss the Essential Questions.

15 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Essential Questions
Habitats: How does a piedmont/swamp/ocean differ from other habitats? What characteristics are found in a piedmont/swamp/ocean? How do these characteristics interrelate to form a piedmont/swamp/ocean? What plants and animals would be found in a piedmont/swamp/ocean habitat? How can a piedmont/swamp/ocean habitat be affected by natural causes and by man? Notes: Discuss the Essential Questions.

16 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Essential Questions
Georgia Habitats: What characteristics make piedmont/swamp/southern Atlantic Ocean unique in Georgia habitats? Why do certain plants and animals survive and grow in Georgia's piedmont/swamp/Atlantic Oceans? How can Georgia’s piedmont/swamp/ocean habitat be affected by natural causes and by man? Notes: Discuss the Essential Questions.

17 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Misconceptions
Proper Conceptions All plants and animals can live in any part of the state. For any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. Changes in an organism’s habit are sometimes beneficial to it and sometimes harmful. Animals and plants can adapt to changes in a habitat. ??? Notes: Proper Conception: Some plants and animals cannot adapt to changes so they either move away or die. How might this be explained or illustrated to your class? Ask participants for examples of where they have encountered student misconceptions about plants and animals and how they have taught the material before or addressed a particular misconception.

18 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Concepts
Georgia has many different habitats. Notes:

19 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Vocabulary
Organism Mountain Marsh/swamp Coast (coastal plains) Piedmont Atlantic Ocean Ridge and Valley Appalachian Plateau Notes: Briefly review vocabulary.

20 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Tasks
S3L1. Identify green plants, fungi (mushrooms), and animals present on the school grounds and around your home. Make a list of the aspects of their habitat that are necessary for the organisms to survive. Remember to include organisms that live in fresh water or salt water environments if you live near lakes, rivers, or the ocean. Research green plants, fungi (mushrooms) and animals that live in other regions of Georgia. Using informational resources including maps, match animals and plants with their homes (areas in Georgia where they live: mountains, marsh/swamp, coast, Piedmont, Atlantic Ocean). Notes: Briefly review the tasks.

21 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Tasks
Contact other third graders in Georgia and share your lists of green plants, fungi (mushrooms) and animals and their habitats that live in your area with them. Ask them to share their lists with you. Compare and contrast the lists to determine similarities and differences. Write an illustrated story telling what you found out about the organisms in your area, such as where they live, what they consume, and what external features the animals or plants have that enable them to live where they do. Use what you know about other areas in Georgia to conclude if the organisms could live in those other habitats. Notes: Briefly review the tasks. Technology Notes: Task 1 could be done via e-pals with group in GA or with a class blog or wiki site that another school would have access to as well to share their lists. Task 2: Consider using PhotoStory, PPT, iMovie or other tool to have students narrate and complete the task

22 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Tasks
Identify external features of animals that allow them to live and thrive in different regions (cold, warm, wet, dry, etc.). Explain why certain animals need to live in a certain region due to their life cycles. External features may include but are not limited to Body covering Size and relative scale of body parts Movement Food gathering Notes: Briefly review the tasks. Some ideas may include a role-play or skit.

23 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Tasks
Choose an organism that lives in a place other than Georgia. Do a report about that organism, its needs, its habitat, and why, based on its needs and features, it lives somewhere other than Georgia. For example, penguins do not live in Georgia except in zoos or animal parks. You would find out why penguins are not native to Georgia, what it needs to live, and its habitat. Visit a zoo or botanical garden and find out what accommodations in food, environmental conditions, and habitat the caretakers had to make to keep exotic organisms alive in Georgia. Notes: Briefly review the tasks.

24 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Tasks
Identify external features of green plants and fungi (mushrooms) that enable them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia (mountains, swamps/marshes, coasts, fresh water, Atlantic Ocean, and Piedmont). Seeds, cones, flowers Leaf structure (leaf shape, thickness, etc.) Size Shape Compile information into a research display of different plants and animals and their external features that help them thrive in different kinds of places. Use maps to show locations. Notes: Briefly review the tasks.

25 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Tasks
Choose an organism that has unusual features. Do a report about that organism, its needs, and why, based on its needs and features, it lives in a specific habitat. Produce a display (diorama, multimedia presentation, brochure, etc.) about external features of organisms. For example, you could compile a brochure about beaks or feet of different birds. You could do a presentation about different leaves or fungi. Notes: Briefly review the tasks.

26 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Essential Labs
Saving Water pp (Use with Pages ) Keeping Warm pp (Use with Pages ) Observe An Environment pp (Use with Pages ) Plant And Animal Homes pp (Use with Pages ) Changing The Environment pp (Use with Pages )

27 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Culminating Tasks: Zoo (Part 1)
Goal: To help develop a zoo that will have a sample of the plants and animals from all the habitat regions of Georgia. Role: You are a biologist sent to find out what kinds of plants and animals live in each of the five habitat regions and what adaptations they have to live in those regions. Audience: General Public Notes: Activity Idea: - Find related websites to guide the research and action plan. Find a way to state the need for an additional exhibit at the zoo especially for the endangered species. Have the participants research local plant or animal habitats that are endangered or in trouble and draw up an action plan for saving those habitats. A local endangered habitat may be large or small. It could be a local stream, a patch of grass in the school yard that has lost its vegetation because kids are walking on it, or a tree that is in danger of being cut down.   An action plan may be a letter-writing or campaign to local media and politicians, it could be a public awareness campaign at the school or in the community, or it might involve organizing a clean up of a habitat.

28 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Culminating Tasks: Zoo (Part 2)
Scenario: Build a zoo that will house samples of both plants and animals from the different regions of Georgia. Find out about the plants and animals that live in those regions and the features that they have that allow them to thrive there. Make a list of what you will need to include in your zoo to insure their survival. Product: A drawing of the zoo showing what conditions your area would have to have in order for the plants and animals from that region to survive there. A report on the plants and animals from your region. How could this be extended for Level 3 students? – wait for suggestions Possible Answers: Include a special exhibit of exotic animals that are not native to Georgia – what do they need to thrive in the zoo Create actual models of the zoo For IB schools, choose a country (with regions different from GA) that speaks your IB language countries and design a zoo for that area Research environmental positives and negatives of zoos

29 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Culminating Tasks: Exhibit
Goal: Your goal is to create an exhibit for the Georgia Wildlife Federation to show the regions of Georgia and the plant and animal life that is indigenous to each habitat. Role: You are part of a team selected by your teacher to create an exhibit for the Georgia Wildlife Expo. Audience: Spectators from all across the state, Judges of Georgia Wildlife Federation Contest Similar to the zoo activity, this allows for more creativity and flexibility on the students' part. They may use technology in form of PPT, make a movie, or even a music video with self-created lyrics about the regions’ habitations

30 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Culminating Tasks: Exhibit
Scenario: – Your teacher has entered the class in a contest sponsored by the Georgia Wildlife Federation. You are to follow the rules and guidelines of the contest in order to create an exhibit. Rules and Guidelines for the Contest are as follows: All work must be student created and original. Information presented must be valid. There must be visual representations of plants and animals in their habitats Product: The purpose of this project is to show the plant and animal life within each of the habitats of Georgia.

31 Unit 6: Interdependence – Pollution/Conservation
Standard: S3L2 Participants will recognize the effects of pollution and humans on the environment. Elements:  Explain the effects of pollution (such as littering) to the habitats of plants and animals. Identify ways to protect the environment. Conservation of resources Recycling of materials

32 Unit 6: Enduring Understandings
There are harmful effects of pollution and various ways to protect the environment from pollution.

33 Unit 6: Essential Questions
1. How do I identify distinguish, and correct effects of pollution? 2. What are the effects of pollution on plants and their habitats? 3. What are the effects of pollution on animals and their habitats? 4. How does conservation protect our environment? 5. How does recycling help reduce pollution?

34 Unit 6: Misconceptions Misconceptions Proper Conceptions
Pollution comes only from manufacturing processes and machines. Pollution comes from many sources. We can recycle everything. Trash disappears. Some objects are not recyclable. I do not pollute. We don’t have a problem with pollution. Not all trash can be recycled. Pollution is everyone’s problem. Pollution comes from everyone. All water sources are clean and can be used for drinking water. You should not drink water from sources you do not know are safe (lakes, creeks, rivers) Some common misconceptions are addressed here. These are some that the students may or may not already have. If they arise during instruction then we can find ways to address them, however, if they don’t arise then we wouldn’t want to create them. Additionally, there may be other misconceptions that we find after instruction that will need to be addressed as well.

35 Unit 6: Concepts Pollution changes a living thing’s habitat: water, air, land.

36 Unit 6: Vocabulary Pollution air Pollution land Pollution water
Habitats Environment Aerosol ozone layer Littering land Conservation acid Rain water Reference word walls

37 Unit 6: Tasks S3L2. Research other ways to help the environment such as conservation of resources and recycling. Look around your school and home for ways to help conserve resources and recycle products. Make posters to display around the school informing other participants of the need to conserve water and land resources by careful use and recycling. Celebrate Earth Day in April by sharing what you have done to help “save the planet.”

38 Unit 6: Tasks S3L2. Sometimes pollution such as littering changes an organism’s habitat. Anchor a piece of paper on a grassy area on the school ground. Leave the paper for two weeks. Remove the paper and observe the impact the paper had on the grass. Develop a plan to help clean up the area so that the organisms in the area are more likely to survive. Publicize your plan and write letters to encourage others to help with the plan. Test your plan and keep a record of the number of organisms or the condition of the organisms before and after implementing the plan.

39 Unit 6: Essential Labs Mining Resources Pollution And Plants
pp (Use with Pages ) Pollution And Plants pp (Use with Pages ) Taking A Look At Trash pp (Use with Pages )

40 Unit 6: Culminating Task
Goal: Sharing with others the ways you’ve learned to conserve resources to protect our environment Role: You have been hired by the Environmental Protection Agency to design a poster to present to the School Board to use for the county to teach children how to protect the environment. Audience: Your School Board members and the members of the EPA will decide if your poster reflects pollution prevention. Note: We do this task at the conclusion of the model lesson.

41 Unit 6: Culminating Task
Scenario: You must present your poster to the board members and EPA. You must show evidence that you understand conservation, recycling, reusing and reducing waste. Product: You will make posters to display around the school informing other participants of the need to conserve water and land resources by careful use and recycling. Standard: You will write a plan for your poster to explain how to protect your environment using recycling, reducing, reusing, and conservation. You will use the plan to create your poster. You will include data to support your information. You will provide will organize ideas and present them neatly using colorful visual graphics. Your written information must be accurate based on knowledge gained from the unit study.

42 Unit 6: Interdependence – Pollution/Conservation -- Literature
1. Just A Dream – Chris Van Allsburg, (Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990) 2. The Giving Tree – Shel Silverstein, (Harper Collins Children’s Books, 1964) 3. The Paper Bag Prince – Colin Thompson

43 Unit 6: Planning Questions
What is the lesson about? What do they already know? What about this group? Do you have manipulatives? Did you give a pre-assessment? Depending on the feel of the session – may want a short break here! 7/25/2008 Q1 Grade Kindergarten Mathematics Content Overview 43

44 Model Lesson Unit 6: Interdependence/Pollution
During the past hundred years, due to new technologies, the world has changed in many ways. Some changes have improved the quality of life and health for many people. Others have been quite detrimental to the environment and the health of the inhabitants. Even technologies that are beneficial still may come at a cost to the environment. Pollution is a problem that we all face and we all need to work together to reduce. We will be using the 5E (engage, explore, explain, elaborate, evaluate) model for a lesson and some of the items may take more than one class period to complete. The purpose is showcase the different types of activities thtat can be included in the model for student instruction. Third Grade

45 Engage: Pollution Reflect on the following questions:
What is pollution? Why is pollution bad for the environment? How can pollution travel? Why types of things pollute water? What types of things pollute air? Have participants think a few moments and jot down a few thoughts about the questions on the slide. Give them 3-5 minutes to complete the task.

46 Engage: Pollution As you watch the video would you revise your answers: Show the video and then return to the previous slide to discuss the answers for about 5 minutes. Notes: Discuss the answers on the previous slide What is pollution? Pollution in our oceans, lakes, rivers and streams is a very serious matter. Pollution is when we add things to the ground, the air, or the water that will make it dirty or will bring harm to the life in and around it. People often dump liquids into oceans, lakes, rivers and streams. Some of these liquids will mix with water; others will not. Share ideas about examples of pollution. Then try to come up with a definition. Help them see that pollution is making something dirty or unsafe for life. Lead into thinking about water pollution. Talk about our oceans, lakes, rivers, and streams. What have they heard or read about pollution in these water bodies? Do they ever think about whether or not the water they swim in is safe? Have they ever been concerned about the fish we eat being poisoned and harmed from living in polluted water?

47 Engage: What is pollution?
Notes: These pictures represent different forms of pollution. Can you name them? Discuss the displayed pictures of water, air, and land pollution. Have participants identify what is wrong in each of the pictures displayed. Write the participants responses underneath each of the pictures. Lead into a focus on the water picture. Lead into thinking about water pollution. Talk about our oceans, lakes, rivers, and streams. What have they heard or read about pollution in these water bodies? Do they ever think about whether or not the water they swim in is safe? Have they ever been concerned about the fish we eat being poisoned and harmed from living in polluted water? 2. Which liquids mix with water? One big problem is that too often our oceans, lakes, rivers and streams can look like they are safe and clean when in fact they are not. Some of the solids and liquids we are dumping into water will mix up with the water so we cannot see them with just our eyes. Some things we put into water will not mix and we can see evidence that they are there. What we cannot see is a big problem! 3. Which liquids won't mix with water? Today we will do an experiment by making an "ocean in a bottle." We will try mixing different liquids with water to see what will and will not mix. In particular, we will see if oil or detergent will mix with water. Do you think we should drink in water with oil and/or detergent in it? Are these two liquids harmful to plant life, fish or other creatures? Oil and detergents are two common liquids that get dumped into our waters.

48 Standard: S3L2 Elements:
Students will recognize the effects of pollution and humans on the environment. Elements:  Explain the effects of pollution (such as littering) to the habitats of plants and animals. Identify ways to protect the environment. Conservation of resources Recycling of materials

49 Essential Q & Objectives
EQ: What are the effects of pollution on plants and their habitats? What are the effects of pollution on animals and their habitats? Objectives: Students will be able to identify types of materials that will or will not mix with water. Students will be able to describe the effects of pollution in water to the environment. Students will be able to identify the ways that pollution travels.

50 Explore: Literature Connection
Follow the Water from Brook to Ocean by Arthur Dorros Explores water's journey, how it shapes the earth, and why it is important to keep it clean Grades K-4 Whole group

51 Explore: Technology Hotlist:
Teacher Resources Station 1 (see if we can use Mac Lab) Each station will last 10 minutes Explain slides before separating into groups.

52 Explore: Technology Ocean Pollution

53 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Additional Websites
Georgia Wildlife Federation: Georgia Museum of Natural History Science Box Program: Georgia Wildlife Web: National Wildlife Federation: The New Georgia Encyclopedia website (www.newgeorgiaencyclopedia.org)

54 Unit 5: Habitats of Georgia Additional Websites

55 Explore: Dump & Clump Select timekeeper and scribe for each group of 4 or 5. Brainstorm all the words related to pollution for 2 minutes. The scribe of the group will record them on the index cards provided. Organize the words in a way the group decides. Write a sentence or two to justify your organization. Station 2 – index cards Have participants work in groups of 4 or less to complete the task.

56 Explore: Bottle Ocean Bring back to whole group… Notes: Background
Pollution in our oceans, lakes, rivers and streams is a very serious matter. We must be careful about what we dump into our oceans, lakes, rivers and streams. Many of the liquids we are putting into our water systems will make it harmful for the life in and around it. Too often, water can look like it is safe and clean when it actually is not. People often dump liquids into oceans, lakes, rivers and streams. Some of these liquids will mix with water; others will not. Liquids that will mix with each other are called miscible. Liquids that will not mix with each other are called immiscible. Discuss in small groups and whole group. 1. Which liquids mix with water? One big problem is that too often our oceans, lakes, rivers and streams can look like they are safe and clean when in fact they are not. Some of the solids and liquids we are dumping into water will mix up with the water so we cannot see them with just our eyes. Some things we put into water will not mix and we can see evidence that they are there. What we cannot see is a big problem! 2. Which liquids won't mix with water? Today we will do an experiment by making an "ocean in a bottle." We will try mixing different liquids with water to see what will and will not mix. In particular, we will see if oil or detergent will mix with water. Do you think we should drink water with oil and/or detergent in it? Are these two liquids harmful to plant life, fish or other creatures? Oil and detergents are two common liquids that get dumped into our waters. Disposal:  Pour the mineral oil back into its original bottle.  Pour water down the drain.

57 Explain: Video Causes of Water Pollution
The way we use water results in pollution which damages the environment. Sewage, chemical waste, and runoff place toxic substances into water sources. Oil spills are especially dangerous to water because they spread very fast and cause severe damage to surrounding ecosystems. Notes: This video clip is for the participants background information. Ask them to look for the definition of matter, property and physical properties. In small groups, have them discuss ways to help participants understand the concepts. Changes in the Properties of Matter: Physical and Chemical. 100% Educational Videos (2003). Retrieved December 17, 2008, from Discovery Education:

58 Explain: Science Notebook
Explain in your own words or draw a picture explaining why additives in water create pollution. Can all additives be physically changed into their primary components?

59 Elaborate: Water Pollution
Repeat the Bottle Ocean experiment using different kinds of liquids that are commonly put into our lakes and oceans. See what liquids will and will not mix with water. Find out where pollutants come from, what harm they may cause to life and the water, and how we are trying to avoid this pollution or clean it up. Research a particular ocean, lake or river. Find out how “healthy” the water is. What kinds of pollution concerns are there? They may find out about malformed critters that are linked to pollution. Or there may be evidence that certain plant life or other life is in jeopardy or even becoming extinct because of pollution. Notes: If you would like to further extend the activity here are some suggestions for items to do.

60 Plastic In the Water Video Clip of Finding Nemo?

61 Plastic Plastic products are everywhere in today's world.
They may be convenient, but they have a large impact on the environment.  Notes: All plastics come from petroleum, most contain potentially harmful chemical additives, and many are difficult to recycle.  Plastic doesn't decompose and litters the earth

62 Plastic in the Ocean Garbage has been discarded into the oceans for as long as humans have sailed the seven seas or lived on seashores or near waterways flowing into the sea. Notes:

63 Plastic bags kill animals
About 100,000 animals such as dolphins, turtles whales, penguins are killed every year due to plastic bags. About 100,000 animals such as dolphins, turtles whales, penguins are killed every year due to plastic bags. Many animals ingest plastic bags, mistaking them for food, and therefore die. And worse, the ingested plastic bag remains intact even after the death and decomposition of the animal. Thus, it lies around in the landscape where another victim may ingest it.

64 Evaluate: Pollution Solutions
Notes: Have participants take a “pollution walk” around the school grounds. Observe and record any type of pollution found in the surrounding air, land, or water. Place a world, national, or state map on the floor. Have participants throw litter on the map. Discuss their feelings about the trash and the effects it would have on the world. Bring out a broom as an example of a simple “machine” that can be used to clean up the trash. Ask if there is a more complex machine that would make the cleanup easier. Bring out a vacuum cleaner. Would this be even more efficient? Might it harm or destroy the map?

65 Evaluate: Pollution Solutions
Your team will create an imaginary machine that will clean up plastics in the ocean. Notes: “If machines are contributors to pollution, can machines be used to clean up pollution?” Have the participants work in small groups to brainstorm types of machines that are used to clean up or prevent pollution. Ask the participants to name the character traits that are represented in their concern for reducing pollution. Have each participants design and sketch an imaginary machine that might be used to help reduce pollution caused by plastics in the ocean. Then give the machine a creative name such as “Ocean Skimmer. ” Provide the materials to create models of the machines. Each participants should write a brief summary to explain his/her machine, how it would work, and how it would reduce or cleanup pollution. Your team will create an imaginary machine that will clean up plastics in the ocean.

66 Evaluate: Pollution Solution
GRASP Goal: Understand importance of sharing ways to conserve and protect environment with others Role: You have been hired by EPA to design poster for school board. Audience: Your School Board members and the members of the EPA will decide if your poster reflects pollution prevention

67 Evaluate Standard: You will write a plan and create a poster to explain how to protect your environment using recycling, reducing, reusing, and conservation. Product: You will make posters to display around the school informing other students of the need to conserve water and land resources by careful use and recycling. You will include data to support your information. You will provide organized ideas and present them neatly using colorful visual graphics. Your written information must be accurate based on knowledge gained from the unit study

68 Evaluate: CRCT Practice

69 Debrief How do you think it went?/What did you accomplish today?
Do you think participants/participants got the concept? Did you meet your goals and your student/participant needs? Provide examples of how the 5 categories were addressed in the lesson. Categories: Managing the Learning Environment Learner Engagement Differentiated Instruction Questioning Strategies Technology Integration

70 Reflection Which strategies in this session are you most likely to use? How would you adapt the strategies in this session to suit your needs? What else do you need to know?

71 Contact Information


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