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A Well-Oiled Machine Understanding and Utilizing the Personality Types in Your Peer Education Group Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist Tad Spencer,

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Presentation on theme: "A Well-Oiled Machine Understanding and Utilizing the Personality Types in Your Peer Education Group Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist Tad Spencer,"— Presentation transcript:

1 A Well-Oiled Machine Understanding and Utilizing the Personality Types in Your Peer Education Group Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist Tad Spencer, MA, TAS Understanding and Utilizing the Personality Types in Your Peer Education Group Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist Tad Spencer, MA, TAS

2 Questions to Start…  Have you experienced different personality types in your groups?  Could you share some comments about working with different personalities?  What do you need to learn today to help you do your job better?  Have you experienced different personality types in your groups?  Could you share some comments about working with different personalities?  What do you need to learn today to help you do your job better?

3 Overview  Myers-Briggs Type Indicator  Discussion  The Alcoholic Family and Personality  Other Personal Experience  Other Tools  Fitting it Together  Myers-Briggs Type Indicator  Discussion  The Alcoholic Family and Personality  Other Personal Experience  Other Tools  Fitting it Together

4 Myers-Briggs Type Indicator  Carl Jung’s theory of psychological types  No “wrong” types or preferences  Wide range of usage  Provides assistance not absolutes  16 possible personality combinations in four-letter combinations  Carl Jung’s theory of psychological types  No “wrong” types or preferences  Wide range of usage  Provides assistance not absolutes  16 possible personality combinations in four-letter combinations

5 History of the Myers-Briggs  Developed by Isabel Briggs Myers and Katharine Briggs in 1942  Most widely used personality instrument - 2 million administrations each year  4,000 research studies, articles and dissertations written on MBTI  Many instruments based on MBTI (Keirsey Temperment Indicator, The Hale Test)  Developed by Isabel Briggs Myers and Katharine Briggs in 1942  Most widely used personality instrument - 2 million administrations each year  4,000 research studies, articles and dissertations written on MBTI  Many instruments based on MBTI (Keirsey Temperment Indicator, The Hale Test)

6 How One is Energized  Extraversion (E)  Energized by external world and other people  Acts first, thinks later (ready, fire, aim)  Seeks social contact  Introversion (I)  Energized by oneself and inner thoughts  Thinks first, acts later (aim, aim, aim…)  Seeks privacy  Extraversion (E)  Energized by external world and other people  Acts first, thinks later (ready, fire, aim)  Seeks social contact  Introversion (I)  Energized by oneself and inner thoughts  Thinks first, acts later (aim, aim, aim…)  Seeks privacy

7 How One Gathers Information  Sensing (S)  Relies on concrete evidence and experience  Looks for facts  Asks, “What is real?”  Intuition (N)  Relies on abstract, symbolic awareness  Looks for possibilities  Asks, “What might be?”  Sensing (S)  Relies on concrete evidence and experience  Looks for facts  Asks, “What is real?”  Intuition (N)  Relies on abstract, symbolic awareness  Looks for possibilities  Asks, “What might be?”

8 How One Makes Decisions  Thinking (T)  Situations are evaluated objectively based on information and criteria  Logical analysis  Asks, “Is it true or valid?”  Feeling (F)  Situations are evaluated based on values and worth  Sympathy  Asks, “Is it important to me?”  Thinking (T)  Situations are evaluated objectively based on information and criteria  Logical analysis  Asks, “Is it true or valid?”  Feeling (F)  Situations are evaluated based on values and worth  Sympathy  Asks, “Is it important to me?”

9 Ways of Organizing One’s Life  Judging (J)  Plans ahead, seeks closure, follows a particular path, likes organization  Prefers deadlines  J = T or F is a person’s dominant function  Perceiving (P)  Keeps options open, is okay with the spontaneous, rigid organization not necessary  Prefers flexibility  P = S or N is a person’s dominant function  Judging (J)  Plans ahead, seeks closure, follows a particular path, likes organization  Prefers deadlines  J = T or F is a person’s dominant function  Perceiving (P)  Keeps options open, is okay with the spontaneous, rigid organization not necessary  Prefers flexibility  P = S or N is a person’s dominant function

10 Combine the Letters Remember: preference, not abilities  E or I  S or N  T or F  J or P  Example = INFJ  Characteristics: loyal, committed, compassionate, creative, intense, deep, determined, conceptual, sensitive, reserved Remember: preference, not abilities  E or I  S or N  T or F  J or P  Example = INFJ  Characteristics: loyal, committed, compassionate, creative, intense, deep, determined, conceptual, sensitive, reserved

11 Small Group Discussion Look at the chart of characteristics  Are there things that strike you as interesting?  What traits have you seen most in your peer groups? Which would you like to see?  How do you see various elements fitting into your group?  How do the elements relate to peer education in general? Look at the chart of characteristics  Are there things that strike you as interesting?  What traits have you seen most in your peer groups? Which would you like to see?  How do you see various elements fitting into your group?  How do the elements relate to peer education in general?

12 Special Situations  Some peer educators may have rich personal experience that contributes to personality and interactions  Alcoholic Family  Personal Experience (eating disorders, drug use, etc.)  Some peer educators may have rich personal experience that contributes to personality and interactions  Alcoholic Family  Personal Experience (eating disorders, drug use, etc.)

13 The Alcoholic Family  In a chaotic family situation, different children find different ways to survive or adapt  The Hero  The Mascot  The Scapegoat  The Lost Child  In a chaotic family situation, different children find different ways to survive or adapt  The Hero  The Mascot  The Scapegoat  The Lost Child

14 The Hero  Child tries to excel in everything (school, extra-curriculars, etc.)  Believes being “good enough” will distract attention from chaos or help resolve situation  As an adult: has drive to succeed and work hard to accomplish goals; typically very intelligent  Child tries to excel in everything (school, extra-curriculars, etc.)  Believes being “good enough” will distract attention from chaos or help resolve situation  As an adult: has drive to succeed and work hard to accomplish goals; typically very intelligent

15 The Mascot  Child is typically the comedian or class clown; believes that comedy and funny behavior will distract attention from feuds and alcohol problems  As an adult: person can provide humor and levity to groups; may have a misunderstood depth of insight into human behavior  Child is typically the comedian or class clown; believes that comedy and funny behavior will distract attention from feuds and alcohol problems  As an adult: person can provide humor and levity to groups; may have a misunderstood depth of insight into human behavior

16 The Scapegoat  Child tends to be the rebel and exhibit dangerous or controversial behavior; more likely to get tattoos, piercings, or start smoking at an early age  As an adult: often fiercely independent and can provide non-traditional thinking; may have a desire to help those who are like s/he was  Child tends to be the rebel and exhibit dangerous or controversial behavior; more likely to get tattoos, piercings, or start smoking at an early age  As an adult: often fiercely independent and can provide non-traditional thinking; may have a desire to help those who are like s/he was

17 The Lost Child  Child is very quiet and tends to spend a lot of time alone or with animals, stuffed animals, or imaginary friends; may shy away from confrontation  As an adult: has a vivid imagination and creative streak; may also be a deep thinker with developed intuition; often has a “sixth sense” about potential conflict  Child is very quiet and tends to spend a lot of time alone or with animals, stuffed animals, or imaginary friends; may shy away from confrontation  As an adult: has a vivid imagination and creative streak; may also be a deep thinker with developed intuition; often has a “sixth sense” about potential conflict

18 Those with Personal Experience  Peer education may be desirable to those who want to “right a wrong” or take action that is deeply personal  Alcoholic parent alcohol education  Prior eating disorderprevention  Be mindful of histories but don’t shy away from them  Help steer them toward appropriate interventions  Peer education may be desirable to those who want to “right a wrong” or take action that is deeply personal  Alcoholic parent alcohol education  Prior eating disorderprevention  Be mindful of histories but don’t shy away from them  Help steer them toward appropriate interventions

19 Suggestions  If the student is willing, invite him/her to share experiences with peer group as educational component of meeting  Show appreciation to the student for the unique perspective  Help the student frame their passion into constructive action that will benefit others  Reiterate that peer ed is “client-focused”  If the student is willing, invite him/her to share experiences with peer group as educational component of meeting  Show appreciation to the student for the unique perspective  Help the student frame their passion into constructive action that will benefit others  Reiterate that peer ed is “client-focused”

20 Other Tools  “Strengths” books  Emphasize working with one’s strengths rather than repairing / building up weaknesses  People are happier and more productive when using strengths  Do what you do best!  “Strengths” books  Emphasize working with one’s strengths rather than repairing / building up weaknesses  People are happier and more productive when using strengths  Do what you do best!

21 Fitting it Together  Become aware of each member’s individuality and preferences  Design activities / tasks that play to preferences and strengths  Spend some time early on helping students learn about their preferences and strengths  If necessary, rethink how you work  Appreciate the diversity of thought and approach  Become aware of each member’s individuality and preferences  Design activities / tasks that play to preferences and strengths  Spend some time early on helping students learn about their preferences and strengths  If necessary, rethink how you work  Appreciate the diversity of thought and approach

22 Suggested Reading  The 16 Personality Types, Descriptions for Self-Discovery by Linda V. Berens and Dario Nardi  Type Talk: The 16 Personality Types That Determine How We Live, Love, and Work by Otto Kroeger and Janet M. Thuesen  Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type by Isabel Briggs Myers  Quick Guide to the 16 Personality Types and Career Mastery: Living with Purpose and Working Effectively by Charles R. Martin  Now, Discover Your Strengths (Hardcover) by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton  Go Put Your Strengths to Work: 6 Powerful Steps to Achieve Outstanding Performance by Marcus Buckingham  The Introvert Advantage: How to Thrive in an Extrovert World by Marti Olsen Laney  The 16 Personality Types, Descriptions for Self-Discovery by Linda V. Berens and Dario Nardi  Type Talk: The 16 Personality Types That Determine How We Live, Love, and Work by Otto Kroeger and Janet M. Thuesen  Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type by Isabel Briggs Myers  Quick Guide to the 16 Personality Types and Career Mastery: Living with Purpose and Working Effectively by Charles R. Martin  Now, Discover Your Strengths (Hardcover) by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton  Go Put Your Strengths to Work: 6 Powerful Steps to Achieve Outstanding Performance by Marcus Buckingham  The Introvert Advantage: How to Thrive in an Extrovert World by Marti Olsen Laney

23 What questions do you have? What questions do you have?

24 Contact Information  Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist  Tad Spencer, MA, TAS  Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, Licensed Psychologist  Tad Spencer, MA, TAS


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