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Crossing the Rubricon Mindy Yale, PSAV Instructor QEP Implementation Team Development Day, Fall 2014 “Crossing the Rubicon”, Simon Kozhin 2001. Oil on.

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Presentation on theme: "Crossing the Rubricon Mindy Yale, PSAV Instructor QEP Implementation Team Development Day, Fall 2014 “Crossing the Rubicon”, Simon Kozhin 2001. Oil on."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Crossing the Rubricon Mindy Yale, PSAV Instructor QEP Implementation Team Development Day, Fall 2014 “Crossing the Rubicon”, Simon Kozhin Oil on Canvas.

3 Assessment in the Feedback Generation

4 Authentic Assessment: An instrument that measures the degree to which a student is able to demonstrate the practical application of knowledge based on a set of criteria determined by faculty to be meaningful and useful.

5 Memorization v. Practical Application 100% of students met the Benchmark. 78% of students met the benchmark.

6 Holisti c Score of 5: Student response soundly analyzes and interprets relevant information Student reaches a relevant conclusion and soundly demonstrates that the conclusion is based on a reasoning process Student response soundly demonstrates the skills required to evaluate and explain Score of 3: Student response includes analysis and interpretation, but the response is somewhat incomplete or inaccurate Student reaches a relevant conclusion but the reasoning process is somewhat incomplete or inaccurate Student evaluates the information and explains the results, but the response is somewhat incomplete or inaccurate Score of 1: Student does not analyze or interpret the information Student does not provide a relevant conclusion nor demonstrate a reasoning process Student does not evaluate or explain the information QEP / Critical Thinking Rubric To be used for scoring student responses on scenarios to measure QEP Outcomes 1-3. Unacceptable (1) The student does not demonstrate the skills required for the outcome. Developing (3) The demonstration of skills required for the outcome is present, but needs improvement. Exemplary (5) The demonstration of skills required for the outcome is excellent. Outcome 1 Students are able to analyze and interpret relevant information. Student does not analyze or interpret the information. Student response includes analysis and interpretation, but the response is somewhat incomplete or inaccurate. Student response soundly analyzes and interprets the relevant information. Outcome 2 Students are able to reach conclusions based on a demonstrated reasoning process. Student does not provide a relevant conclusion nor demonstrate a reasoning process. Student reaches a relevant conclusion, but the reasoning process is somewhat incomplete or inaccurate. Student reaches a relevant conclusion and soundly demonstrates that the conclusion is based on a reasoning process. Outcome 3 Students are able to evaluate and explain relevant information. Student does not evaluate or explain the information. Student evaluates the information and explains the results, but the response is somewhat incomplete or inaccurate. Student response soundly demonstrates the skills required to evaluate and explain. Analytic

7 Provides Specific Feedback Summative Formative

8 Promotes Student Accountability

9 Rubrics are Objective, Efficient and CYA Clarify requirements prior to assessment Identify at-risk students early on Assist at-risk students with specific areas Document a clear communication process Deliver consistent feedback from different faculty members who independently assess the student Reduced persecution perception Chart and record student progress throughout the course Results offer easy comparison of all students in the course

10 Inefficient and Exhausting

11 Rubrics are too time consuming. False. You can’t make rubrics for math. Not True. Rubrics are standardizing. Yawn.

12 © Gerald Scarfe. Used with kind permission. Rubrics are NOT part of an administrative plot to control and oppress faculty

13 Analytic Rubric Components Subject: The standard or learning outcome being measured Criteria: Specific tasks involved in demonstrating the standard/LO Levels of Performance: Commonly 3-5 performance levels Descriptors: Clear explanation of what is required at each performance level for each criterion.

14 oKI Contestants will prepare a meal using mystery ingredients, demonstrating speed, skill and ingenuity. Rubric Subject What do you want students to be able to do?

15 Meal was cooked and plated before time ran out (speed) All mystery ingredients were incorporated (ingenuity) Taste: Ingredients were properly cooked, different tastes were harmonious and balanced. (skill) Presentation: Portion was appropriate and presentation was aesthetically appealing. (skill) Creativity: Ingredients were creatively incorporated. (skill) “Chopped” Rubric Criteria Performance activity: Contestants will prepare a meal using mystery ingredients, demonstrating speed, skill and ingenuity.

16 1. Clarify Criteria : Identify specific tasks Restaurant Employee Reliable Courteous Follows Sanitary Guidelines Restaurant Employee Arrives on-time Friendly and informative when greeting customers. Prompt and pleasant in responding to requests Follows sanitary guidelines Learning Outcome: Employee demonstrates professionalism

17 2. Establish Performance Levels NeverSometimesAlways UnacceptableDevelopingOutstanding extreme Broad range Extreme NeverRarelySometimesFrequentlyAlways UnacceptablePoorDevelopingProficientOutstanding

18 3. Provide Descriptors: Specific Characteristics of Criteria at each performance level Criteria Student management of electronic devices reflects engagement. 1: Unacceptable No attempt to be discreet, texts constantly, Phone rings repeatedly, answers phone in class. Disruptive. 5: Outstanding Student may not have one in class or Electronic Devices are always silent and stored unless required for a class activity. 3: Developing Sometimes texts, or discreetly hides cell behind purse or on lap. Phone rarely rings, and/or student apologizes for disruption.

19 4. Review/Refine Reflect to make sure that it matches what you value and what you want students to be able to do. Review with students to make sure that the expectations are clear. Ask a colleague to review and point out anything that could be further clarified. Image:

20 Self- Binding for Increased Objectivity Have student work numbered so that names are not visible Have essays typed prior to grading Grade after eating and when rested THE VOICE -- "Blind Auditions" Episode Pictured: (l-r) Preston Pohl, Adam Levine, CeeLo Green, Blake Shelton -- (Photo by: Trae Patton/NBC) Airdate: Monday, September 30 on NBC (8-10 p.m. ET) � NBC Universal, Inc. - See more at:

21 5. Grading Grading is quick when descriptors are clear and accurate. If something doesn’t appear to fit, consider revisions. Student work will reveal the strengths and weaknesses of the rubric and indicate where specific improvements could be made. Ask a colleague to grade some papers using the rubric. When there is a consensus, it is likely a solid measurement Where there is not a consensus, discuss to discover why and determine whether revisions are in order

22 6. Revisions Rubrics Evolve

23 Your rubric is ready for action! Please take a moment to use the “Rubric Presentation Analytic Rubric” to evaluate this presentation. Crossing the Rubricon 1 Unacceptable 2 Poor 3 Developing 4 Proficient 5 Outstanding The advantages of analytic rubrics were presented clearly. Not at all.I have a poor understanding of the advantages of analytic rubrics The advantages were presented but could use improvement. The advantages of analytic rubrics were presented clearly. The advantages of analytic rubrics were presented very clearly. I totally get it. All components of a rubric were constructed in class. No components were constructed or I only got as far as the topic. I have a topic, learning outcome and a page filled with possible criteria. I have a topic, learning outcome, criteria and some descriptions I constructed all components and have 3 levels of performance. Descriptors may be incomplete. I constructed all components and have 3 levels of performance with completed descriptors. The constructed Rubric is ready to implement. I chose not to construct one. My rubric is prepared to become a paper airplane or origami swan. I feel that mine needs major improvement before I can implement it. Minor refinements could be made before implementing Ready to implement! Participants are confident that they have enough information to construct and grade rubrics on their own. The information presented verbally, on PowerPoint and in the workbook was entirely insufficient. I will not cross the Rubricon. Research beyond the course materials would be required for me to feel confident to construct rubrics on my own. I am not sure if I will be able to cross the Rubricon. I received enough information but feel somewhat overwhelmed. I will feel more confident when I review the workbook on my own. I will cross the Rubricon eventually. I feel confident that I can construct a basic rubric and expect my confidence to grow through practice. I am in the midst of crossing the Rubricon. I have crossed the Rubricon! Rubric Presentation Analytic Rubric

24 Please send any feedback, comments or questions to: Mindy Yale u Thank you for participating!


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