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The Clean Water Act Objective: To restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters PHOTO OF 2007 OUTFALL AT.

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Presentation on theme: "The Clean Water Act Objective: To restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters PHOTO OF 2007 OUTFALL AT."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Clean Water Act Objective: To restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters PHOTO OF 2007 OUTFALL AT MALLARD CREEK WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY

3 Who We Are, What We Do We serve all of Mecklenburg county Provide drinking water & sanitary sewer service over 3,900 Miles of sewer pipe and over 3,900 Miles of water pipe Most treated wastewater is recycled back to the Catawba River via creeks and streams We are a non-profit enterprise fund and we do not receive tax dollars

4 How well do we do now? We safely collect, treat & recycle 99.9+% of more than 30 BILLION gallons of wastewater each year

5 Wastewater – We cannot afford to waste a drop!

6 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PROTECTION Our MISSION: protect public health & the environment Required by law to 1.Protect the Collection System 2.Protect the Sewer Workers 3.Prevent Interference or Pass-Through 4.Protect the Biosolids for beneficial reuse HOW DO WE ACHIEVE OUR GOALS? EDUCATE, EDUCATE, EDUCATE THEN ENFORCE

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8  Pollutants which create a fire or explosive hazard  Solids or viscous substances which cause an obstruction in the flow  Petroleum oil, nonbiodegradable cutting oil or mineral oil  Any wastewater having a pH lower than 6.0 pH units or greater than 12.0  Any wastewater containing pollutants which cause interference at the POTW  Any wastewater having a temperature which will inhibit biological activity at the POTW  Any pollutants which result in toxic gases, vapors, or fumes that may cause worker health and safety problems General Prohibitions

9 Local Limits  POTW Capacity – can we take the flow  POTW Treatability – can we remove it  Water Quality – is our removal rate sufficient  Land Application (Biosolids) – can we recycle the solids also  Air Quality – will we impact air

10 Most Stringent Limitations  The most stringent limitations and requirements on pretreatment of discharges to a POTW in effect, whether imposed by the city, state or federal government, shall apply. The user will be required to implement such pretreatment as necessary to comply with the applicable standards.  The most stringent limitations and requirements on pretreatment of discharges to a POTW in effect, whether imposed by the city, state or federal government, shall apply. The user will be required to implement such pretreatment as necessary to comply with the applicable standards. But, WHY???

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14 Gasoline  Gasoline is the number one source of explosions in the sewer system  One gallon of gasoline when vaporized & mixed with air has the same explosive force as 14 sticks of dynamite

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17 Current 2009 CMU investigation of oil in sewer – this is our viewing equipment after being in the line

18 bacteria magnified

19 Current CMU investigation of surfactant and color

20 There is a relationship that we do not like to think about EVERYTHING is recycled sooner or later. Pollution prevention is the best way so that we keep pollutants out of the cycle to start with.

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22 So, we can treat it (most of the time!) but….   Wastewater Treatment infrastructure is built to handle domestic sewage…anything that is higher strength than domestic sewage requires more effort to remove… and may not come out!

23 Available Remedies  Notice of Violation  Compliance Agreement  Compliance Order  Cease and Desist Order  Suspension  Termination  Civil Penalties  Public Notice  Criminal Violation  Remedies Nonexclusive

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25 The Cost of Noncompliance Should NOT be less than the Cost of Compliance

26 Environmental Management - System Protection Ink or Dye Copper Window Cleaner Soap

27 Inspectors in Action

28 Policy for discharge of cleaning water to the Sanitary Sewer  Our basic message is that any resident can place 100 gallons per day of cleaning water to their cleanout. We consider this to be the amount for normal cleaning of one to four cars.   The specific prohibitions still apply. This includes a limit on solids of 250 mg/l and Total Petroleum of 100 mg/l.  We recommend an oil sock/oil removal and grit screening for any amount of cleaning water.  We recommend an oil sock/oil removal and grit screening for any amount of cleaning water.  We are not responsible for damage to private property. You must obtain permission to discharge to the cleanout, or the facilities on site, such as mop sink or toilets.  NEVER EVER OPEN A MANHOLE.   Over 100 and less than 1000, you will need to use an oil/water separator before discharge to the cleanout. There are mobile units for this. We are not currently requiring a specific method but you must remove the oil and grit.   Over 1000 gallons per day, you will need to come in and get a Special Use Discharge permit. We will be asking you how you will pretreat the water to get the oil and grit out. We will be asking you to show us your equipment and to come back annually to show that it is maintained.  There will not be a permit fee the first year of this program.

29 Lateral Line Care – Remember who has to fix it CMU is responsible for repairs in this area Clean- out One line shown

30 If we can not resolve it, it is time to call the lawyers – please call us or come by to see us before this happens!

31 That’s all folks!  Questions ???  Call System Protection if you have any Wastewater questions


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