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A framework to move from common core to classroom practice LDC Scoring Session Puget Sound ESD - Reach Associates February 11, 2014 1.

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Presentation on theme: "A framework to move from common core to classroom practice LDC Scoring Session Puget Sound ESD - Reach Associates February 11, 2014 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 A framework to move from common core to classroom practice LDC Scoring Session Puget Sound ESD - Reach Associates February 11,

2 2

3 Outcomes Understand the 7 elements and scoring used on the LDC Rubrics Calibrate scoring Collaboratively score student work Use student work to revise and/or develop mini- tasks that meet needs of students and are aligned to instructional shifts and grade level demands of the Common Core 3

4 Norms What are some working agreements you feel would help to make today successful? 4

5 Instructional Shifts of the Common Core  Increasing rigor and relevance  Sharing responsibility of teaching reading and writing across content areas  Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and informational text  Reading, writing, speaking and listening grounded in evidence from texts  Practicing regularly with complex text and its academic vocabulary  Emphasizing 3 modes of academic writing 5

6 6

7 Silent Conversation 7

8 Why Rubrics for Scoring? 8 Should Congress repeal the ban on incandescent light bulbs set for 2014? After reading a variety of informational and persuasive texts, write an essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views.  Read the student’s final product.  Assign it a grade of A-B-C-D-F

9 How did you grade this work? Why? 9

10 LDC Rubrics – Scoring v. Grading The LDC rubric is constructed for classroom use and to provide feedback to students and teachers. It is for feedback. It is not a summative rubric, as might be used in state exams to measure a set of absolute criteria. 10

11 LDC Rubrics – Scoring v. Grading It helps students know…  expectations before the task is completed,  where their strengths and weaknesses are after the task is completed. 11

12 LDC Rubrics – Scoring v. Grading It helps teachers gauge the effectiveness of their instructional choices and delivery. 12

13 LDC Rubrics – Scoring v. Grading This rubric is designed for teaching that looks for progress, NOT failure. No one fails. Students use the feedback to improve - as do teachers. 13

14 Basics on Rubric Seven scoring elements Four performance levels Four correlating score points plus mid-point scores 14

15 Deconstruct the Rubric 15 Focus Controlling Idea Reading/Research Development Organization Conventions Content Understanding

16 Controlling Idea Start with ‘3 – Meets Expectations’ Similarities - Highlight the words that are included in every level of controlling idea. What do you see? Differences - Underline the distinguishing words in every level of controlling idea. What is required for a student to improve their skills in this element? Scoring Element Controlling Idea Attempts to establish a claim, but lacks a clear purpose. Establishes a claim. Establishes a credible claim. Establishes and maintains a substantive and credible claim or proposal. 16

17 Organization Start with ‘3 – Meets Expectations’ Similarities - Highlight the words that are included in every level of controlling idea. What do you see? Differences - Underline the distinguishing words in every level of controlling idea. What is required for a student to improve their skills in this element? Scoring Elements Organization Attempts to organize ideas, but lacks control of structure. Uses an appropriate organizational structure for development of reasoning and logic, with minor lapses in structure and/or coherence. Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Structure reveals the reasoning and logic of the argument. Maintains an organizational structure that intentionally and effectively enhances the presentation of information as required by the specific prompt. Structure enhances development of the reasoning and logic of the argument. 17

18 Focus Look at the ponds with ducks swimming in different patterns. Use the Scoring Element Focus on your rubric to determine ascending order. Write down the correct letter sequence. Lacks focus Focus is uneven Clear, steady focus Consistently strong focus A B C D 18

19 C = Lacks Focus 19

20 A = Focus Is Uneven 20

21 D = Clear, Steady Focus 21

22 B = Consistently Strong Focus 22

23 Understanding Focus C A D B “lacks focus”“focus is uneven” “clear, steady focus” “consistently strong focus” 23

24 Focus How steadily and thoroughly does the student address the prompt? Scoring Element Focus Attempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task. Addresses prompt appropriately and establishes a position, but focus is uneven. D: Addresses additional demands sufficiently. Addresses prompt appropriately and maintains a clear, steady focus. Provides a generally convincing position. D: Addresses additional demands sufficiently. Addresses all aspects of prompt appropriately with a consistently strong focus and convincing position. D: Addresses additional demands with thoroughness and makes a connection claim. 24

25 Is It Possible? Could a student possibly earn a 4 for controlling idea and a 1 for focus? Think of an example. 25

26 Reading and Research 26 Scoring Element Reading/ Research Attempts to reference reading materials to develop response, but lacks connections or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. Presents information from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt with minor lapses in accuracy or completeness. Accurately presents details from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt to develop argument or claim. Accurately and effectively presents important details from reading materials to develop argument or claim. How does the student transfer relevant content from the reading materials to the writing product?

27 Development How thoroughly does the student provide and explain details in support of the controlling idea? 27 Scoring Element Development Attempts to provide details in response to the prompt, but lacks sufficient development or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. Presents appropriate details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim, with minor lapses in the reasoning, examples, or explanations. Presents appropriate and sufficient details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. Presents thorough and detailed information to effectively support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim.

28 Conventions How much command does the student have over standard English conventions, cohesion, and sentence structures? How appropriate are language and tone? Are citations of sources appropriate? 28 Scoring Element Conventions Attempts to demonstrate standard English conventions, but lacks cohesion and control of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Sources are used without citation. Demonstrates an uneven command of standard English conventions and cohesion. Uses language and tone with some inaccurate, inappropriate, or uneven features. Inconsistently cites sources. Demonstrates a command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Cites sources using appropriate format with only minor errors. Demonstrates and maintains a well-developed command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone consistently appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Consistently cites sources using appropriate format.

29 Conventions 29  On your handout, read Paragraphs A, B, C, D.  Assign a Conventions score to Paragraphs A, B, C, and D and provide a brief scoring rationale.  Discuss your scores and rationales with others at the table.

30 Paragraph B Convention Score = 1 Attempts to demonstrate a command, but lacks control in standard English conventions and cohesion Spelling, grammar usage errors interfere with communication 30

31 Paragraph D Conventions Score = 2 Uneven command in standard English conventions and cohesion Sentence structure, grammar and mechanics begin to interfere with understanding Many errors relative to complexity of sentence structures 31

32 Paragraph A Conventions Score = 3 Solid control of sentence structure and standard English conventions Appropriate language and tone Few errors Misspelling (incandescent) Minor lapse in punctuation (apostrophe) 32

33 Paragraph C Conventions Score = 4 Well-developed control of sentences Maintains an effective tone Intentional use of language Consistent control of standard English conventions 33

34 Content Understanding How firmly does the student grasp the relevant content? 34 Scoring Element Content Understanding Attempts to include disciplinary content in argument, but understanding of content is weak; content is irrelevant, inappropriate, or inaccurate. Briefly notes disciplinary content relevant to the prompt; shows basic or uneven understanding of content; minor errors in explanation. Accurately presents disciplinary content relevant to the prompt with sufficient explanations that demonstrate understanding. Integrates relevant and accurate disciplinary content with thorough explanations that demonstrate in- depth understanding.

35 Scoring Principles 1.Know the rubric. 2.Trust evidence, not intuition. 3.Match evidence to language in the rubric. 4.Weigh evidence carefully’ base judgment on the preponderance of evidence. 5.Know your biases; leave them at the door. 6.Focus on what the student does, not on what the student does not do. 7.Isolate your judgment. One bad element does not equal a bad paper. 8.Resist seduction. One good element does not equal a good paper. 9.Recognize direct copy or plagiarism. 10.Stick to the rubric! 35

36 Using the LDC Rubrics for Scoring Paper X 7 Elements at Tables Table Calibration 36 o Focus o Controlling Idea o Reading/Research o Development o Organization o Conventions o Content Understanding

37 Calibrating Scoring: Whole Group 37

38 Grading Total = divided by 28 total points = divided by 7 elements =

39 Reconnecting Conversation 39 Questions to Ask Ourselves: -What instruction is needed? -What might be future mini -tasks? -What skills and instruction need to be considered in future modules? Section 4: What Results

40 Reflecting on the Scoring Process and Scoring Student Work Strengths noted student’s product? Areas of weakness noted in student's product? 40

41 Based on what you are noticing… How can we revise mini-tasks based on rubric results? Supporting students individually as well as whole class instruction. 41

42 Skill and Definition (what the student needs to be able to do) Instructional Strategies (effective strategies to teach the specific skill) Pacing (how long) Prompt (what I will tell students they will do during the day’s instruction) Product (authentic work sample from the day’s instruction) Scoring (criteria defining to what degree students accomplish the day’s skill) 42 Mini - Tasks

43 Scoring Session Use this time to work with in pairs or triads to collaboratively score student work. Take note of a praise points for each product. Suggest a teaching point for each product. 43

44 Work Session 44

45 LDC Updates LDC.org CoreTools 45


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