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January 2015 Teachers Session 2 1 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC.

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Presentation on theme: "January 2015 Teachers Session 2 1 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC."— Presentation transcript:

1 January 2015 Teachers Session 2 1 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC

2 Norms A ppreciate one another E xchange ideas freely I nfluence what we can O ffer opportunities to reflect U nite in a purpose 2 Reach Associates 2014

3 Outcomes Deepen understanding of each section in the LDC Framework and how each section supports implementing the Common Core Standards (CCSS) Understand the 7 elements and scoring used on the LDC Rubrics Calibrate thinking about student work Revise 1 st module or being to write a 2 nd LDC module 3 Reach Associates 2014

4 Practice Experts’ Sharing Share one of the following…  something that yielded an increase in student achievement  a change in instructional practice  a positive result on Teacher Effectiveness Rating 4 # LDoELDC

5 Silent Conversation 5

6 Revisit Section 1: What Task? 6 Reach Associates 2014

7 Introducing Version 3.0 LDC Task Template Collection Version 3.0 Revised in October 2014 Common numbering regardless of grade band Coded “A” if argumentative Coded “IE” if informational/explanatory “After reading” and “After researching” no longer separate tasks Minor wording changes 7 Reach Associates 2014

8 Reconnecting Conversations: Partner Discussions How would you explain an LDC Teaching Task to a colleague? 8 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC

9 Choosing Appropriate Texts newsela.com EBSCO Library - CoreTaskProject Library of Congress – primary source docs - history https://beyondthebubble.stanford.edu/ Read Works - Science 9 Reach Associates 2014

10 Revisiting Section 2: What Skills? 10 Reach Associates 2014

11 Deconstruct the teaching task into skill clusters Preparing for the Task The Reading Process Transition to Writing Process 11 Reach Associates 2014

12 12 Reach Associates 2014 Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task *Task Engagement *Task Analysis *Rubric Analysis Cluster 2: The Reading Process *Text Selection (if using “After researching…..”) *Active Reading - (add Your Targeted ELL Skill) * Active Reading, Note Taking and Essential Vocabulary *Academic Integrity Cluster 3: Transition to Writing *Bridging Conversation Cluster 4: Writing Process *Claim or Thesis Statement *Planning *Developing *Revision *Editing *Completion Sample LDC Skill Cluster Ladder 1-2 Days 3-7 Days 1-2 Days

13 Skill Cluster 2: Reading Process (Grade 8) -Skills are from ELA and content specific grade level standards. -Definition (ability to….) creates instructional clarity. -Specific skills guide teacher in planning instruction.. Each skill cluster is broken into specific skills which helps guides teacher in planning instruction. 13 Reach Associates 2014

14 What Skills Do Students Need? 14 Reach Associates 2014 Consider the following to determine skills to target: Demands of the task itself Expectations of your grade level standards Strengths and needs of the students

15 Grade Specific Definitions How would you rewrite the following generic skill definition into one which pinpoints your grade level expectations? Hint: Look at your grade level version of W8. 15 Reach Associates 2014 POST-READING > ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Ability to use and credit sources appropriately. # LDoELDC

16 Section 3: What Instruction? 16 Reach Associates 2014

17 pacing skill prompt and product scoring guide instructional strategies What Instruction? What Instruction? - Section 3 - The instruction for each skill is called the “mini-task”. - Each mini-task is organized into a formative teaching and learning cycle. 17 Reach Associates 2014

18 Let’s Build a Mini-Task 18 Reach Associates 2014 Targeted Standard(s) Skill and Definition Product and Prompt Scoring Instructional Strategies Pacing

19 19 Reach Associates 2014 Skill and Definition: Annotating – Ability to cite strong and thorough explicit and inferential evidence from authoritative print sources (RI9-10.1, W9-10.8) Product and Prompt Prompt – Read carefully and annotate the text using the annotation key, identifying strong evidence which supports the author’s claim Product – Annotations on the text Scoring Meets expectations if: o At least 1 explicit detail supporting the author’s claim is underlined in each section o At least 1 inferential detail supporting the author’s claim is noted in the margin of each section

20 Instructional Strategies o Annotation Key is introduced. o Teacher reads, thinks aloud and models annotation of first paragraph. o Partners read and discuss second paragraph. o Partners agree on (and draw a box around) one explicit piece of evidence to support the author’s claim. Share out. o Partners agree on one inferential piece of evidence to support the author’s claim. Share out. o Partners continue with next paragraph… Pacing 30 minutes 20 Reach Associates 2014

21 Your Turn… Think about the skill of synthesizing information to bridge to writing. Build a mini-task with a partner for this skill. Be sure to include: 21 Reach Associates 2014 Skill and Definition Product and Prompt Scoring Instructional Strategies Pacing SKILL

22 Let’s Look at a Module 22 Reach Associates 2014 What Task? What Skills? What Instruction? Grade 5 ELA: A Closer Look at Mother to Son - https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/a6c48a89-72c b6-e7bdaecbba98 https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/a6c48a89-72c b6-e7bdaecbba98 Grades 9-10 History: Calculating the Costs – Atomic Bombs in https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/3e4b7308-8ab9-41ed-aca1-7b de6https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/3e4b7308-8ab9-41ed-aca1-7b de6 Grades 9-12 Physics: Building Bridges - https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/d518c79d-407b-4e4b-a0d4-56a96460f866 https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/d518c79d-407b-4e4b-a0d4-56a96460f866 Grades Chemistry: Fire Down Under-Examining the Effects of Various Antacids https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/4298dd b48-a917-f1db4cd53e86 https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/4298dd b48-a917-f1db4cd53e86 Grades ELA: Rhetorical Analysis for Pre-AP English - https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/f092a64e-f128-4e8f-89fb-7fbdb093f9bb https://coretools.ldc.org/#/mods/f092a64e-f128-4e8f-89fb-7fbdb093f9bb

23 Turn and Talk 23 Reach Associates 2014 What did you notice? What will you add to your module? What questions do you have? # LDoELDC

24 Looking at Student Work 24 Reach Associates 2014

25 Independently Grading Paper X  Read Paper X, envisioning that you gave your students this assignment at some point during the school year.  Using your own frame of reference, quickly determine a grade for Paper X. Write the grade in the top right corner. 25 Reach Associates 2014

26 Debrief How did you arrive at your grade? 26 Reach Associates 2014

27 Grading vs Scoring 27 Grading: Reflects the performance of students relative to expectations at a particular point in time. Scoring: Uses fixed standards of quality that do not change over time. Reach Associates 2014

28 LDC Rubrics – Scoring vs Grading The LDC rubric is constructed for classroom use and to provide feedback to students and teachers. It is for feedback. It is not a summative rubric, as might be used in state exams to measure a set of absolute criteria. Reach Associates

29 LDC Rubrics – Scoring vs Grading It helps students know expectations before the task is completed, and where their strengths and weaknesses are after the task is completed. Reach Associates

30 LDC Rubrics – Scoring vs Grading It helps teachers gauge the effectiveness of their instructional choices and delivery. Reach Associates

31 LDC Rubrics – Scoring vs Grading This rubric is designed for teaching that looks for progress NOT failure. No one fails. Students use the feedback to improve - as do teachers. Reach Associates

32 Basics on Rubric Seven scoring elements Four performance levels Four correlating score points plus mid-point scores 32 Reach Associates 2014

33 Deconstruct the Rubric 33 Focus Controlling Idea Reading/Research Development Organization Conventions Content Understanding Reach Associates 2014

34 Controlling Idea - Similarities Start with ‘3 – Meets Expectations’ Highlight the words that are included in every level of controlling idea. What do you see? How does the student establish an overall claim, as well as recognize and address competing claims? Scoring Element Controllin g Idea Attempts to establish a claim, but lacks a clear purpose. (L2) Makes no mention of counter claims. Establishes a claim. (L2) Makes note of counter claims. Establishes a credible claim. (L2) Develops claim and counter claims fairly. Establishes and maintains a substantive and credible claim or proposal. (L2) Develops claims and counter claims fairly and thoroughly. 34 Reach Associates 2014

35 Organization - Similarities Start with ‘3 – Meets Expectations’ Highlight the words that are included in every level of controlling idea. What do you see? How controlled and logical is the essay’s structure? Scoring Elements Organization Attempts to organize ideas, but lacks control of structure. Uses an appropriate organizational structure for development of reasoning and logic, with minor lapses in structure and/or coherence. Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Structure reveals the reasoning and logic of the argument. Maintains an organizational structure that intentionally and effectively enhances the presentation of information as required by the specific prompt. Structure enhances development of the reasoning and logic of the argument. 35 Reach Associates 2014

36 Organization How controlled and logical is the essay’s organizational structure? 36 Scoring Elements Organization Attempts to organize ideas, but lacks control of structure. Uses an appropriate organizational structure for development of reasoning and logic, with minor lapses in structure and/or coherence. Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Structure reveals the reasoning and logic of the argument. Maintains an organizational structure that intentionally and effectively enhances the presentation of information as required by the specific prompt. Structure enhances development of the reasoning and logic of the argument. Reach Associates 2014

37 Focus How steadily and thoroughly does the student address the prompt? Scoring Element Focus Attempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task. Addresses prompt appropriately and establishes a position, but focus is uneven. Addresses prompt appropriately and maintains a clear, steady focus. Provides a generally convincing position. Addresses all aspects of prompt appropriately with a consistently strong focus and convincing position. 37 Reach Associates 2014

38 Focus Look at the ponds with ducks swimming in different patterns. Use the Scoring Element Focus on your rubric to determine ascending order. Write down the correct letter sequence. Lacks focus Focus is uneven Clear, steady focus Consistently strong focus A B C D 38 Reach Associates 2014

39 Understanding Focus C A D B “lacks focus”“focus is uneven” “clear, steady focus” “consistently strong focus” 39 Reach Associates 2014

40 Is It Possible? Could a student possibly earn a 4 for controlling idea and a 1 for focus? Give an example. 40 Reach Associates 2014

41 Reading and Research 41 Scoring Element Reading/ Research Attempts to reference reading materials to develop response, but lacks connections or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. Presents information from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt with minor lapses in accuracy or completeness. Accurately presents details from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt to develop argument or claim. Accurately and effectively presents important details from reading materials to develop argument or claim. How does the student transfer relevant content from the reading materials to the writing product? Reach Associates 2014

42 Development How thoroughly does the student provide and explain details in support of the controlling idea? 42 Scoring Element Development Attempts to provide details in response to the prompt, but lacks sufficient development or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. (L3) Makes no connections or a connection that is irrelevant to argument or claim. Presents appropriate details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim, with minor lapses in the reasoning, examples, or explanations. (L3) Makes a connection with a weak or unclear relationship to argument or claim. Presents appropriate and sufficient details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. (L3) Makes a relevant connection to clarify argument or claim. Presents thorough and detailed information to effectively support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. (L3) Makes a clarifying connection(s) that illuminates argument and adds depth to reasoning. Reach Associates 2014

43 Conventions 43  On your handout, read Paragraphs A, B, C, D.  Assign a Conventions score to Paragraphs A, B, C, and D and provide a brief scoring rationale.  Discuss your scores and rationales with others at the table. Reach Associates 2014

44 Conventions How much command does the student have over standard English conventions, cohesion, and sentence structures? How appropriate are language and tone? Are citations of sources appropriate? 44 Scoring Element Conventions Attempts to demonstrate standard English conventions, but lacks cohesion and control of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Sources are used without citation. Demonstrates an uneven command of standard English conventions and cohesion. Uses language and tone with some inaccurate, inappropriate, or uneven features. Inconsistently cites sources. Demonstrates a command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Cites sources using appropriate format with only minor errors. Demonstrates and maintains a well-developed command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone consistently appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Consistently cites sources using appropriate format. Reach Associates 2014

45 Paragraph B Convention Score = 1 Attempts to demonstrate a command, but lacks control in standard English conventions and cohesion Spelling, grammar usage errors interfere with communication 45 Reach Associates 2014

46 Paragraph D Conventions Score = 2 Uneven command in standard English conventions and cohesion Sentence structure, grammar and mechanics begin to interfere with understanding Many errors relative to complexity of sentence structures 46 Reach Associates 2014

47 Paragraph A Conventions Score = 3 Solid control of sentence structure and standard English conventions Appropriate language and tone Few errors Misspelling (incandescent) Minor lapse in punctuation (apostrophe) 47 Reach Associates 2014

48 Paragraph C Conventions Score = 4 Well-developed control of sentences Maintains an effective tone Intentional use of language Consistent control of standard English conventions 48 Reach Associates 2014

49 Content Understanding How firmly does the student grasp the relevant content? 49 Scoring Element Content Understanding Attempts to include disciplinary content in argument, but understanding of content is weak; content is irrelevant, inappropriate, or inaccurate. Briefly notes disciplinary content relevant to the prompt; shows basic or uneven understanding of content; minor errors in explanation. Accurately presents disciplinary content relevant to the prompt with sufficient explanations that demonstrate understanding. Integrates relevant and accurate disciplinary content with thorough explanations that demonstrate in- depth understanding. Reach Associates 2014

50 What’s Missing? Culminating Rubric Activity 50 Reach Associates 2014

51 Scoring Principles 1.Know the rubric. 2.Trust evidence, not intuition. 3.Match evidence to language in the rubric. 4.Weigh evidence carefully’ base judgment on the preponderance of evidence. 5.Know your biases; leave them at the door. 6.Focus on what the student does, not on what the student does not do. 7.Isolate your judgment. One bad element does not equal a bad paper. 8.Resist seduction. One good element does not equal a good paper. 9.Recognize direct copy or plagiarism. 10.Stick to the rubric! 51 Reach Associates 2014

52 Use the LDC Rubric to Score the Student Sample 52 Reach Associates 2014

53 Table Sharing Share how you scored Paper X using the rubric. Provide evidence. 53 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC

54 LDC Rubric for Argumentation Template Tasks Paper X Official Scores Reach Associates

55 Grading Total = divided by 28 total points = divided by 7 elements = Reach Associates 2014

56 Work Session Reminder: The components of the mini task need to be aligned/purposefully connected. This means the skill and definition you've listed should guide your choice of the daily prompt, product and the instructional strategies used to teach that skill. Mini-Task Check In… Skills Ladder Check In… Reminder: Be sure to refer to your specific grade level Common Core Standards when defining the skills. 56 Reach Associates 2014

57 Collegial Sharing of Best Practices Give One – Get One Quick Write – Instructional Strategy for: Preparing for the Task Developing Vocabulary Active Reading and Note-Taking Bridging Conversation from Reading to Writing Writing, Planning and Development Revision and Editing 57 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC

58 Jurying Modules How are modules deemed ‘exemplar’? 58 Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC

59 LDC Website 59 Reach Associates 2014

60 Work Session Write 2 nd module Revise 1 st module Score student work 60 Reach Associates 2014

61 GIST How does scoring with the LDC Rubric guide instruction and learning? Write the GIST in EXACTLY 25 words! 61 The word gist is defined as "the main or essential part of a matter." Reach Associates 2014 # LDoELDC


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