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Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond.

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Presentation on theme: "Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond."— Presentation transcript:

1 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond

2 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 2 Reaching out to all voters What: $36.5 million referendum When: Tuesday, October 27 Where: Garden City High School Why: All nine district buildings are in need of significant repair, modernization and/or restoration; Homestead, Garden City Middle School and Garden City High School require additional instructional space

3 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 3 What will the bond accomplish? The projects proposed in the bond are based on a comprehensive needs analysis Improvements will enable the district to meet basic safety and code requirements Improvements will help maintain Garden City’s tradition of excellence Improvements will provide access for all students and community members Improved facilities are a resource for the entire community

4 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 4 What are the bond’s educational benefits? Reclaim and repurpose learning space and make optimal use of instructional time Protect Garden City’s tradition of educational excellence by modernizing existing space and expanding facilities at Homestead, the Middle school and the High School Provide appropriate learning environments for students with special needs receiving support services Create opportunities for 21 st century learning Maintain small class sizes, middle school teaming and continuum of services in special education

5 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 5 How were projects identified? In the past four years, the District conducted two comprehensive analyses of its facilities, as well as two demographic studies In the school year, the Board of Education established the ad hoc Committee on Facilities “to review the facilities needs…and make recommendations to the Board regarding the condition of the physical plant and improvements required to address the district’s educational programs and demographic trends.”

6 How were projects identified? After extensive discussion and review, the Facilities Committee recommended a conservative list of projects that addresses only the most pressing needs Several major energy-related projects will be addressed through an Energy Performance Contract (EPC) at no additional cost to the taxpayers Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 6

7 Facilities Committee James Carney Peter Clarke John DeMaro Evelyn Fasano Tina Halvatzis Frank Ruggiero Susan Lee Patrick Mehr Dave Perrotta Jean Ricotta Al Chase, Chair Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 7 Angela Heineman--Board of Education liaison BBS Architects & Engineers—District architect

8 What problems will the bond address? Masonry Windows Grading High School roof Interior and exterior door deterioration Lack of accessibility for people with disabilities Stairways and landings Middle School locker rooms (will be relocated to first floor) Middle School: hallway traffic congestion and parking and pick-up/drop-off for students Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 8 Water damage

9 What problems will the bond address? Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 9 Deficient/outdated spaces for educational programs and community events High School music programs Undersized rooms for support services for students in special programs Middle School north gym Homestead music/art/physical education Warren King Field bleachers

10 What problems will the bond address? Heating and ventilation Equipment well beyond useful service life--Results in increased maintenance, low efficiency and higher utility bills Reduced temperature control and air quality Low reliability—parts may be unavailable Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 10

11 Why do we need a bond? School districts have limited means through which to address major capital projects The scope of the projects is too vast to be addressed through the annual district budget Action is needed to prevent further deterioration and higher costs in the future Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 11

12 Why do we need a bond? A bond reduces the threat of tax spikes required to pay for extensive renovation/repair projects in a single year A bond spreads the cost of long-lasting capital improvements over a number of years, rather than placing the funding burden solely on current taxpayers The district can benefit from the current difficult economic climate because interest rates are low and many contractors are seeking work Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 12

13 Why do we need a bond? It is not unusual for school districts to bond every years—one nearby similar district bonds every 7-8 years Manhasset: $21.5 million; $19 million Seaford: $10.8 million; $21.6 million Bay Shore—1995--$18.2 million; $83.7 million Northport-East Northport: $30.5 million; $3.4 million Plainview-Old Bethpage: 1999—$24.3 million; $2.6 million Rockville Centre: $12.1 million; $2.3 million; $15.2 million Garden City has floated only 2 bonds for improvements to its school buildings in the last 50 years: one in the 60s and one in Long Beach, with a similar bonding history, passed a $95 million bond last spring to address long-delayed needs Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 13

14 What will the bond cost taxpayers? The project total is $36.5 million The district will need to borrow a maximum of $35.2 million  $1.3 million in existing capital funds will be used to fund some of the project total  Anticipated to be additionally offset by $1.35 million in EXCEL aid from New York State Borrowing is expected to occur in 3 phases between 2010 and 2012 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 14

15 What will the bond cost taxpayers? The District’s bond rating is excellent: AA+ At its peak, the School Investment Bond will cost approximately 71¢/day or $261/year for the average homeowner The interest rate is conservatively estimated at 4.5%; actual borrowing costs may be less After 6/30/15, property tax attributable to all debt service begins to decline Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 15

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17 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 17

18 Comparison of Per Pupil Costs Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 18

19 What projects have been completed through the annual district budget capital allocation? Stewart and Stratford dual-fuel boiler conversions Homestead, Hemlock & MS roofs HS auditorium lighting Resurface HS track MS Scan-Tek technology lab Stewart & Stratford playground resurfacing IT disaster recovery project MS south gym bleachers HS locker rooms HS/MS cafeteria renovations Bus garage roof Fuel tank repairs Doors, roof and & masonry repairs--district- wide Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 19 Note: List is not all-inclusive

20 What was done as a result of the 1998 bond? Extensive projects were completed Classroom additions at primary, elementary and middle schools Libraries at Stewart, Stratford, MS & HS Elevators at Stewart & Stratford Electrical upgrades—All buildings Science room renovations—HS Outdoor track, parking lot, tennis courts—HS Auditorium seating—MS and HS Hallway lighting and flooring—Stewart Lunch room--Stratford Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 20

21 What was done as a result of the 1998 bond? The original bond proposed in 1997 totaled $50 million; it did not pass A revised $38 million dollar bond passed in 1998 It was assumed when the 1998 passed that the projects deleted from the original proposal would need to be addressed in future years, as facilities aged and enrollment increased at the secondary level Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 21

22 What was NOT included in the 1998 bond? Replacement of High School roof Air conditioning in libraries & auditoriums Turf fields Computers Additional music space at High School Bleachers Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 22

23 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 23 Repairs needed…

24 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 24

25 Repairs needed … Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 25

26 Next Steps Submission of plans to State Education Department Approval by SED (8-12 weeks) First phase borrowing (spring/summer 2010) Work commences—Summer 2010 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 26

27 Garden City Public Schools 2009 School Investment Bond 27 Questions & Answers Visit the Garden City School District Web site for ongoing information updates


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