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Smoke Alarm Installer Training. Name Organization Please Introduce Yourself.

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Presentation on theme: "Smoke Alarm Installer Training. Name Organization Please Introduce Yourself."— Presentation transcript:

1 Smoke Alarm Installer Training

2 Name Organization Please Introduce Yourself

3  Recognize the need for smoke alarms.  Describe the selection of single-station smoke alarms.  Differentiate between the smoke-sensing technologies of single-station smoke alarms. Course Objectives

4  Determine the minimum number of smoke alarms needed to meet the requirements of NFPA® 72 for residential structures and HUD guidelines for mobile homes..  Describe installation of alert devices for people with disabilities.  Recognize the opportunity to conduct fire and life safety education during smoke alarm installation. Course Objectives

5 Modern furnishings and construction materials make smoke alarms vital to resident safety. [Click to play video.]

6 Smoke alarms alert residents to smoke and awaken sleeping residents. Open floor plans do little to reduce spread Modern furnishings burn faster, release gases Smoke spreads quickly Alarms alert occupants to smoke Wake sleeping residents Fatal fires occur while occupants sleep Ensures appropriate placement Opportunity for fire and life safety education Alarms most effective when installed by trained personnel

7 Ensure alarms are approved by a nationally-recognized testing authority.

8 Single station smoke alarms are suited for residential installation. With many alarms, activation of one does not activate all Require battery, replacement Require maintenance Relatively inexpensive Use same technology as hard-wired alarms Easy to install Do not require licensed electrician to install

9 Ionization alarms are good at detecting fast flaming fires with little visible smoke. Ionization smoke alarms react to ionized molecules in the chamber.

10 Photoelectric alarms are more responsive to smoldering fires and dense smoke. A refractory smoke alarm detects smoke when light reaches a sensor after reflecting off smoke.

11 Combination ionization/photoelectric alarms combine the benefits of both technologies. Alarm can be activated by either of the sensors within the unit.

12 Several smoke alarms are available through the Oklahoma Assistive Technology Foundation program. Kidde PI9000 Ionization/ Photoelectric 9V front loading battery Test button Hush feature 10-year life

13 Several smoke alarms are available through the Oklahoma Assistive Technology Foundation program. Kidde P3010L Alarm Photoelectric Sealed lithium battery Automatic activation once the alarm is installed Test/Hush button for testing

14 Several smoke alarms are available through the Oklahoma Assistive Technology Foundation program. Gentex Series 7139LS Photoelectric Plugs into wall outlet Lithium Battery included. 90 db alarm 177 candela strobe light

15 Review Questions What are the two common smoke sensing technologies used in single-station alarms? Which technology is most prone to false alarms from cooking? Which technology is best at detecting smoldering fires and dense smoke? Which technology is best at detecting fast flaming fires with little smoke? Which technology is most prone to false alarms from dust and insects?

16 Smoke alarm placement influences their effectiveness. Warning device Alert sleeping residents Only a few minutes to escape Install where smoke will travel Smoke rises Path of least resistance Limited device life Replace every ten years Note replacement date on back of alarm

17 NFPA® 72 lists requirements for smoke alarm placement in existing homes. One alarm on every level One alarm in every sleeping room One alarm in each hallway

18 Install alarms in air flow areas near the ceiling where smoke will travel. Image courtesy of

19 Install alarms in air flow areas near the ceiling where smoke will travel.

20

21 Review Questions What are the minimum smoke alarm requirements in existing residential construction? In mobile homes? How far should wall-mounted smoke alarms be placed from the ceiling? Where should smoke alarms be placed on a sloped ceiling, relative to the peak?

22 False alarms are more than an annoyance. Disconnect battery or remove alarm to silence false alarms Assume all alarms are false Annoying noise

23 Avoid these sources of false alarms. More than 12 inches from Fluorescent lights More than 3 feet from Kitchen doorway Bathroom doorway Forced air vents Air conditioner units Ceiling fans Ventilation fans More than 10 feet from Damp, humid, steamy areas Bathrooms with showers More than 20 feet from StoveFurnaceWater heaterSpace heaterWall heater Not in areas below 40°F (4°C) or above 100°F (38°C) Unheated buildings Outdoor rooms, porches Unfinished attics, basements

24 Remember these placement guidelines. Use your best judgmentInstall the number of alarms neededWrite the replacement date on the alarmDo not remove existing alarms

25 Identify the smoke alarms needed for residential structures and mobile homes. Learning Activity

26 Smoke Alarm Placement Example #1 Single story house Laundry Garage Living Dining Kitchen Bedroom Bathroom

27 Smoke Alarm Placement Example #1 Single story house Laundry Garage Living Dining Kitchen Bedroom Bathroom

28 Master Bedroom Garage Living Room Office/ Guest Room Bedroom Bath Storage Dining Room Family Room Bath Laundry Kitchen Smoke Alarm Placement Example # 2 Two story house Upper Floor Lower Floor

29 Master Bedroom Garage Living Room Office/ Guest Room Bedroom Bath Storage Dining Room Family Room Bath Laundry Kitchen Smoke Alarm Placement Example # 2 Two story house Upper Floor Lower Floor

30 Complete the rest of the floor plans on your own. Learning Activity

31 Smoke Alarm Placement #1 Single story house Laundry Bathroom Living Room Bedroom Dining Area Kitchen

32 Smoke Alarm Placement #1 Single story house Laundry Bathroom Living Room Bedroom Dining Area Kitchen

33 Smoke Alarm Placement #2 Two story house Upper Floor Lower Floor

34 Smoke Alarm Placement #2 Two story house Upper Floor Lower Floor

35 Smoke Alarm Placement #3 Single story house Garage Living Room Laundry Bath Dining Kitchen Bedroom

36 Smoke Alarm Placement #3 Single story house Garage Living Room Laundry Bath Dining Kitchen Bedroom

37 Smoke Alarm Placement #4 Mobile home

38 Smoke Alarm Placement #4 Mobile home

39 Alert equipment supplements smoke alarms for people with disabilities. Lifetone alert device Listening device – not a smoke alarm “Hears” audio signal from smoke alarm Alerts by 520 Hz audio signal Displays “FIRE” Shakes bed

40 Alert equipment supplements smoke alarms for people with disabilities. Lifetone alert device Place at bedside, within six feet of bed Face screen, speaker toward bed Place bed shaker under mattress or pillow Power the unit Insert batteries Plug into wall outlet Test the unit Press TEST button Test smoke detector Set the Clock

41 Fire and life safety education focuses on four key messages. Fall prevention Poisoning prevention Home safety survey Family escape plan

42 Alarm installation provides an opportunity for education. Leading cause of poisoning - Prescription drugs Keep paths clear Keep walkways well-lighted Fall prevention Poisoning prevention

43 Alarm installation provides an opportunity for education. Outside House numbers Fire hazards Cooking Safe zone Attend to cooking Heating Portable heaters Gas-fueled heaters Fireplaces Electrical Extension, power cords Electrical outlets Home Safety Survey Cont.

44 Alarm installation provides an opportunity for education. Candles Safe placement Alternatives Smoking Smoke outside NEVER in bed NEVER near oxygen Hazardous Materials Flammable liquids Propane Inside Lighting Escape Other hazards Home Safety Survey

45 Alarm installation provides an opportunity for education. Meeting place Assistance Practice Escape map Family Escape Plan

46  Smoke alarms alert residents to smoke, allow time for residents to escape  Alarms are most effective when installed by trained personnel Summary

47  Single station smoke alarms are appropriate for existing residences because they are:  Relatively inexpensive  Easy to install – no electrician required  Smoke alarms do require maintenance and testing  Smoke alarms should be replaced after ten years Summary

48  Ionization smoke alarms react more quickly to fast flaming fires with little visible smoke.  Photoelectric smoke alarms are more responsive to smoldering fires and dense smoke.  Combination Ionization/Photoelectric smoke alarms give the benefit of both technologies. Summary

49  Residents have only a few minutes to escape –smoke alarms must be installed properly to alert at earliest opportunity.  Smoke alarms should be installed where smoke is most likely to go. Summary

50  NFPA® 72 established minimum smoke alarm requirements for existing residences.  One alarm on every level  One alarm in every sleeping area  One alarm in each hallway  Smoke alarms should be placed on ceilings or high on walls, out of dead air zones. Summary

51  Proper placement of smoke alarms can reduce the number of false alarms  No home will perfectly match the guidelines – Installers should use their judgment when placing smoke alarms. Summary

52  Alert devices for people with disabilities supplement smoke alarms  Home visits to install smoke alarms present a good opportunity to provide fire and life safety education Summary

53  Fire and life safety visits should include four key messages  Fall Prevention  Poisoning prevention  Home safety survey  Family escape plan Summary

54 Smoke Alarm Installation


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