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LEED v4 Integrative Project Planning and Design Daniel A. Katzenberger, P.E., CEM, BEMP LEED-AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Homes Certified LEED Reviewer Certified.

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Presentation on theme: "LEED v4 Integrative Project Planning and Design Daniel A. Katzenberger, P.E., CEM, BEMP LEED-AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Homes Certified LEED Reviewer Certified."— Presentation transcript:

1 LEED v4 Integrative Project Planning and Design Daniel A. Katzenberger, P.E., CEM, BEMP LEED-AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Homes Certified LEED Reviewer Certified Green Globes Assessor Green Building Assessment Institute dan@gbai.org

2 Integrative Project Planning and Design Learning Objectives: To understand the technical prerequisite and credit requirements of Integrative Project Planning and Design as implemented in LEED v4 To understand the interaction of building, energy, and water systems and how to prioritize each of these as part of the integrative design process To understand the challenges and opportunities associated with implementing an integrative design process

3 Integrative Project Planning and Design Agenda: v4 Prerequisite Integrative Project Planning and Design v4 Credit Integrative Process Integrative Design in Green Globes and in the Living Building Challenge Examples/Discussion/Q&A Guided and open dialog about challenges and opportunities related to implementing successful integrative project plans

4 New prerequisite and credit for LEED v4 based on v3 Pilot Credit Prerequisite applies to LEED Healthcare projects only Credit applies optionally to all LEED-NC project types

5 Prepare an Owner’s Project Requirements Document (see Fundamental Commissioning and Verification Prerequisite for OPR requirements): Include a health mission statement that addresses the triple bottom line values: economic, environmental, and social Determine Preliminary LEED Rating Goals Prior to Schematic Design (recommended), conduct a preliminary LEED meeting with at least four key project team members and the owner’s representative to: Determine the LEED certification level to pursue Select LEED credits to achieve this certification level Identify the responsible parties for each attempted LEED credit Healthcare Prerequisite

6 Design Charrette Prior to schematic design (recommended), conduct a minimum four-hour integrated design charrette with at least four key project team members and the owner’s representative with the goal of optimizing the integration of green strategies across all aspects of the building design, construction, and operations. Selected Step-by-Step Guidance (prior to the Charrette) Review the Integrative Process ANSI Consensus National Standard Guide 2.0 for the Design and Construction of Sustainable Buildings and Communities (must purchase separately) Collect information about the project’s climate, site conditions, waste treatment infrastructure, energy load distribution, water sources, transportation options, and potential building features. Healthcare Prerequisite

7 Selected Step-by-Step Guidance (Charrette Goals) Introduce attendees to the fundamentals of the integrative process Share information collected prior to the charrette with all attendees Elicit the owner’s and other stakeholders’ values, aspirations, and requirements Clarify functional and programmatic goals Establish initial performance targets Identify desired LEED certification level and credits to be targeted Generate potential strategies for achieving performance targets Determine questions that must be answered to support project decisions Initiate development of the project’s health mission statement (remember triple bottom line issues: economic, environmental, and social Create and action plan to include the above Include the project goals, performance targets, LEED targets, and the health mission statement in the owner’s project requirements document. Healthcare Prerequisite

8 Discovery: Use the following analysis to inform the Owner’s Project Requirements, Basis of Design, and construction documents: Energy Related Systems Before the completion of schematic design, perform a “simple box energy analysis” to explore how to reduce energy loads in at least two of the following areas: Site Massing/Orientation Envelope Lighting Thermal Comfort Plug and Process Loads Programmatic and Operational Parameters Integrative Design Credit NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Distribution Warehouse, Hospitality, & Hospitals

9 Implementation Energy Related Systems Document how the “simple box” analysis described above influenced the project’s OPR and/or BOD. Integrative Design Credit NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Distribution Warehouse, Hospitality, & Hospitals

10 Integrative Design Credit NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Distribution Warehouse, Hospitality, & Hospitals

11 Discovery: Use the following analysis to inform the Owner’s Project Requirements, Basis of Design, and construction documents: Water Related Systems Before the completion of schematic design, perform a preliminary water budget analysis to include: Indoor Water Demand Outdoor Water Demand Process Water Demand Water Supply Sources Integrative Design Credit NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Distribution Warehouse, Hospitality, & Hospitals

12 Implementation Water Related Systems Document how the water analysis described above influenced the project’s OPR and/or BOD. Demonstrate how at least one on-site non-potable water supply source was used to reduce the burden on municipal supply or wastewater treatments systems by contributing to at least two of the water demand components listed above. Demonstrate how the water analysis informed the design of the plumbing systems, sewage conveyance or on-site sewage treatment, rainwater quantity and quality, landscaping, irrigation, and site water elements, and roofing systems. Integrative Design Credit NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Distribution Warehouse, Hospitality, & Hospitals

13 Step-by-Step Guidance Become Familiar with the Integrative Process Conduct Preliminary Energy Research and Analysis Conduct Preliminary Water Research and Analysis Convene Goal-Setting Workshop Evaluate Possible Energy Strategies Evaluate Possible Water Strategies Document how the Analysis Informed the Design Integrative Design Credit NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Data Centers, Distribution Warehouse, Hospitality, & Hospitals

14 V4 Technical Questions and Answers Integrative Design Prerequisite and Credit

15 Credit Requirements (individual points for each requirement) Employ an integrated design process to include a minimum of five of the key design disciplines Establish qualitative green design goals at pre-design for the site, envelope, materials efficiency, and indoor environment Establish performance goals for energy efficiency, renewable energy, greenhouse gas emissions, water conservation, life cycle impacts, and construction waste Hold progress meetings at concept design, design development, and construction documents Hold progress meetings at pre-construction, 25% construction, 50% construction, and substantial completion Capital Asset Plan and Business Case Summary for Federal projects Integrative Design Process Green Globes

16 Credit Requirements (N/A) The Living Building Challenge does not dwell on basic best practice issues so it can instead focus on fewer, high level needs. It is assumed that to achieve this progressive standard, typical best practices are being met. The implementation of this standard requires leading-edge technical knowledge, an integrated design approach, and design and construction teams well versed in advanced practices related to ‘green building’ https://ilbi.org/lbc/LBC%20Documents/lbc-2.1 Integrative Design Process Living Building Challenge

17 Integrative Design as Systems Integration We must understand all significant relationships between systems Buildings are not a set of unrelated components In order to optimize a holistic system, we need to implement a holistic approach Using a holistic approach, we can optimize, downsize, and possibly even eliminate entire systems We must think outside the boundaries of the building itself; what systems influence the building and what systems will the building influence Examples/Discussion/Q&A

18 Beware of traditional design “silos” The LEED v4 credit consists of an “energy” component and a “water” component; however, energy and water interact in many ways. For example: HVAC Cooling Tower vs. Open Loop GSHP vs. Air-Cooled Systems Domestic Hot Water Heating vs. Plumbing Fixture Selection HVAC Energy Recovery for Domestic Hot Water Heating Additionally, creative solutions might require input from more than the HVAC and Plumbing Designers. For example: Rooftop solar hot water heating Rain capture for cooling tower make-up We must think holistically about energy, water, and all related building systems if we are to successfully optimize all aspects of the building’s design Examples/Discussion/Q&A

19 Integrative design requires more people and more effort than is traditionally allocated at the pre-design phases of the project. For example: What team members are required to determine the optimum fenestration layout, and when should this be done? How, when, and by whom is the building fenestration layout typically decided? Why should the Lighting Designer be involved in this discussion? Why should the Interior Designer be involved in this discussion? What does the Architect risk by asking for input from the HVAC Designer prior to determining the fenestration layout? What is more important, window U-value, window shading coefficient, or window layout when determining overall building energy use? Should the owner be involved in larger project team discussions about fenestration layouts and window selections? Why or why not? Who is responsible for designing and controlling natural daylight? Examples/Discussion/Q&A

20 Discussion Item, for a typical design process, it has been said: When just 1 percent of a project's up front costs are spent … up to 70 percent of its life cycle costs may already be committed. —Joseph Romm Reed, Bill (2011-10-11). The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) (Kindle Locations 5443-5445). Wiley Publishing. Kindle Edition. According to the AIA's presentation on the Integrated Project Delivery Process, the Orcutt-Wislow Partnership reported the following: “We have found that when we've completed the design development phase, we're already close to 60% finished with construction documentation. Reed, Bill (2011-10-11). The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) (Kindle Locations 2853-2855). Wiley Publishing. Kindle Edition. Examples/Discussion/Q&A

21 Discussion Items: The stages before schematic design (discovery) in the integrative process take nearly twice the time of the same stages in the traditional process (conceptual design) but time required in the integrative process for design development (DD) is reduced, and time in the construction documents (CD) phase can be cut by over a third or more. Reed, Bill (2011-10-11). The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) (Kindle Locations 2858-2861). Wiley Publishing. Kindle Edition. Incorporating input from all key stakeholders and members of the design team before schematic design begins is essential, particularly because 70 percent of the decisions associated with environmental impacts are made during the first 10 percent of the design process. Reed, Bill (2011-10-11). The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) (Kindle Locations 3212-3214). Wiley Publishing. Kindle Edition. Examples/Discussion/Q&A

22 Hypothetically, which of the following is the most important factor to consider when designing a new building? Operational Energy Water Use Embodied Energy Indoor Environmental Quality Transportation Does everyone on the design team, including the owner, agree? Which of the above categories qualifies for the most LEED points? Does ranking by the number of LEED points affect which is most important? Where do design and construction costs come into play in comparing these factors? Examples/Discussion/Q&A

23 What are some of the challenges with implementing this “new” integrative design process? The findings of many studies suggest that the conscious self “plays a causal role only 5% of the time.” There is an active effort on behalf of the mind to make what is conscious unconscious (or subconscious) as quickly as possible. While conscious choice and guidance are needed to perform new tasks, after some repetition, conscious choice quickly drops out and unconscious habit takes over, freeing up precious reserves of conscious awareness. Bargh, J. A. and Chartrand, T.L. (1999) The unbearable automaticity of being. American Psycologist, 54 (7) 462-479 In other words, we are creatures of our subconscious habits, and it takes great effort to modify our habits. We are in the habit of designing buildings a certain way, and changing these habits takes effort; we must address perceived risks. Examples/Discussion/Q&A

24 The most important work that someone trying to introduce a new design process paradigm does is remove risk and uncertainty in order to unleash the latent capacity others have to make change happen. The most common type of risk/uncertainty preventing engagement in implementing integrative design processes are social in nature (status, fairness, alliances, relationships, autonomy, etc.) Often, perceived social risks/uncertainties exist semi-consciously or unconsciously in the form of old stories, feelings, and even physical sensations. Where social risks are concerned, we need to support people to experience their way into new ways of thinking/feeling, rather than hoping that they will think their way into new ways of feeling/thinking about the real nature of their social risk/opportunity. Leith Sharp, Harvard ENVR E-117 – Catalyzing Change – Sustainability Leadership for the 20st Century Examples/Discussion/Q&A

25 Working With the Change Cycle Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations, 1995 overlaid with APT Framework by Leith Sharp & Julie Newman % changed 25 50 75 0 100 Awakening Transforming Pioneering Condition Threshold Reached Condition Threshold Reached

26 Conceptual and stylised representation of waves of innovation Source: TNEP (2005) MARKET INNOVATION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY

27 Earth Systems Infrastructure SystemsOrganizational Systems Social Systems /Dynamics Individual Systems Ecosystems and Species Extinction &toxicity Climate systems Disturbance Atmospheric systems Ozone depletion, pollution Oceanic systems Disturbance to sea levels, temperatures, currents, sea life Geological and Soil systems Desertification, land pollution, mineral & resource depletion, depletion of soil quality, toxicity Hydrological systems Water pollution & scarcity Nutrient systems Disturbance of nutrient flows, toxicity Buildings Transportation Energy Materials Food Supply Water Sewerage Landscaping IT INTERNAL: Governance Management Structures Planning Processes Decision Making Processes Finance & Accounting Policy Instruments Information Systems Procurement systems Human Resources EXTERNAL: Community Government/ Regulatory Market/Employers Utilities Higher Ed. Associations Media Group Processes & Dynamics Culture Relationships/ Alliances Social Connections Trust Emotional Sensitivity Inclusiveness Fairness Relatedness Autonomy Creativity Status Personality Life Circumstances Personal & Interpersonal Capabilities Values/Attitudes Habits/Behaviors Education Skills/Abilities Change Leadership: Reduce Risk/Instability and facilitate stable change in the four key layers of organizational life - Infrastructure, Organizational, Social & Individual Leith Sharp

28 Our project teams and organizations need to be guided through their first integrative design projects in order to become comfortable with this new design process paradigm Integrative design is a change management challenge; managing this challenge requires someone with the ability to guide project teams through their first successful integrative design projects Reducing risk and instability is the foundation of the successful implementation of true Integrative Design projects Stable change requires successful projects (perceived risks are reduced with each successful project) Social dynamics are pivotal in unlocking the change capability of project team and organizations Leith Sharp, Harvard ENVR E-117 – Catalyzing Change – Sustainability Leadership for the 20st Century Examples/Discussion/Q&A

29 Daniel A. Katzenberger dan@gbai.org


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