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©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial Education1 Cosmetology Cells, Anatomy and Physiology: The Muscular System.

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Presentation on theme: "©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial Education1 Cosmetology Cells, Anatomy and Physiology: The Muscular System."— Presentation transcript:

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2 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial Education1 Cosmetology Cells, Anatomy and Physiology: The Muscular System

3 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System2 Performance Objective Upon completion of this assignment, the student will be able to identify muscles of primary concern to the cosmetologist to the satisfaction of the instructor.

4 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System3 Specific Objectives 1. Define terms associated with the muscular system. 2. Identify parts of the muscle. 3. Explain stimulation of muscular tissue. 4. Define mastication. 5. Identify the muscles of the scalp, ear, nose, mouth, neck, upper body, shoulder, chest, arm and hand.

5 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System4 The Muscular System Muscular System: supports the skeleton, produces body movements, contours the body, and is involved in the functions of the digestive, circulatory and nervous systems.

6 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System5 The Muscular System Myology: the study of muscles. We have more than 500 large and small muscles in our body. 40% of our body weight is muscle. When people work out, they may not always lose weight because they may build muscle tissue. Muscles are fibrous tissues that contract and move when given messages by the nervous system.

7 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System6 Types of Muscles Striated: voluntary muscles that respond to commands regulated by will. Striated means striped, grooved or ridged. Non-striated: involuntary muscles that respond automatically to control various body functions, which also includes internal organs. Cosmetologists are concerned with the voluntary muscles of the head, face, neck, arm, and hands. Cardiac (heart): is an involuntary muscle of the heart and is the only muscle of this type throughout the body.

8 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System7 Parts of the muscle Origin: is a fixed, nonmoving part to the muscle. Belly: the middle of a muscle. Insertion: joined to moveable attachments of the bones, moveable muscles, and skin.

9 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System8 How muscles are stimulated Massage: given by hand or vibrators. Electric Current: high-frequency and faradic current. Light Rays: infrared rays and ultraviolet rays. Heat Rays: heating lamps and caps. Moist Heat: steamers, warm steam towels. Nerve Impulses: through the nervous system. Chemicals: certain acids and salts.

10 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System9 Scalp Muscles Epicranius or occipito-frontalis: broad muscle covering the scalp. Frontalis: front part of skull, responsible for raising the eyebrow or wrinkling the forehead. Occipitalis: located at the back of the skull. Aponeurosis: a tendon that joins the occipitalis and the frontalis.

11 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System10 Ear Muscles These muscles do not move and have no functions. Auricularis Anterior: located in front of the ear. Auricularis Superior: located above the ear. Auricularis Posterior: located behind the ear.

12 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System11 Eye and Nose Muscles Corrugator: located between the eyebrow: controls eyebrows and draws them up and down. Levator Palpebra Superioris: located above the eyelids; raises the eyelid. Orbicularis Oculi: surrounds the eyesocket; closes the eyelid. Procerus: located between the eyebrows across the bridge of the nose; draws brows down and wrinkles the area across the bridge of the nose.

13 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System12 Nose Muscles Nasalis, Posterior Dilatator Naris, Anterior Dilatator Naris, and Depressor Septi: located inside the nose; control contraction and expansion of the nostrils.

14 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System13 Mouth Muscles Oris Orbicularis: circles the mouth; responsible for contracting, puckering, and wrinkling the lips as in kissing or whistling. Quadratus Labii Superioris: located above the upper lip; raises both the nostrils and the upper lip as in distaste. Quadratus Labii Inferioris: located below the lower lip; pulls the lower lip down or to the side, as in expressing sarcasm. Mentalis: located at the tip of the chin; pushes the lower lip up and wrinkles the chin, as in expressing doubt.

15 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System14 Mouth Muscles Risorius: located at the corner of the mouth; draws the mouth up and out, as in grinning. Caninus: located above the corners of the mouth; raises the angle of the mouth, as in snarling. Triangularis: located below the corners of the mouth; draws the mouth down, as in expressing depression. Zygomaticus: located outside the corners of the mouth; draws the mouth up and back, as in laughing Buccinator: located between the jaws and cheek; is responsible for compressing the cheek to release air outwardly, as in blowing.

16 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System15 Mastication Muscles Definition: Mastication; chewing. Temporalis: located above and in front of the ear; responsible for both opening and closing the jaw, as in chewing. Masseter: covers the hinge of the jaw; and helps in closing the jaw, as in chewing.

17 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System16 Neck and Upper Body Muscles Platysma: extends from the tip of the chin to the shoulders and chest and depresses the lower jaw and lip, as in expressing sadness. Sternocleido Mastoideus: located along the side of the neck from the ear to the collarbone; causes the head to move up and down, as in nodding. Trapezius and Latissimus Dorsi: covers to back of the neck and upper back; responsible for drawing the head back, rotating the shoulders, and controlling the swing of the arm.

18 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System17 Shoulder, Chest, and Arm Muscles Pectoralis: located across the front of the chest; assist in swinging the arms. Serratus Anterior: located under the arm; assists in lifting the arm and breathing. Deltoid: triangular shaped muscle that covers the shoulders; lifts the arm or turns it. Bicep: muscle in front of the arm; responsible for raising the forearm, bending the elbow, and turning the palm of the hand down. Tricep: extends the length of the upper arm to the forearm; controls forward movement of the forearm.

19 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System18 Shoulder, Chest, and Arm Muscles Supinator: runs parallel to the ulna; turns the palm of the hand up and down. Flexor: located mid-forearm on the side of the arm; bends the wrist and closes the fingers. Extensor: located mid-forearm on the outside of the arm; the muscle straightens the wrist and fingers.

20 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System19 Shoulder, Chest, and Arm Muscles Supinator: runs parallel to the ulna; turns the palm of the hand up and down. Flexor: located mid-forearm on the side of the arm; bends the wrist and closes the fingers. Extensor: located mid-forearm on the outside of the arm; the muscle straightens the wrist and fingers.

21 ©2003 Texas Trade and Industrial EducationCosmetology I: The Muscular System20 Hand Muscles Abductor: located at the base of each digit; separates the finger. Adductor: located at the base of each digit; draws fingers together. Opponens: located in the palm of the hand; cause the thumb to move toward the finger, as in grasping and object or making a fist.


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