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NewsBank, inc. Presents How to Search America’s Newspapers This presentation automatically runs as a slide show.

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Presentation on theme: "NewsBank, inc. Presents How to Search America’s Newspapers This presentation automatically runs as a slide show."— Presentation transcript:

1 NewsBank, inc. Presents How to Search America’s Newspapers This presentation automatically runs as a slide show.

2 You can search a specific newspaper.

3 You can search by state.

4 You can search by region.

5 Or you can search hundreds of titles from the entire States… This tutorial details several effective search techniques that are frequently used in America’s Newspapers. It also offers tips to help you find what you are looking for.

6 You will learn how to:  Search a specific newspaper or sources across a state, region or the U.S. Search a specific newspaper or sources across a state, region or the U.S.  Research a topic or issue Research a topic or issue  Research a person, place or organization Research a person, place or organization  Locate an article you remember reading Locate an article you remember reading  Browse a specific newspaper by date Browse a specific newspaper by date  Locate a book review Locate a book review  View a Special Report View a Special Report  Click on a specific topic to go to it directly, or simply click outside the topics to continue the slideshow.

7 Search a specific newspaper or sources across a state, region or the U.S. For perspectives on topics, people, issues and events, use the map to expand or narrow your search. For example, narrow your search from the entire U.S.… To the Mountain Region… To the state of Arizona… To a single newspaper, The Arizona Republic.

8 1.Search newspapers across the country, or point-and-click on the legend or the map to search sources from a geographic region or a single state. Tip: For the greatest possible number of search results, search the entire U.S.

9 2. For instance, search all sources in the Mountain Region… 3. Or, narrow your search to a single state or a specific newspaper.

10 4.At any time, you can expand your search back to all sources in the U.S.

11 5.Also, you can select specific content modules, such as those for newswires or transcripts (if your library subscribes to them).

12 Research a topic or issue For example, you can research: Terrorism Virus and vaccination Social security AIDS Cloning Military recruiting Global warming Diversity on campus Immigration Ethnicity Local businesses The Nobel Prize

13 In this example, search the entire U.S. 1.Type your search term(s) to describe an issue, event, etc. In this example, use “terrorism.” 2. Choose the timeframe from the drop-down menu. For example, “the past twelve months.”

14 In a second example, compare recent events with past events. 1.Continue to search on “terrorism.” 2.However, choose a different timeframe. For example, choose oldest matches first and specify the year “1992.”

15 1.To begin research on a broad topic, you could search all of the U.S. For instance, search for articles about ethnicity and assimilation. 2.Type in your search: in this case, “ethnic* and assimilat*.” Tip: Use truncation (with an asterisk) to retrieve both “ethnic” and “ethnicity,” as well as all forms of the word “assimilate.”

16 3.You can view your results by page and scan headlines to find articles of interest.

17 For more narrow results, try the same search in a specific region of the country. For example, search New England and choose “Oldest matches first” for a different perspective.

18 1.Narrow your search to specific sources by clicking on their respective boxes in the margin. Tip: To get another type of result, try searching a content module such as Access Newswires, Transcripts (if your library subscribes to them).

19 2.In this example, search transcripts from NPR.

20 Research a person, place or organization For example, you can research: Nobel Prize winners Iraq Amnesty International Donald Rumsfeld ROTC The Middle East FEMA College presidents

21 1. To perform a basic search, type in your search terms. For example, try “Nobel Prize” (in quotation marks) and winner. Tip: To find names, compound terms or exact phrases, use quotation marks. 2. Choose a timeframe. For example, “the past twelve months.”

22 1.If there are too many hits, narrow your search to a specific region. 2. Add one or more related terms and run the search again. For example, try “Nobel Prize” winner literature. 3. Click on “Advanced Search” for even more options. Tip: A search with three or more terms automatically implies a Boolean “AND” between each word.

23 1.You can narrow the criteria with options from the drop-down box. For instance, match “Nobel” with “Headline” and “winner and literature” with “Lead/First Paragraph.” 2. As in the Basic Search, you can change the timeframe. For example, choose “the past six months.”

24 Tip: You can browse a single issue of a selected newspaper. Find a specific issue by entering a specific date. Again, you can select a single newspaper and search for or browse content on a chosen topic.

25 Locate an article you remember reading For example, search for an article… With the phrases “human rights” and “Amnesty International” From the past three months In a specific newspaper or a title from a certain region Note: The sources available to you will depend on your NewsBank subscription

26 1.Use the map or lists of newspapers by region or state to find the title that published the article. 2.Based on what you remember about the article, choose appropriate search terms. 3.Choose a timeframe. For example, search for “human rights” and “Amnesty International” and select “the past three months.”

27 For example, select an article in the Detroit Free Press from Detroit, MI. Tip: Notice the highlighted search terms within the text of the article. Tip: Through the easily customizable interface, your college can highlight regional or in-state newspapers on the tool bar for direct access.

28 1.You can find the same article by searching a specific newspaper. For instance, directly select Detroit Free Press from the list. Tip: Instead of searching, if you remember the date on which the article was published you can simply browse that day’s issue and its articles.

29 Browse a specific newspaper by date For example: You remember hearing about a couple of local articles discussing Air Force budget cuts and how they might affect ROTC cadets. You know the articles appeared in the San Angelo Standard-Times. You think the articles may have been published in late October, Note: The sources available to you will depend on your NewsBank subscription.

30 1.Select a single newspaper. In this example, the San Angelo Standard- Times.

31 Tip: Browse features are available only if a single newspaper is selected. 2. Type the date you wish to browse. In this example, select October 27, Click “Browse.” Tip: The interface shows the five most recent dates available. If the date you want appears, you can simply click on it from the list.

32 4. Browse articles by clicking on their headlines or by selecting “Search Within this Issue.” Tip: Section labels match those in the newspaper’s hardcopy edition.

33 5. Browse the article. Note the headline, paper title, date, author and number of print pages. 6. Click on “Quick Links” to find other articles by the same author or from the same section or date.

34 Tip: At the bottom of each article is more information on the page, section and copyright. Tip: OpenURL links at the end of each article enable you to link an to article in an , which can be sent to a friend, colleague, student or professor. Also, each article has a MARC Record Number, so it is uniquely identified.

35 Locate a book review For example, find a variety of reviews featuring Kurt Vonnegut’s latest book, A Man Without a Country.

36 1.Search a single title for reviews of works by Kurt Vonnegut. In this instance, The New York Times Book Review. 2. Click on “Advanced Search” for more options.

37 1.Type “Kurt Vonnegut” in the first search box and “A Man Without a Country” (in quotation marks) in the second search box. Tip: Do not specify “in Author,” because that will restrict the search to the authors of newspaper articles. Rather, type the name or some words from the title into the search box. 2.Choose a timeframe of 2005 to limit the results to recent reviews.

38 Additionally, you might wish to expand your search to the entire U.S. to get a sampling of reviews around the nation. 1.Click on the “Edit Search” button at the top of your results list.

39 2. Click on “United States” in the “EXPAND TO:” bar.

40 3.Click “Search” to find results from sources across the U.S.

41 4.View results from coast to coast!

42 View a Special Report You can also use Special Reports to get immediate results on a variety of important topics. Choose from many different Special Reports in the left margin, including: World Terrorism Our Planet Earth Black History Poetry Around the World

43 1.Click on “Special Reports” in the left margin to browse information on topics of special interest.

44 2.Then, click on the Special Report(s) of interest to you. Note the variety of topics and information available.

45 America’s Newspapers Is the Ultimate Newspaper Archive We hope this tutorial has helped you understand some of the techniques and strategies for successful research. Remember to: Select appropriate sources to search Define your search terms Specify a timeframe when relevant


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