Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to organise and present whole texts effectively, sequencing and structuring information, ideas and.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to organise and present whole texts effectively, sequencing and structuring information, ideas and."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to organise and present whole texts effectively, sequencing and structuring information, ideas and events. Like Comment 2 minutes ago Think of four synonyms (words that mean the same thing) for the word on the left. If you have the four words I have you think like a genius....er.... ME of course! My Words: Beautiful Attractive Charming Exquisite

3 ‘Before last lesson, I knew… During last lesson, I learnt… Since last lesson, I found out… By the end of this lesson I want to know…’

4 The Twits is/are nasty. Mr Twit is/are hairy and Mrs Twit is/are ugly. They is/are the most horrible people you will ever read about. Mr Twit and Mrs Twit is/are always thinking of nasty tricks to play on each other. When Mrs Twit was/were angry, she gave Mr Twit worms to eat. He didn’t know that there was/were worms in his dinner. He thought that he was/were eating spaghetti. He wondered why his dinner was/were moving!

5 Formal letter – Many people think that we should take holidays in Britain rather than travel abroad. Write a letter to a newspaper giving your views on this issue.

6

7 English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to organise and present whole texts effectively, sequencing and structuring information, ideas and events. Like Comment 55 minutes ago Great student Today I Like Comment Mrs Hallam like this

8 English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to select appropriate vocabulary and spell with a higher level of accuracy. Like Comment 2 minutes ago Think of four synonyms (words that mean the same thing) for the word on the left. If you have the four words I have you think like a genius....er.... ME of course! My Words: Contest Event Competition Battle

9 ‘Before last lesson, I knew… During last lesson, I learnt… Since last lesson, I found out… By the end of this lesson I want to know…’

10 Break it into sounds (u-n-i-o-n) Break it into syllables (con-tin-ent) Break it into affixes (dis + satisfy) Use a mnemonic (Never Eat Chips Eat Salad Sandwiches And Remain Young!) Refer to a word in the same family (chemical, chemist, chemistry) Over-articulate it (Wed-nes-day)

11 WordSynonym 1Synonym 2Synonym 3Synonym 4 amazing cold unhappy tired great positive success fail Find four synonyms (words with similar meanings) for the following words:

12 Informal letter – ‘You have a friend who has decided to run in the London Marathon. Write a letter to your friend giving your opinion.’.

13

14 English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to select appropriate vocabulary and spell with a higher level of accuracy. Like Comment 55 minutes ago Great student Today I Like Comment Mrs Hallam like this

15 English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to write with technical accuracy of syntax and punctuation in phrases, clauses and sentences. Like Comment 2 minutes ago Think of four synonyms (words that mean the same thing) for the word on the left. If you have the four words I have you think like a genius....er.... ME of course! My Words: Journey Tour Voyage Trek

16 ‘Before last lesson, I knew… During last lesson, I learnt… Since last lesson, I found out… By the end of this lesson I want to know…’

17 The comma (Part 1) The comma (,) is used to separate the main clause of a sentence from the subordinate clauses. The main clause is the section of the sentence which makes complete sense by itself. The subordinate clauses do not make sense by themselves. They need a main clause to add to their meaning. For example, look at the sentence While the children were working quietly, Miss Jeffery was surfing the Internet. Miss Jeffery was surfing the Internet is the main clause. It makes complete sense by itself. While the children were working quietly is the subordinate clause. It does not make sense by itself. The main clause and the subordinate clause are separated by a comma. While the children were working quietly, Miss Jeffery was surfing the Internet.

18 The comma (Part 2) The comma (,) is also used to separate items in a list. The rules are as follows: In a list of objects, there is no need for a comma before the final object, because ‘and’ takes its place. For example: For lunch today I had: a cheese sandwich, a packet of crisps, a Fruit Shoot and an apple. There is no need to do this: For lunch today I had: a cheese sandwich, a packet of crisps, a Fruit Shoot, and an apple. The comma before ‘and’ is unnecessary.

19 The comma (Part 3) Rule Number 2: In a list of adjectives or adverbs, there is no need for a comma between the final adjective or adverb and the word it describes. NB: an adjective describes a noun (person, place or thing). For example: The beautiful girl. An adverb describes a verb (a doing word). For example: The car moved quickly. Using the comma in a list of adjectives: The old tramp was a smelly, dirty, unpleasant-looking man. Using the comma in a list of adverbs: The motorbike sped powerfully, dangerously, exhilaratingly along the road.

20 The colon (Part 1) The colon (:) is used to introduce a list. Remember the list of things I had for lunch? For lunch today I had: a cheese sandwich, a packet of crisps, a Fruit Shoot and an apple. Another example: There were a lot of things on Anna’s floor: clothes, books, plastic bags, shoes, papers and a dirty coffee mug she had forgotten to take downstairs.

21 The colon (Part 2) The colon is also used to add further explanation to a point previously made. For example: Schools nowadays are much improved from previously: corporal punishment no longer exists, and teachers generally make an effort to involve and engage students in lessons.

22 The semi-colon Many people get confused about the use of the semi-colon… But it’s not hard! It is used in two main ways.

23 Using the semi-colon (Part 1) One way to use the semi-colon is to separate items in a list in which each item is fairly long and complicated. Let me explain…

24 The semi-colon explained (Part 1) In the sentence ‘For lunch today I had: a cheese sandwich, a packet of crisps, a Fruit Shoot and an apple.’ semi-colons are not needed between the items. They are short and uncomplicated, and only require separating with commas. However, in the sentence ‘I did lots of things at the weekend: I went to the theatre with my friends; I visited my gran for Sunday lunch; I did a huge pile of marking; I created a PowerPoint presentation.’ semi-colons are used to separate the items because they are each quite lengthy. This makes the sentence clearer.

25 Using the semi-colon (Part 2) Another way to use the semi-colon is to separate clauses in a sentence which have equal weight. Let me explain:

26 The semi-colon explained (Part 2) Remember the explanation of main clauses and subordinate clauses? The main clause in a sentence makes complete sense by itself. The subordinate clauses do not make complete sense. They need the main clause to add to their meaning. Sometimes, a sentence does not have a main clause and a subordinate clause. Instead, it has two or more clauses which each have equal weight (as though the sentence had two or more main clauses). For example: Mavis was a student at the local school; she was a hard-working and pleasant girl.

27 The semi-colon explained (Part 3) Here’s that sentence again: Mavis was a Sixth Form student at the local school; she was a hard-working and pleasant girl. Notice that each of the clauses makes complete sense by itself. Each one could be expressed as a sentence: Mavis was a Sixth Form student at the local school. She was a hard-working and pleasant girl. To put it simply…

28 The semi-colon explained (Part 4) A semi-colon is an alternative to a full stop when you want to make two or more short sentences into one long one. Another example: ‘There had been no possibility of taking a walk that day. It had been raining steadily since dawn.’ becomes There had been no possibility of taking a walk that day; it had been raining steadily since dawn. You should always use a semi-colon and not a comma in this situation.

29 Article – ‘Write an article for a travel magazine about a place that you think will be good to visit for a holiday.’

30

31 English Writing Practice Mrs Hallam Would like you to select appropriate vocabulary and spell with a higher level of accuracy. Like Comment 55 minutes ago Great student Today I Like Comment Mrs Hallam like this


Download ppt "English Writing Practise Mrs Hallam Would like you to organise and present whole texts effectively, sequencing and structuring information, ideas and."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google