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Taconic Little League Coaches Presentation Ryan Stevens, ATC, CSCS Spring 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Taconic Little League Coaches Presentation Ryan Stevens, ATC, CSCS Spring 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Taconic Little League Coaches Presentation Ryan Stevens, ATC, CSCS Spring 2008

2 Introduction What is going to be covered in this presentation? Injury Prevention Injury Prevention Management of Common Athletic Injuries Management of Common Athletic Injuries Throwing Drills for Players Throwing Drills for Players Important Things to Remember Important Things to Remember M.O.S.T. Free Evaluations M.O.S.T. Free Evaluations

3 Injury Prevention Nutritional considerations Nutritional considerations Hydration Hydration Attempt to drink ounces of water/day (not including what you drink while at practice/games) Attempt to drink ounces of water/day (not including what you drink while at practice/games) Water is essential for all biochemical functions in the body, and dehydration is one of the most common causes of acute decreased sports performance. Water is essential for all biochemical functions in the body, and dehydration is one of the most common causes of acute decreased sports performance. Just because you are not thirsty does not mean that your body does not need water. Just because you are not thirsty does not mean that your body does not need water. Athletes should try to drink a least 32 extra ounces on days when long, intense practices or events are occurring. Athletes should try to drink a least 32 extra ounces on days when long, intense practices or events are occurring. 8 ounces before playing 8 ounces before playing 8 ounces every hour. 8 ounces every hour. Also, try to avoid caffeinated drinks while exercising Also, try to avoid caffeinated drinks while exercising Caffeine has a diuretic effect = can lead to dehydration Caffeine has a diuretic effect = can lead to dehydration

4 Injury Prevention Nutritional considerations Nutritional considerations Nutritional status can play a large part in performance! Nutritional status can play a large part in performance! Athletes require plenty of energy – eat often (5-6x/day!) Athletes require plenty of energy – eat often (5-6x/day!) Especially important to have something to eat within 1 hour of finishing practice or game – replace lost nutrients and fuel the body for recovery! Especially important to have something to eat within 1 hour of finishing practice or game – replace lost nutrients and fuel the body for recovery! Foods selection and recommendations Foods selection and recommendations Be sure to check out “Nutritional Recommendations for Athletes” on Taconic Little League Website Be sure to check out “Nutritional Recommendations for Athletes” on Taconic Little League Website

5 Injury Prevention Proper Warm-up Proper Warm-up Dynamic warm-up Dynamic warm-up Why do it? Why do it? Increase blood flow to the muscles, increasing core body temperature Increase blood flow to the muscles, increasing core body temperature Activates muscle groups and stimulates the nervous system Activates muscle groups and stimulates the nervous system Increases joint mobility Increases joint mobility Increases coordination and balance Increases coordination and balance Studies show that it decreases chance of injury Studies show that it decreases chance of injury Be sure to check out the complete recommended “Dynamic Warm-up” on the Taconic Little League Website! Be sure to check out the complete recommended “Dynamic Warm-up” on the Taconic Little League Website!

6 Injury Prevention Stretching Stretching More important following vs. before activity More important following vs. before activity Can be utilized before activity (after warm up) when dealing with tight or sore muscles Can be utilized before activity (after warm up) when dealing with tight or sore muscles Hold stretches for 15 seconds, 2 times each Hold stretches for 15 seconds, 2 times each

7 Management of Common Athletic Injuries Heat-related illness Heat-related illness Most common type – Heat cramps Most common type – Heat cramps “Red flags” “Red flags” Stomach/Muscle cramps Stomach/Muscle cramps Light headedness, dizziness, headache, nausea Light headedness, dizziness, headache, nausea Lethargy Lethargy Feinting Feinting Altered or loss of consciousness Altered or loss of consciousness Heavy sweating Heavy sweating Red, hot, dry skin Red, hot, dry skin

8 Heat-Related Illness Initial Care of Heat Cramps Initial Care of Heat Cramps HYDRATE!! HYDRATE!! Ice packs on cramping muscles, light stretching Ice packs on cramping muscles, light stretching If not noticed early, can lead to heat exhaustion or even heat stroke If not noticed early, can lead to heat exhaustion or even heat stroke Remove from heat – get into Air Conditioned building if possible Remove from heat – get into Air Conditioned building if possible Cool body using cool towels, ice, water Cool body using cool towels, ice, water Seek medical attention immediately if: Seek medical attention immediately if: Loss of or altered consciousness Loss of or altered consciousness Athlete appears to be acting “not like him/herself” Athlete appears to be acting “not like him/herself” Stop sweating (dry hot red skin) Stop sweating (dry hot red skin) Vomiting/Dry heaves Vomiting/Dry heaves

9 Heat-Related Illness Return to play criteria Return to play criteria If simply heat cramps - next day if fully recovered and properly rehydrated (may have some muscle soreness) If simply heat cramps - next day if fully recovered and properly rehydrated (may have some muscle soreness) Advanced heat illness – clearance needed by physician Advanced heat illness – clearance needed by physician

10 Common Athletic Injuries Head injury (concussion) Head injury (concussion) “Red flags” – can show up initially, or take days or weeks to appear. “Red flags” – can show up initially, or take days or weeks to appear.

11 Head Injury (Concussion) Initial Care Initial Care Seek medical attention right away if you think the athlete may have a concussion. Better to err on the side of caution. Allow trained professional to decided severity of case Seek medical attention right away if you think the athlete may have a concussion. Better to err on the side of caution. Allow trained professional to decided severity of case Keep athlete out of play. Concussions take time to heal. Do not let the athlete return to play until cleared by a physician. Keep athlete out of play. Concussions take time to heal. Do not let the athlete return to play until cleared by a physician. Returning too soon poses a greater risk of a recurrent, more serious concussion which may cause permanent brain damage or, in some severe cases, death. Returning too soon poses a greater risk of a recurrent, more serious concussion which may cause permanent brain damage or, in some severe cases, death. Make sure all of the athlete’s coaches are aware of the concussion and when s/he will be permitted to return to participation. Make sure all of the athlete’s coaches are aware of the concussion and when s/he will be permitted to return to participation. Remind your athlete: Better to miss a few games than to miss an entire season…or multiple seasons. Remind your athlete: Better to miss a few games than to miss an entire season…or multiple seasons. Return to play criteria – Determined by qualified healthcare professional. Return to play criteria – Determined by qualified healthcare professional.

12 Common Athletic Injuries Joint sprain Joint sprain Common types – ankle, wrist, foot, elbow, knee, finger, foot Common types – ankle, wrist, foot, elbow, knee, finger, foot “Red flags” “Red flags” Swelling and/or discoloration Swelling and/or discoloration Loss of motion Loss of motion Severe pain impairing function (i.e. limping) Severe pain impairing function (i.e. limping) Initial Care Initial Care R.I.C.E. R.I.C.E. Should not be participating if any “red flags” present Should not be participating if any “red flags” present If leg/ankle injury and limping, make use of crutches (even if short term) If leg/ankle injury and limping, make use of crutches (even if short term) Care for injuries sooner than later; minor injuries can become serious over time if not cared for Care for injuries sooner than later; minor injuries can become serious over time if not cared for Seek assessment from trained medical professional if “red flags” present for >3 days (or sooner if able) Seek assessment from trained medical professional if “red flags” present for >3 days (or sooner if able)

13 Joint Sprains Return to play criteria Return to play criteria Resolution of “red flags” Resolution of “red flags” Normal biomechanics returned (i.e. no limp) Normal biomechanics returned (i.e. no limp) Minimal (if any) discomfort during play Minimal (if any) discomfort during play Clearance by trained medical professional when severe injury occurs Clearance by trained medical professional when severe injury occurs

14 Common Athletic Injuries Muscle strain Muscle strain Common types – hamstring, calf, shoulder, back, quad Common types – hamstring, calf, shoulder, back, quad “Red flags” “Red flags” Swelling and/or discoloration Swelling and/or discoloration Loss of motion due to muscle spasm or torn muscle/tendon Loss of motion due to muscle spasm or torn muscle/tendon Notable loss of strength in muscle Notable loss of strength in muscle Severe pain impairing function Severe pain impairing function

15 Muscle/Tendon Strain Initial Care Initial Care R.I.C.E. R.I.C.E. Should not be participating if any “red flags” present Should not be participating if any “red flags” present If leg/ankle injury and limping, make use of crutches (even if short term) If leg/ankle injury and limping, make use of crutches (even if short term) Mild-moderate stretching of muscles around injured area as tolerated Mild-moderate stretching of muscles around injured area as tolerated Care for injuries sooner than later; minor injuries can become serious over time if not cared for Care for injuries sooner than later; minor injuries can become serious over time if not cared for Seek assessment from trained medical professional if “red flags” present for >3 days (or sooner if able) Seek assessment from trained medical professional if “red flags” present for >3 days (or sooner if able)

16 Muscle/Tendon Strain Return to play criteria Return to play criteria Resolution of “red flags” Resolution of “red flags” Normal biomechanics returned (i.e. no limp) Normal biomechanics returned (i.e. no limp) Minimal (if any) discomfort during play Minimal (if any) discomfort during play Clearance by trained medical professional when severe injury occurs Clearance by trained medical professional when severe injury occurs

17 Common Athletic Injuries Overuse injuries Overuse injuries Common types – shin splints, arch pain, elbow/shoulder soreness Common types – shin splints, arch pain, elbow/shoulder soreness “Red flags” “Red flags” Same as with sprains and strains Same as with sprains and strains Pain that does not decrease and/or resolve after proper warm up and stretching Pain that does not decrease and/or resolve after proper warm up and stretching

18 Overuse Injuries Initial Care Initial Care R.I.C.E. R.I.C.E. Allow time for injured tissue to recover Allow time for injured tissue to recover Good strategy is 1 week of non-irritating activity, then progressive return if pain-free Good strategy is 1 week of non-irritating activity, then progressive return if pain-free Modified activity – decrease volume and intensity of training to allow pain-free participation Modified activity – decrease volume and intensity of training to allow pain-free participation Stretching and strengthening as appropriate Stretching and strengthening as appropriate

19 Overuse Injuries Return to play criteria Return to play criteria Variable Variable No “red flags” No “red flags” Athlete was given opportunity to “rest” injured body part Athlete was given opportunity to “rest” injured body part If symptoms return quickly even after resting period, seek advice of trained medical professional If symptoms return quickly even after resting period, seek advice of trained medical professional May be later rather than sooner in young athletes to decrease likelihood of long-term problems May be later rather than sooner in young athletes to decrease likelihood of long-term problems

20 Guiding Your Throwing Athletes Throwing drills for players Throwing drills for players Emphasis on proper throwing mechanics and body mechanics. Emphasis on proper throwing mechanics and body mechanics. Things to watch for: Things to watch for: “Opening too soon” “Opening too soon” Lead or stride foot landing too far to the left for righty or to the right for lefty (many times indicative of opening up too much) Lead or stride foot landing too far to the left for righty or to the right for lefty (many times indicative of opening up too much) Do not let ball get behind head in “cocked” phase Do not let ball get behind head in “cocked” phase Lead shoulder to target Lead shoulder to target Follow through to opposite shin Follow through to opposite shin Balanced finish Balanced finish BREAK BAD MECHANICAL HABITS AT AN EARLY AGE – EASIER TO FIX AND LESS POTENTIAL FOR PROBLEMS LATER ON! BREAK BAD MECHANICAL HABITS AT AN EARLY AGE – EASIER TO FIX AND LESS POTENTIAL FOR PROBLEMS LATER ON!

21 Guiding Your Throwing Athletes Drills – still focus on above 6 keys Drills – still focus on above 6 keys Elbow toss Elbow toss Focus on wrist snap Focus on wrist snap Half-kneeling short toss Half-kneeling short toss Upper body throwing (Standing facing partner) Upper body throwing (Standing facing partner) Focus on 90 deg upper body turn, proper arm mechanics, and follow through Focus on 90 deg upper body turn, proper arm mechanics, and follow through Crow-hop toss (short & long) Crow-hop toss (short & long) Use entire body to throw! Use entire body to throw!

22 Important Things to Remember Follow Little League Baseball National Guidelines (updated in 2006) regarding pitchers Follow Little League Baseball National Guidelines (updated in 2006) regarding pitchers Pitch count – Must Keep! Pitch count – Must Keep! years old = 105 pitches per day years old = 105 pitches per day years old = 95 pitches per day years old = 95 pitches per day years old = 85 pitches per day years old = 85 pitches per day 10 years and under = 75 pitches per day 10 years and under = 75 pitches per day Rest periods as outlined in little league national guidelines Rest periods as outlined in little league national guidelines NO EXCEPTIONS! Rules are a result of countless studies proving a need for a pitch count in young athletes! NO EXCEPTIONS! Rules are a result of countless studies proving a need for a pitch count in young athletes!

23 Things to Remember… Promote a focus on pitch location and change of speed when working with pitchers. Promote a focus on pitch location and change of speed when working with pitchers. Do not teach or promote “snap off” curve balls, sliders, or other special pitches involving twisting of the wrist and forearm Do not teach or promote “snap off” curve balls, sliders, or other special pitches involving twisting of the wrist and forearm Especially under the age of 14. Especially under the age of 14. Example: Nolan Ryan Example: Nolan Ryan 27 years in the Majors 27 years in the Majors Minimal elbow problems Minimal elbow problems 4 primary pitches (2 & 4 seam fastball, circle change, and curveball caused by finger pressure and release point (no “snapping”) 4 primary pitches (2 & 4 seam fastball, circle change, and curveball caused by finger pressure and release point (no “snapping”)

24 M.O.S.T. Free Evaluations Why take advantage? Why take advantage? FREE! FREE! Reassuring Reassuring Expedites quality care and safe return to play! Expedites quality care and safe return to play! Office Hours & Locations Office Hours & Locations Main Office 2 Front St Millbrook NY Phone (845) M-F 8:30am-7:00pm the Training Center 2647 Rt 44 Millbrook NY Phone (845) M-F 8:30 am – 5:30 pm

25 Any Questions? ?


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