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Cyberbullying. What is Cyberbullying? When a child, preteen or teen is tormented, threatened, harassed, humiliated, embarrassed or otherwise targeted.

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Presentation on theme: "Cyberbullying. What is Cyberbullying? When a child, preteen or teen is tormented, threatened, harassed, humiliated, embarrassed or otherwise targeted."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cyberbullying

2 What is Cyberbullying? When a child, preteen or teen is tormented, threatened, harassed, humiliated, embarrassed or otherwise targeted by another child, preteen or teen using the Internet, interactive and digital technologies or mobile phones. It is typically not a one-time communication –Unless it involves a death threat or credible threat of bodily harm

3 What is Cyberbullying? Like bullying it involves an imbalance of power, aggression and a negative action that is often repeated Can happen 24/7 and reach you even when you are alone Messages can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a wide audience

4 Two Kinds of Cyberbullying Direct Attacks – messages sent directly to the victim Cyberbullying by Proxy – using others to help Cyberbully the victim, either with or without the accomplice’s knowledge

5 Who are the Parties in Cyberbullying? Target – A person who is the object of an intentional action Offender – A person who intentionally commits acts to hurt or damage someone Bystander – A person who passively stands by and observes without getting involved Upstander – A person who supports and stands up for someone else

6 Harassment: Repeatedly sending offensive, rude, and insulting messages Denigration: Distributing information about another that is derogatory and untrue through posting it on a Web page, sending it to others through email or instant messaging, or posting or sending digitally altered photos of someone. Making offensive, hurtful, or untrue statements about a person Common Forms of Cyberbullying

7 Flaming: Online "fighting" using electronic messages with angry, vulgar language or sending angry or confrontational messages to inflame the situation Impersonation: Breaking into an email or social networking account and using that person's online identity to send or post vicious or embarrassing material to/about others Common Forms of Cyberbullying

8 Outing and Trickery: Sharing someone's secrets or embarrassing information, or tricking someone into revealing secrets or embarrassing information and forwarding it to others Exclusion: intentionally using online means to exclude a person from a group or activity Common Forms of Cyberbullying

9 Cyber Stalking: Repeatedly sending messages that include threats of harm or are highly intimidating, or engaging in other online activities that make a person afraid for his or her safety (depending on the content of the message, it may be illegal)

10 Examples of Cyberbullying: Spreading rumors online Sending mean messages or threats to a person’s email account or cell phone Posting hurtful or threatening messages on social networking sites or web pages Pretending to be someone else to hurt someone online

11 Examples of Cyberbullying: Taking unflattering pictures and spreading them on cell phones or the internet Sexting or circulating sexually suggestive pictures or messages about a person Stealing a person’s password and sending messages with it –Note….NEVER share your Internet passwords with anyone, except your parents

12 Are you a Cyberbully? Take out a piece of paper…. Write your name, today’s date and the title of Cyberbullying on the top of your paper Down the left side of your paper write the number 1-19 As we read through the following statements write Yes or No next to each corresponding number to say whether or not you have done what the statement says

13 Are you a Cyberbully? Have you ever... 1.Signed on with someone else’s screen name to gather info? 2.Sent an e-mail or online greeting card from someone’s account? 3.Impersonated someone over IM or online? 4.Teased or frightened someone over IM? 5.Not told someone who you really are online, telling them to “guess”?

14 Are you a Cyberbully? 6.Forwarded a private IM conversation or e-mail without the permission of the other person? 7.Changed your profile or away message designed to embarrass or frighten someone? 8.Posted pictures or information about someone on a Web site without their consent?

15 Are you a Cyberbully? 9.Created an Internet poll, either over IM or on a Web site, about someone without their consent? 10.Used information found online to follow, tease, embarrass or harass someone in person? 11.Sent rude or scary things to someone, even if you were just joking?

16 Are you a Cyberbully? 12.Used bad language online? 13.Signed someone else up for something online without their permission? 14.Used an IM or e-mail address that looked like someone else’s? 15.Used someone else’s password for any reason without their permission?

17 Are you a Cyberbully? 16.Hacked into someone else’s computer or sent a computer virus to them? 17.Insulted someone in an interactive game room? 18.Posted rude things or lies about someone online? 19.Voted at an online bashing poll or posted to a guestbook saying rude or mean things?

18 Now calculate your total score: 0 – 5 Points: Cyber Saint Congratulations! You’re a cyber saint! Your online behavior is exemplary! Keep up the good work! 6-10 Points: Cyber Risky Well, you’re not perfect, but few people are. Chances are you haven’t done anything terrible and were just having fun, but try not to repeat your behaviors, since they are all offenses. Keep in mind the pain that your fun might be causing others!

19 Now calculate your total score: 11-18 Points: Cyber Sinner Your online behavior needs to be improved! You have done way too many cyber no-no’s! Keep in mind that these practices are dangerous, wrong, and punishable and try to be clean up that cyber record! More than 18: Cyberbully Put on the brakes and turn that PC/MAC/text- messaging device around! You are headed in a very bad direction. You qualify, without doubt, as a Cyberbully. You need to sign off and think about where that little mouse of yours has been clicking before serious trouble results for you and/or your victim(s), if it hasn’t happened already!

20 Consequences Most students believe what they do at home cannot effect them at school…. When it comes to Cyberbulling… THEY ARE WRONG

21 Consequences If we receive a report that you are Cyberbulling another student, a referral will be written and if found to be true, discipline will be enforced Discipline can range from mandatory participation in the Harrassment Intervention Program (HIP) to Expulsion Police Officers may become involved and criminal action can be taken if the threat is serious

22 If it happens to you… Ignore the messages Do not reply to messages, especially if you don’t know who sent it Do not try to get back at the bully by something mean. Do not forward the message Save a copy of any harassing messages Report bullying to trusted adult. Report bullying that is interfering with school to a school official or teacher

23 If it happens to you Block incoming messages from the Cyberbully Report Cyberbullying to the offender’s online service provider or to other authorities. Most importantly, do not respond to the bully, do not play their games. Do not answer emails, do not respond to posts, do not engage in a chat room exchange and do not copy what the bully is doing. Ignore the bullying and get help from parents and teachers.

24 If it happens to you Save the evidence so that school officials, internet providers and even the police can properly deal with the bully. Cyberbullying may give bullies anonymity but it always leaves evidence. If you get even one communication that includes a threat of bodily harm or a death threat the police should be alerted. Be aware that urging suicide is considered a death threat and the police will treat accordingly.

25 How to Help a Friend who is Cyberbullied Stand up to the offender when appropriate If you see something negative, say something –Make it clear that you think online cruelty is wrong, and tell the offender to back off Point out the bully’s motivation to the target –Comfort the target by explaining that many offenders act cruelly just to gain control, power or status Help the target advocate Help the target find friends and school leaders who can help de-escalate the situation. It’s easier to stand up to cruelty when you are not alone

26 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline 43% of teens have been victims of Cyberbullying in the last year

27 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline Nearly 20% of teens had a Cyberbully pretend to be someone else in order to trick them online, getting them to reveal personal information

28 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline 17% of teens were victimized by someone lying about them online

29 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline Only 11% of teens talked to parents about incidents of Cyberbullying

30 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline 10% of teens were victimized because someone posted unflattering pictures of them online, without permission

31 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline 13% of teens learned that a Cyberbully was pretending to be them while communicating with someone else

32 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline Nearly 30% of teens wanted to seek revenge on those who Cyberbullied them

33 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline Teens currently use their own methods to counter Cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: 36% asked the bully to stop 34% blocked communication 34% talked to friends about the bullying 29% did nothing about the bullying 28% signed offline

34 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline Over 70% of teens said that being able to block Cyberbullies was the most effective method of prevention

35 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline 81% of youth said that others Cyberbully because they think it’s funny

36 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline Cyberbullying victims were almost TWICE as likely to have attempted suicide compared to youth who had not experienced Cyberbullying

37 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline TAKE BACK THE POWER

38 Teens currently use their own methods to counter cyberbullying, and many teens respond with a variety of reactions: Thirty-six percent asked the bully to stop Thirty-four percent blocked communication Thirty-four percent talked to friends about the bullying Twenty-nine percent did nothing about the bullying Twenty-eight percent signed offline STAND UP AGAINST CYBERBULLYING

39 Reflection Essay On the other side of your paper, please take the rest of the period to answer the following question: Think back to all of the activities that took place during “Celebrating Differences Week” including this lesson. What is one thing that had an impact on you and why? Remember to use your RACE writing strategies: Restate the Question Answer the Question Cite – cite where and when the activity took place Explain – how it had an impact on you Make sure you re-read your response and check for clarity before turning it in to your teacher.

40 Sources http://www.cyberbullying.us/cyberbullying_and_s uicide_research_fact_sheet.pdfhttp://www.cyberbullying.us/cyberbullying_and_s uicide_research_fact_sheet.pdf http://www.ncpc.org/newsroom/current- campaigns/cyberbullyinghttp://www.ncpc.org/newsroom/current- campaigns/cyberbullying http://www.violencepreventionworks.org/public/c yber_bullying.pagehttp://www.violencepreventionworks.org/public/c yber_bullying.page http://teenadvice.about.com/od/schoolviolence/a /cyberbullying1.htmhttp://teenadvice.about.com/od/schoolviolence/a /cyberbullying1.htm http://www.ncpc.org/resources/files/pdf/bullying /cyberbullying.pdfhttp://www.ncpc.org/resources/files/pdf/bullying /cyberbullying.pdf


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