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USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENGAGE STUDENTS WITH FEEDBACK ON ASSESSED WORK Dr Fiona Handley, Centre for Learning and Teaching.

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Presentation on theme: "USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENGAGE STUDENTS WITH FEEDBACK ON ASSESSED WORK Dr Fiona Handley, Centre for Learning and Teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENGAGE STUDENTS WITH FEEDBACK ON ASSESSED WORK Dr Fiona Handley, Centre for Learning and Teaching

2 ISSUES IN FEEDBACK ON ASSESSED WORK

3 What is the purpose of giving students feedback on assessed work?

4 To close the gap between the teacher’s concept or understanding and the student’s concept or understanding

5 What is the purpose of giving students feedback on assessed work? To close the gap between the teacher’s concept or understanding and the student’s concept or understanding Staff concept Student concept Feedback

6 Types of feedback: Corrective Feedforward Immediate Delayed Main sources of feedback: Tutors Student him/herself Staff concept Student concept Feedback

7 The work of Royce Sadler, David Nicol and Graham Gibbs have been particularly influential in conceptualising this gap and suggesting ways to bridge it. For example: Formative feedback opportunities (Gibbs) Dialogic approaches to feedback (Nicol) Reviewing – self and peer (Nicol) Complex appraissal (Sadler) All these are about increasing activity around that feedback loop.

8 “The most problematic aspect of the classical feedback model is that assessors (whether academics or student peers) are the ones who do the noticing, the thinking about repair and modification, and the generation of ways to improve” Sadler 2013 Opening Up Feedback: Teaching learners to see. In Merry, S. et al (Eds) Reconceptualising Feedback in Higher Education: Developing dialogue with students. London: Routledge p

9 WAYS OF ENGAGING STUDENTS WITH FEEDBACK

10 Legible handwriting Use variety of feedback types Structure feedback to assessment criteria Hand back assessments in class Return feedback quickly

11 Legible handwriting Use variety of feedback types Structure feedback to assessment criteria Hand back assessments in class Return feedback quickly Not revealing mark until feedback collected or read

12 Legible handwriting Use variety of feedback types Structure feedback to assessment criteria Hand back assessments in class Return feedback quickly Not revealing mark until feedback collected or read Tutor gives generic feedback to whole class, students consider how it applies to them

13 Legible handwriting Use variety of feedback types Structure feedback to assessment criteria Hand back assessments in class Return feedback quickly Not revealing mark until feedback collected or read Tutor gives generic feedback to whole class, students consider how it applies to them Students mark each other’ work and practice giving feedback

14 Legible handwriting Use variety of feedback types Structure feedback to assessment criteria Hand back assessments in class Return feedback quickly Not revealing mark until feedback collected or read Tutor gives generic feedback to whole class, students consider how it applies to them Students mark each other’s work and practice giving feedback The next assignment includes a section where the student states how they have addressed feedback

15 TECHNOLOGICAL RESPONSES

16 eFeedback tools Blackboard’s Assignment tool Turnitin’s Grademark Studentfolio Stand alone tools Blogs, wikis, discussion boards Rubrics, Quickmarks Group work, Peer mark Audio, video Marked up texts or images Online quiz feedback Using technologies including: Desktop computers, laptops, tablets, smart phones And platforms including: VLEs, classroom technologies such as Polleverywhere & Nearpod, social media, discipline specific apps

17 Basic ‘hygiene’ factors covered by eFeedback: Variety of forms of feedback (text, rubrics, audio, video, short comments etc, and in combinations) Typewritten feedback (mostly!) Speed of return (online quizzes, feedback instantly available on mobile devices)

18 Digitization of ‘paper-based’ ways of engaging, for example: Burying marks within audio feedback Requiring students to write learning points from feedback to activate release of grades (Sheffield Hallam) Completing a section on an online cover sheet (University of Dundee; Institute of Education) Use of QuickMark banks to link to further resources

19 University of Brighton School of Health Sciences QuickMark set to use in GradeMark Speeds up marking Ensure consistency Highlights guidance for future work Can link to other resources such as academic writing support materials

20 New tools and new approaches for example: online collaboration tools such as Nearpod and PollEverywhere for engaging students with generic feedback in class using ePortfolios as a reflective tool using wikis (Dundee) an online questionnaire (IoE, Westminster) a blog entry (IoE, Westminster) These are key ways of ‘closing the feedback loop’.

21 University of Westminster’s MACE/eReflect 3.2 Students complete online questionnaire and reflective blog, and receive an automatically generated report Questionnaire creation by staff, completion by students, report generation and storage, and updating/sharing of the learning journal all completed in one system. System of alerts via which communicates when a tutee has completed a reflection, and when the tutor has commented.

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23 University of Westminster’s MACE/eReflect 3.2 Students complete online questionnaire and reflective blog, and receive an automatically generated report Questionnaire creation by staff, completion by students, report generation and storage, and updating/sharing of the learning journal all completed in one system. System of alerts via which communicates when a tutee has completed a reflection, and when the tutor has commented.

24 Automated feedback Open University’s Interactive Computer Marked Assignments (ICMAs) Large cohorts = strong analytics Uses pattern matching software to generate responses (Jordan 2012)

25 Drawing feedback together Development of a ‘feedback store’ was a recommendation from Sheffield Hallam’s project Making Connections Development of a moodle plug-in to draw together past marks and feedback from across modules for staff (IoE) An in-house VLE where students can see all feedback on current and past modules in one place (Essex) App which draws together marks and feedback from across different marking platforms (Portsmouth)

26 University of Portsmouth MyFeedback App

27 FEEDBACK DASHBOARDS Linked to discussion forums Tagging feedback Built in group activities Analytics on engagement All feedback from all sources in one place Accessible by tutors Linked to PDP Allows comparison to other students Links to programme learning outcomes

28 Other technologies HapticsSimMan Location aware

29 BEARING FRUIT?

30 The NMC Horizon Report 2014 predicts in the medium to long term an increased focus on: Learning analytics Data driven learning and assessment Evolution of online learning Games and gamification Personalized learning and adaptive learning software Finding new ways to analyse and represent data sets

31 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflection

32 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflectionPeers More advanced students

33 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflectionPeers More advanced students External community

34 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflectionPeers More advanced students External community Computer generated

35 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflectionPeers More advanced students External community Computer generated Learning Analytics

36 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflectionPeers More advanced students External community Computer generated Learning Analytics

37 Staff conceptStudent concept Feedback Tutor Self - reflectionPeers More advanced students External community Computer generated Learning Analytics Student concept

38 Ways forward: Developing ways of more voices into feedback, breaking down the tutor – feedback – student loop. Possibilities of using feedback beyond individual assignments Surfacing of feedback More automated feedback based on student response and on other student data More data on how students engage with feedback

39 References cited Gibbs, G Principles of assessment guides/127-principles-of-assessmenthttp://www.testa.ac.uk/index.php/resources/best-practice- guides/127-principles-of-assessment Jordan, S. (2012) "Student Engagement with Assessment and Feedback: Some Lessons from Short- Answer Free-Text E-Assessment Questions", Computers & Education, 58 (2) pp MACE report https://sites.google.com/a/staff.westminster.ac.uk/mace/e-reflecthttps://sites.google.com/a/staff.westminster.ac.uk/mace/e-reflect Nicol, D. J. & Macfarlane-Dick, D. (2006). Formative assessment and self-regulated learning: A model and seven principles of good feedback practice. Studies in Higher Education, 31(2), Nicol, D. [2010] From monologue to dialogue: improving written feedback processes in mass higher education. In Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education Vol 35 No. 5 August Sadler, D. R Opening Up Feedback: Teaching learners to see. In Merry, S. et al (Eds) Reconceptualising Feedback in Higher Education: Developing dialogue with students. London: Routledge p Sadler, D. R Beyond feedback: developing student capability in complex appraisal. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35, Lots of information on initiatives can be found at forwardhttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/feedback-and-feed- forward

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