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Chapter: Invertebrate Animals Table of Contents Section 3: Mollusks and Segmented WormsMollusks and Segmented Worms Section 1: What is an animal? Section.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter: Invertebrate Animals Table of Contents Section 3: Mollusks and Segmented WormsMollusks and Segmented Worms Section 1: What is an animal? Section."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Chapter: Invertebrate Animals Table of Contents Section 3: Mollusks and Segmented WormsMollusks and Segmented Worms Section 1: What is an animal? Section 2: Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and RoundwormsSponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms Section 4: Arthropods and EchinodermsArthropods and Echinoderms

4 What makes an animal an animal? Animals are many-celled organisms that are made of different kinds of cells. Most animal cells have a nucleus and organelles. The nucleus and many organelles are surrounded by a membrane. This type of cell is called a eukaryotic (yew ker ee AH tihk) cell. Animal Characteristics 1 1 What is an animal?

5 Animals cannot make their own food. Animals digest their food. Most animals can move from place to place. Animal Characteristics 1 1 What is an animal?

6 Symmetry refers to the arrangement of the individual parts of an object that can be divided into similar halves. Animals with body parts arranged in a circle around a central point have radial symmetry. Symmetry 1 1 What is an animal?

7 Animals with bilateral symmetry have parts that are nearly mirror images of each other. A line can be drawn down the center of their bodies to divide them into two similar parts. Symmetry 1 1 What is an animal?

8 Some animals have an irregular shape. They are called asymmetrical (AY suh meh trih kul). Symmetry 1 1 What is an animal? They have bodies that cannot be divided into similar halves.

9 Scientists place all animals into smaller, related groups. They can begin by separating animals into two distinct groups—vertebrates and invertebrates. Animal Classification 1 1 What is an animal? Vertebrates (VUR tuh bruts) are animals that have a backbone.

10 Invertebrates (ihn VUR tuh bruts) are animals that do not have a backbone. About 97 percent of all animals are invertebrates. Animal Classification 1 1 What is an animal?

11 Scientists classify the invertebrates into smaller groups, as shown. The animals within each group share similar characteristics. Animal Classification 1 1 What is an animal?

12 Question 1 Answer How do animals get food? Animals can not make their own food. They must eat plants or other animals to supply their energy needs. Section Check 1 1 IN: 6.4.3

13 1 1 Section Check Question 2 Which has radial symmetry? A. lobster B. sea anemone C. sponge D. none of them IN: 6.4.3

14 1 1 Section Check Answer The sea anemone has radial symmetry. Symmetry refers to the arrangement of the parts of an animal. Animals with radial symmetry have body parts arranged in a circle around a central point. IN: 6.4.3

15 1 1 Section Check Question 3 Which describes most of the cells found in animals? A. they have bilateral symmetry B. they have a nucleus and many organelles C. they help animals move D. they help in reproduction IN: 6.4.3, 6.4.5

16 1 1 Section Check Answer The correct answer is B. The cells found in animals are called eukaryotic cells. Animals are made of many different kinds of cells. IN: 6.4.3, 6.4.5

17 Sponges For a long time scientists didn’t know how to classify sponges. Originally they thought sponges were plants because they don’t move to search for food. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

18 Sponges Sponges, however, can’t make their own food as most plants do. Sponges are animals. 2 2 Adult sponges are sessile (SE sul), meaning they remain attached to one place. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

19 Filter Feeders Sponge bodies are made of two layers of cells. All sponges are filter feeders. 2 2 They filter food out of the water that flows through their bodies. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

20 Filter Feeders The inner surface of the central cavity is lined with collar cells. Thin, whiplike structures, called flagella (flah JEH luh), extend from the collar cells and keep the water moving through the sponge. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

21 Body Support and Defense The soft bodies of many sponges are supported by sharp, glass-like structures called spicules (SPIHK yewlz). Other sponges have a material called spongin. 2 2 Spongin is similar to foam rubber because it makes sponges soft and elastic. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms Click image to view movie.

22 Sponge Reproduction Sponges can reproduce asexually and sexually. Asexual reproduction occurs when a bud on the side of the parent sponge develops into a small sponge. 2 2 The new sponge breaks off, floats away, and attaches itself to a new surface. New sponges also may grow from pieces of a sponge. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

23 Sponge Reproduction Most sponges that reproduce sexually are hermaphrodites (hur MA fruh dites). This means that one sponge produces both eggs and sperm. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

24 Cnidarians Cnidarians (nih DAR ee uns), such as jellyfish, sea anemones, hydra, and corals, have tentacles surrounding their mouth. The tentacles shoot out stinging cells called nematocysts (NE ma toh sihsts) to capture prey, similar to casting a fishing line into the water to catch a fish. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

25 Cnidarians Cnidarians are hollow-bodied animals with two cell layers that are organized into tissues. The inner layer forms a digestive cavity where food is broken down. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

26 Cnidarians Oxygen moves into the cells from the surrounding water, and carbon dioxide waste moves out of the cells. Nerve cells work together as a nerve net throughout the whole body. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

27 Body Forms Cnidarians have two different body forms. The vase-shaped body of the sea anemone and the hydra is called a polyp (PAH lup). 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

28 Body Forms Jellyfish have a free- swimming, bell- shaped body that is called a medusa (mih DEW suh). Jellyfish are not strong swimmers. Instead, they drift with the ocean currents. 2 2 Some cnidarians go through both a polyp and a medusa stage during their life cycles. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

29 Cnidarian Reproduction Cnidarians reproduce asexually and sexually. Polyp forms of cnidarians, such as hydras, reproduce asexually by budding. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

30 Cnidarian Reproduction Some polyps also can reproduce sexually by releasing eggs or sperm into the water. The eggs are fertilized by sperm and develop into new polyps. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

31 Cnidarian Reproduction Cnidarians that spend most of their life as a medusa have a sexual (medusa) stage and an asexual (polyp) stage. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

32 Cnidarian Reproduction 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

33 Flatworms Flatworms are invertebrates with long, flattened bodies and bilateral symmetry. 2 2 Their soft bodies have three layers of tissue organized into organs and organ systems. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

34 Flatworms Planarians are free-living flatworms that have a digestive system with one opening. 2 2 They don’t depend on one particular organism for food or a place to live. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms Click image to view movie.

35 Flatworms Most flatworms are parasites that live in or on their hosts. 2 2 A parasite depends on its host for food and shelter. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

36 Tapeworms One type of parasitic flatworm is the tapeworm. 2 2 To survive, it lives in the intestines of its host, including human hosts. The tapeworm lacks a digestive system so it absorbs nutrients from digested material in the host’s intestine. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

37 Tapeworms A tapeworm grows by adding sections directly behind its head. 2 2 Each body segment has both male and female reproductive organs. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

38 Tapeworms 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

39 Roundworms Roundworms are the most widespread animal on Earth. 2 2 Billions can live in an acre of soil. A roundworm’s body is described as a tube within a tube, with a fluid-filled cavity in between the two tubes. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

40 Roundworms The cavity separates the digestive tract from the body wall. 2 2 Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms Roundworms are more complex than flatworms because their digestive tract has two openings.

41 Roundworms Food enters through the mouth, is digested in a digestive tract, and wastes exit through the anus. 2 2 Some roundworms are decomposers, others are predators, and some, like the heartworm, are animal parasites. Other roundworms are plant parasites. Sponges, Cnidarians, Flatworms, and Roundworms

42 Question 1 Answer How do cnidarians use nematocysts? Nematocysts, or stinging cells, are used to capture prey. Section Check 2 2 IN: 6.4.3

43 2 2 Section Check Question 2 This diagram of a sponge shows that sponges _______. IN: 6.4.3

44 2 2 Section Check A. are hermaphrodites B. produce buds C. reproduce asexually D. use spicules for production IN: 6.4.3

45 2 2 Section Check Answer The correct answer is A. Most sponges that reproduce sexually are hermaphrodites. Both sperm and eggs are produced from the same sponge. IN: 6.4.3

46 Question 3 Which of the following describes the body of a roundworm? A. a medusa B. a polyp C. a tube within a tube D. has two cell layers Section Check 2 2 IN: 6.4.3

47 2 2 Section Check Answer The correct answer is C. The two tubes are separated by a fluid-filled cavity. The inner tube is the digestive tract. IN: 6.4.3

48 Mollusks Imagine yourself walking along an ocean beach at low tide. On the rocks, you see small snails with conelike shells. In a small tidal pool, one arm of a shy octopus can be seen at the opening of its den. How are these different animals related? What do they have in common? 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

49 Common Characteristics Mollusks are soft-bodied invertebrates that usually have a shell. They also have a mantle and a large, muscular foot. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

50 Common Characteristics 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms The mantle is a thin layer of tissue that covers the mollusk’s soft body. If the mollusk has a shell, it is secreted by the mantle.

51 Common Characteristics Between the mantle and the soft body is a space called the mantle cavity. Gills are organs in which carbon dioxide from the animal is exchanged for oxygen in the water. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Land-dwelling mollusks have lungs in which carbon dioxide from the animal is exchanged for oxygen in the air.

52 Body Systems Mollusks have a digestive system with two openings. Many mollusks also have a scratchy, tonguelike organ called the radula. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms The radula (RA juh luh) has rows of fine, teethlike projections that the mollusk uses to scrape off small bits of food.

53 Body Systems Some mollusks have an open circulatory system, which means they do not have vessels to contain their blood. The blood washes over the organs, which are grouped together in a fluid-filled body cavity. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

54 Types of Mollusks - Gastropods Gastropods are the largest group of mollusks. Most gastropods, such as the snails and conchs, have one shell. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Slugs also are gastropods, but they don’t have a shell. Gastropods live in water or on land. All move about on a large, muscular foot.

55 Bivalves A bivalve is an organism with two shell halves joined by a hinge. Large, powerful muscles open and close the shell halves. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Bivalves are water animals that also are filter feeders. Food is removed from water that is brought into and filtered through the gills.

56 Cephalopods The most complex type of mollusks are cephalopods (SE fah lah pawdz). Most cephalopods have an internal plate instead of a shell. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

57 Cephalopods 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms They have a well-developed head and a “foot” that is divided into tentacles with strong suckers.

58 Cephalopods They have a closed circulatory system in which blood is carried through blood vessels instead of surrounding the organs. Cephalopods are adapted for quick movement in the ocean. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Water enters the space between the mantle and the other body organs.

59 Cephalopods 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms When the mantle closes around the collar of the cephalopod, the water is squeezed rapidly through a funnel-like structure called a siphon.

60 Cephalopods 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms The rapid expulsion of water from the siphon creates a force that causes the animal to move in the opposite direction of the stream of water.

61 Segmented Worms Earthworms, leeches, and marine worms are segmented worms, or annelids (A nul idz). Their body is made of repeating segments or rings that make these worms flexible. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Each segment has nerve cells, blood vessels, part of the digestive tract, and the coelom (SEE lum).

62 Segmented Worms The coelom, or internal body cavity, separates the internal organs from the body wall. Annelids have a closed circulatory system and a complete digestive system with two body openings. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

63 Earthworms Earthworms have more than 100 body segments. Each segment has external bristlelike structures called setae (SEE tee). 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Earthworms use the setae to grip the soil while two sets of muscles move them through the soil.

64 Earthworms Earthworms get the energy they need to live from organic matter found in the soil. From the mouth the soil moves to the crop, where it is stored. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Behind the crop is a muscular structure called the gizzard.

65 Earthworms Here, the soil and food are ground. In the intestine, the food is broken down and absorbed by the blood. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Undigested soil and wastes leave the worm through the anus.

66 Earthworms Carbon dioxide passes out and oxygen passes in through its mucous-covered skin. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Earthworms and other segmented worms have many organ systems, including circulatory, reproductive, excretory, digestive, and muscular systems.

67 Leeches These segmented worms have flat bodies from 5 mm to 460 mm long with sucking disks on both ends. They use these disks to attach themselves to an animal and remove blood. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

68 Leeches Although leeches prefer a diet of blood, most of them can survive indefinitely on small aquatic animals. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms

69 Marine Worms Polychaetes (PAH lee keets) are the largest and most diverse group of annelids. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms The word polychaete means “many bristles.” Most marine worms have bristles, or setae, along the sides of their body.

70 Marine Worms Because of these bristles, marine worms are sometimes called bristle worms. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Bristles are used for walking, swimming, or digging, depending on the type of marine worm.

71 Body Types Some marine worms are filter feeders. They either burrow into the mud or build their own tube cases and use their featherlike bristles to filter food from the water. 3 3 Mollusks and Segmented Worms Some marine worms move around eating plants or decaying material. Other marine worms are predators or parasites.

72 Question 1 Answer What is the function of the radula that many mollusks have? The radula is used to scrape off small bits of food. It is a scratchy, tonguelike organ that has rows of fine, teethlike projections. Section Check 3 3 IN: 6.4.3

73 3 3 Section Check Question 2 This diagram shows a squid that is _______. IN: 6.4.3

74 3 3 Section Check A. filtering food from water B. moving by expelling water C. squirting water at its enemies D. using water to remove wastes IN: 6.4.3

75 3 3 Section Check Answer The correct answer is B. Squids can use their mantle to squeeze water and squirt it out of a structure called a siphon. When they do this, the force from the expulsion of water, causes the squid to move in the opposite direction of the stream of water. IN: 6.4.3

76 Question 3 Most segmented worms have setae. What are setae? 3 3 Section Check IN: 6.4.3

77 Answer Setae are bristlelike structures found on the external surface of each segment of the worm. Earthworms use setae to grip the soil as they move. Marine worms may use setae for walking, swimming, or digging depending on the type of worm. 3 3 Section Check IN: 6.4.3

78 Arthropods Arthropods (AR thruh pahdz) are the largest and most diverse group of animals. Arthropods are animals that have jointed appendages (uh PEN dih juz). 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Appendages are structures such as claws, legs, and antennae that grow from the body.

79 Arthropods Arthropods have a rigid body covering called an exoskeleton. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms This process is called molting. As the animal grows, the exoskeleton must be shed because it doesn’t grow with the animal. It protects and supports the body and reduces water loss.

80 Arthropods Arthropods have bilateral symmetry and segmented bodies similar to annelids. In most cases, arthropods have fewer, more specialized segments. Instead of setae, they have appendages. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

81 Insects Insects make up the largest group of arthropods. Insects have three body regions—head, thorax, and abdomen. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Sensory organs, including the eyes and antennae, are located on the head.

82 Insects The thorax has three pairs of jointed legs and usually one or two pairs of wings. The abdomen is divided into segments and has neither wings nor legs attached, but reproductive organs are located there. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

83 Circulatory System Insects have an open circulatory system. Oxygen is not transported by blood in the system, but food and waste materials are. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

84 Circulatory System Oxygen is brought directly to the insect’s tissues through small branching tubes. These tubes connect to openings called spiracles (SPIHR ih kulz) located along the sides of the thorax and abdomen. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

85 Metamorphosis Many insects completely change their body form as they mature. This change in body form is called metamorphosis (met uh MOR fuh sus). 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Click box to view movie.

86 Metamorphosis Butterflies, ants, bees, and beetles are examples of insects that undergo complete metamorphosis. Complete metamorphosis has four stages—egg, larva, pupa (PYEW puh), and adult. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

87 Metamorphosis Some insects undergo incomplete metamorphosis. They have only three stages— egg, nymph, and adult. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

88 Arachnids Spiders, ticks, mites, and scorpions belong to a group of arthropods known as arachnids (uh RAK nudz). Arachnids have only two body regions—a cephalothorax (sef uh luh THOR aks) and an abdomen. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

89 Arachnids The cephalothorax is made of the fused head and thorax regions. All arachnids have four pairs of legs attached to the cephalothorax. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms

90 Arachnids Spiders are predators. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms A spider uses a pair of fanglike appendages near its mouth to inject paralyzing venom into its prey.

91 Arachnids 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Then it releases substances into its prey that digest the victim, turning it into a liquid, and the spider drinks it. Other arachnids, like the scorpion, paralyze their prey with venom from their stinger.

92 Centipedes and Millipedes Centipedes and millipedes are long, thin, segmented animals. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms These arthropods have pairs of jointed legs attached to each segment. Centipedes have one pair of jointed legs per segment, and millipedes have two pairs.

93 Centipedes and Millipedes Centipedes are predators that use venom to capture their prey. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Millipedes eat plants.

94 Crustaceans The group of arthropods called crustaceans includes some of the largest arthropods. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms However, most crustaceans are small marine animals that make up the majority of zooplankton. Zooplankton refers to the tiny, free-floating animals that are food for other marine animals.

95 Crustaceans Their body structures vary greatly. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Crustaceans usually have two pairs of antennae attached to the head, three types of chewing appendages, and five pairs of legs.

96 Crustaceans Many water-living crustaceans also have appendages called swimmerets on their abdomen. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Swimmerets force water over the feathery gills where carbon dioxide from the crustacean is exchanged for oxygen in the water.

97 Echinoderms Sea stars, brittle stars, sea urchins, sand dollars, and sea cucumbers are echinoderms. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Echinoderms have spines of various lengths that cover the outside of their bodies. Most echinoderms are supported and protected by an internal skeleton made up of bonelike plates.

98 Echinoderms Echinoderms have a simple nervous system but don’t have heads or brains. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms Some echinoderms are predators, some are filter feeders, and others feed on decaying matter.

99 Water-Vascular System All echinoderms have a water-vascular system. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms It is a network of water-filled canals and thousands of tube feet. The tube feet work like suction cups to help the sea star move and capture prey.

100 Water-Vascular System Sea stars have a unique way of eating. 4 4 Arthropods and Echinoderms The sea star pushes its stomach out of its mouth and into the opened shell of its prey. Like some invertebrates, sea stars can regenerate lost or damaged parts. After the prey’s body is digested and absorbed, the sea star pulls in its stomach.

101 4 4 Section Check Question 1 How are insects different from other arthropods? A. Most of them have wings. B. They have an exoskeleton. C. They have jointed appendages. D. They have segmented bodies. IN: 6.4.3

102 4 4 Section Check Answer The correct answer is A. Most insects have one or two pairs of wings that grow from their thorax. The other characteristics listed are shared by all arthropods. IN: 6.4.3

103 Question 2 What type of metamorphosis is being shown in this diagram? Section Check 4 4 IN: 6.4.3

104 Answer This diagram shows how complete metamorphosis occurs in bees. The four stages of this process are egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Section Check 4 4 IN: 6.4.3

105 Question 3 Answer Why do crustaceans that live in the water include some of the largest arthropods with the heaviest exoskeletons? A large heavy exoskeleton is less limiting in water than on land. Water pushes up against the pull of gravity and helps these animals support their heavy exoskeletons. Section Check 4 4 IN: 6.4.3

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