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Northeastern University Fabrication and Characterization Facilities at the George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center Richard.

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Presentation on theme: "Northeastern University Fabrication and Characterization Facilities at the George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center Richard."— Presentation transcript:

1 Northeastern University Fabrication and Characterization Facilities at the George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center Richard DeVito, Operating Director George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center

2 Northeastern University Outline  Introduction  Characterization Capabilities  Fabrication Capabilities  User Training And Access  Summary

3 Northeastern University Introduction

4 Northeastern University Fabrication and Characterization Facilities at the George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center  The George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center is the primary facility for micro and nanofabrication at Northeastern University. Established through Mr. George J. Kostas '43 generous gift, The facility was completed in January  The Kostas facility also serves as the main facility for the new NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) at Northeastern University, in partnership with the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and the University of New Hampshire.  The facility is open to faculty, students, researchers, coop students, and external users. The facility provides support and materials based on user fees and has capabilities for processing 3,4, and 6 inch wafers as well as smaller parts.

5 Northeastern University Fabrication and Characterization Facilities at the George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center The center consists of 5000 square feet of class 10, 1000, and clean room space

6 Northeastern University Fabrication and Characterization Fabrication Characterization Surface Analysis Profile Analysis Thickness Analysis Surface Scanner Energy Dispersive Analysis V-I Characterization Zeta potential measurement Deposition  PVD; CVD; TVD; EBE; Electroplating Etching  Dry Etch; RIE Lithography – Optical, Electron Beam Cleaning  Ultrasonic; Megasonic; Wet bench Bonders and Flip Chip Aligner

7 Northeastern University Characterization

8 Northeastern University Tencor Laser Surface Scanner Employs Scattering cross-section of laser Light is  nm Can detect particles down to 200nm. 4” to 6” wafer sizes

9 Northeastern University Surface Analysis – Optical Microscopes Excitation ~ 542 nm Emission ~ 612 nm Detect particles 180X Zoom Nikon Optiphot 200D Microscope with a fluorescent attachment

10 Northeastern University Contact Angle Analyzer: SEO Max. Size 6 inch Automatic and rapid sample analysis High-speed dynamic image capture Improved precision and reproducibility Measurement of surface tension and static/dynamic contact angle. Calculation of surface energy and work of adhesion.

11 Northeastern University Surface Analysis, FESEM, Supra-25 Capability: Resolution: 1 30kV; kV Magnification: ,000x Acc Voltage: kV Probe Current: 24pA-10nA Detectors: Secondary In lens (0.2-20kV) EHT (0.2kV-30kV)

12 Northeastern University EDS Analysis – PGT EDS Detector 30 Second Cool down utilizing air-cooled Peltier cooling Operating Temperature 115° C No moving parts No vibration Signal shaping and resolution specification at 1 microsecond

13 Northeastern University Raman Spectroscopy Jobin Yvon Lab Ram HR 800 When monochromatic radiation is incident upon a sample then this light will interact with the sample in some fashion. It may be reflected, absorbed or scattered in some manner. It is the scattering of the radiation that occurs which can tell the Raman spectroscopist something of the samples molecular structure.  The scattering process without a change of frequency is called Rayleigh scattering,  A change in the frequency (wavelength) of the light is called Raman scattering. Raman shifted photons of light can be either of higher or lower energy, depending upon the vibrational state of the molecule.  The Lab Ram has two excitation laser wavelengths of 532 and 785 nm  Band analysis in the order of 0.3cm-1 to 1cm-1 is particularly suited to the HR mode Rayleigh Raman

14 Northeastern University X-Ray Diffraction Panalytical X’Pert Pro 1.8kW sealed X-ray tube source, Cu target vertical circle theta goniometer with a radius of 240mm –rocking curve analysis and reciprocal space mapping –reflectometry and thin film phase analysis –residual stress and texture analysis

15 Northeastern University Profile Analysis – Park Scientific NX10 AFM Surface Profile analysis Sputtered Ti

16 Northeastern University Surface Profile analysis of Patterned Resists Salient Features: Separated X-Y & Z Scanner Nanolithography Fluid cell: Supports all major SPM functions XY Motorized Stage EZ Snap Probe Tip Exchange Low Noise XE System Controller Profile Analysis – PSIA -XE150 SPM

17 Northeastern University Surface Profile Analysis – DEKTAK 3030 Step Profile for Nonmetals & Standard Metal 500A to 50  Typical Profile analysis result

18 Northeastern University ZYGO NewView 6200 Optical Profilometer Fast noncontact measurements Sub-nanometer Z resolution Leading-edge precision & gage capability Enhanced optical imaging Various surfaces: opaque, transparent, coated, uncoated, specular, and nonspecular Vertical Scan Range 150 μm Vertical Res. Up to 0.1 nm Lateral Res to 11.6 μm

19 Northeastern University Thickness Analysis Non-contact, Spectro-Reflectometry NanoSpec Thickness measurement for Multilayer transparent films on Si Max. wafer size 4 inch and max. thickness 1.5 m

20 Northeastern University V-I Characterization – Microprobes Inline Four Probe Method HP system for V-I Characterization of ICs

21 Northeastern University Varian Cary 300 Spectrophotometer Wavelength Range: – nm UV Winlab Software Controlled Spectral Bandwidth –0.2-4 nm in 0.1 nm steps Wavelength Accuracy: – +/-.02 nm Wavelength Reproducibility: – +/ nm Scan Rate(Max) –3000 nm /min Photometric Range – 6 Abs

22 Northeastern University V-I Characterization – Microprobes II Low Temperature/ High Vacuum Janis ST 500 Electrical Probe Station Electrical sample characterization in high vacuum or air or inert atmosphere. sample temperature K with LHe Probe sizes down to 7 microns. It has 4 x-y-z probes and 4 triax connectors on these probes. Frequency response is DC to 10 MHz. It also had the ability to apply a magnetic field using permanent magnets in plane and parallel at 1000 Gauss The system is mounted on a vibration isolation mount and has a CCTV camera mounted to Lieca zoom microscope (not shown)

23 Northeastern University Zyvex Nanomanipulator S-100 Mechanical and electrical characterization. Device quality/failure analysis. Nanostructure/nanomaterial /nanointerconnect R&D. MEMS/IC or microstructure R&D. Surface science experiments. Assembly and manipulation.

24 Northeastern University Zeta Potential Measurement Fully Automated Full ph range Only for aqueous solutions Min. weight percent 1

25 Northeastern University Fabrication

26 Northeastern University Optical Lithography Spinner Vacuum Photo resist   Baking SpinnerBaking Hotplates Ovens

27 Northeastern University Optical Lithography After Development Quintel4000 Optical Aligner Infra Red Mask alignment 6 & 3 inch wafers Optical Exposure Optical Mask Ultra violet light Limitations :  determines the min. pattern width

28 Northeastern University Electron Beam Lithography Nano pattern Generation System (NPGS) Capability down to 15nm patterns Continuous Pattern Writing for 45hours Control of the SEM using REMCON32 Auto alignments and focus for tilt and stage movements Raith Beam Blanker Electrostatic Beam Blanker Operating Frequency is 100 kHz De Broglie Hypothesis FESEM- Carl Zeiss Surpa 25

29 Northeastern University Nano Imprint Lithography Nanonex NX 200 Nanonex NX200 Nano-imprinter

30 Northeastern University Focused Ion Beam (FIB) Zeiss Cross Beam™ 1540XB (dual beam ) Resolution Electron-Beam 1 nm at 20 kV at WD = 2 mm. Resolution Ion-Beam 7 nm (5 nm achievable) Magnification 12x - 900,000x (SEM) Ion Source UHV, with Gallium liquid metal ion source The 1540 is a high performance instrument designed for micro structural sectioning, imaging and analytical applications. The system features unique GEMINI® electron optical column technology and the new Canion 31 FIB column. The 1540XB benefits the user with its flexible handling of a variety of sample types and sizes with a 6-axes motorised high precision super-eucentric stage

31 Northeastern University Deposition – PVD Perkin Elmer 2400 Three 8” Target RF & DC Magnetron Sputtering Target Ar Gas Substrate Patterned Resist RF Field H Permanent Magnets Available Targets: Al, Ni, In 2 O 3 /SNO 2, Mo, Cu, Ti, Si, Si 3 N 4, NiCr, C, Cr, TiW, Au, Ru Mat Vac x 6.5” Targets RF/DC Sputtering

32 Northeastern University Deposition – Thermal Evaporation Up to 4 ” diameter substrates Water cooled substrate holder Two boat deposition Qualified for Cr, Au, MgF 2,Ag,Al

33 Northeastern University Deposition – E-Beam Evaporation 4 pocket-6c.c.crucible/ e-beam deposition system can accept up to 4" substrates Available Material (Metals Only)  Ti - Titanium  Cr - Chromium  Au - Gold  Al - Aluminum  Ni - Nickel

34 Northeastern University Deposition – PECVD Astex LL System SiO x, SiN 2 ECR Electron Cyclotron Resonance High density electron –SiNx without NH3 Down stream Plasma Deposition 5-10 mtorr pressure –Long MFP Excellent Uniformity Low Damage energetics at substrate

35 Northeastern University Deposition – Electroplating Substrate Patterned Resist V Target Electrolytic solution t = Time period N = Number of electrons for stability  density e = Electronic Charge a = Area T = Thickness A = Atomic Weight I = current Available Electrolyte: Au, Zn

36 Northeastern University Deposition – Oxidation SubstrateChemicals Heat Dry Oxidation Wet oxidation Polysilicon deposition Silicon Nitride deposition Silicon Oxide deposition Bruce Furnace with 4 and 6 inch Stacks

37 Northeastern University Annealing Furnace MiniBrute 4” tube –3” substrates –400 C –Inert or H 2 atmosphere

38 Northeastern University Wire Bonders MEI 1204B Ball Bonder MEI 1204 B Hybrid Ball Bonder Bonding Area ~100  X 100  Bonding Metal Au

39 Northeastern University Deposition – TVD, PDS2010 Biocompatibility Truly conformal material (pin-hole free at 25 nm thickness) Thin film dielectric Excellent moisture/chemical barrier properties High mechanical strength Substrate Heat

40 Northeastern University Dry Etching – Ion Beam Milling Vecco MicroEtch 10 ” Ion Beam Milling System Acc. Voltage 1kV Shutter Current ~1Amp

41 Northeastern University XACTIX e1™ Series XeF 2 Silicon Etch System The e1 uses XeF 2 as the etching gas. Xenon difluoride exhibits a high selectivity to silicon versus many materials. Xenon Difluoride Advantages Selectivity during etching XeF 2 shows very high selectivity vs silicon to the majority of semiconductor materials including photoresist, silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum. Typically the selectivity of silicon nitride is better than 100:1 and the selectivity to silicon dioxide is better than 1000:1. No release stiction XeF 2 etching is a dry process so no drying is needed which avoids the sticking issues that often plague wet release processes. Delicate structures are safely released Since XeF 2 etching is a dry, room temperature process delicate structures can be released. This is particularly useful for releasing delicate devices, such as micromirrors, that are best released after dicing and wire bonding.

42 Northeastern University Oxford Instruments Plasma Pro 100 ICP Etch System Load Locked ICP etch system (inductively coupled plasma) –ICP source produces a high density of reactive species at low pressure. Substrate bias controlled by separate RF source, allowing independent control of ion energy Uses CL 2 and BCL 3 etch gases Back Side Helium cooling Up to 6” capability RF1 RF2

43 Northeastern University Dry Etching – ICP ICP Plasma Therm 790 Available Gases: SF 6, Ar, O 2 Chemical Gas Substrate Patterned Resist RF Field 1 RF Field 2

44 Northeastern University Anatech SP-100 Asher Used for removal of PR,PMMA Plasma de-scum post development prior to deposition Low temp inductively coupled plasma

45 Northeastern University CMP G&P Poli -400/500 CMP System

46 Northeastern University Cleaning – Wet Benches H 2 O 2 /H 2 SO 4 (1:2) Removal of some metals & Organic materials H 2 O/H 2 O 2 /H 2 SO 4 (1:1:6) Removal of metals HF/H 2 O (1:50) Removal of Oxide layer

47 Northeastern University Cleaning – Ultrasonic   Viscosity   Frequency

48 Northeastern University Cleaning – Megasonic   Viscosity   Frequency

49 Northeastern University Glove Box Innovative Technology Inc. – Single glove box with Spinner and hot plate – N 2 /Ar atmosphere – 1 ppm O 2 background – PLC controlled

50 Northeastern University Wafer Dicing MicroAutomation 1006A Dicing Saw Dicing of semiconductor wafers Silicon or glass Up to 6” capability

51 Northeastern University User Training And Access

52 Northeastern University User Training And Access Industrial Users/Partners Access is available to all NEU PI’s and Students Equipment is booked and accessed online –www.kostas.neu.eduwww.kostas.neu.edu Online site contains –scheduler –Training materials,manuals, videos –Process data –Web cams to monitor usage –Equipment statues Facility is open 24 /7 to NEU users Outside users can access site M-F 8:00-5:30 pm –Outside/Industrial user fees are posted online –Can work alone or partner with a professor –Facility access and hands on training is proved after MOU and safety training completed

53 Northeastern University Equipment Donations The Center obtains most of its Equipment from Faculty Faculty give over equipment to be housed in center in exchange for – One quarter free usage for all PI’s students – Center accepts responsibility for all upkeep and maintenance and training – Equipment must appeal to broad array of users not PI specific Broad usage level enables ability to maintain equipment We also accept industrial donations through partnerships to use the center as a marketing /training site – Broad appeal to center users must apply

54 Northeastern University Kostas Center: Recent Equipment Donations Jobin Hyvon: LabRam 800 :Raman Spectroscopy Janus Research: Cryogenic Probe Station Astex Cirrus 300 ECR PECVD Deposition Tool Oxford Research : ICP Metal Etch Tool Xactix : XeF 2 Silicon Etch Tool Innovative Technology Inc: Glove Box Thermal Evaporator Zeiss : FIB Park Scientific : NX10 AFM (industrial Donation) Tousimis Critical point drier

55 Northeastern University Summary  Established through Mr. George J. Kostas '43 generous gift, The facility was completed in January  The George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center is the primary facility for micro and nanofabrication at Northeastern University.  This core facility consist of more than 5000 square feet of class 10, 1000, and cleanroom space and a state of the art set of tools for nano and mico manufacturing.  The facility is open to faculty, students, researchers, coop students, on a user fee basis  Contact us to learn how you can access this facility for your research and start using the fabrication and/or characterization capabilities.


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