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Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 1 MODULE 4 Standards-Based Grading & Reporting.

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Presentation on theme: "Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 1 MODULE 4 Standards-Based Grading & Reporting."— Presentation transcript:

1 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 1 MODULE 4 Standards-Based Grading & Reporting

2 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 2 HUT Activity #1: “If a process for implementing standards is not in place, then…” #2: “If standards-based assessment is not in place, then…” #3: “If standards-based instruction is not in place, then…” #4: “If effective leadership and continued professional development are not in place, then…” #5: Observe for now

3 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 3 “If all of the above are not in place, then standards- based grading…”

4 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 4 Standards Implementation Planning Model 3.Determine learning experiences that will enable students to learn what they need to know and to do. 1. Identify relevant standards. 4. Teach and collect evidence of student learning. 6. Evaluate student work and make judgment on learning results and communicate findings. 2. Determine acceptable evidence and criteria. Involve students throughout the process 5.Assess student work to inform instruction or use data to provide feedback. collect evidence of student learning.

5 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 5 Purpose of this Module To provide a framework and tools for moving from traditional to standards-based grading and reporting.

6 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 6 Outcomes 1.Participants will critically examine their own grading practices, understand the complexity of grading, dialogue and make decisions at the school level about grading in a standards-based system. 2.Participants will have guidelines for determining grades that are meaningful, consistent and that support learning. 3.Participants will have models for collecting, documenting, recording, and reporting evidence. 4.Participants will know how to involve students in the process.

7 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 7 Key Concepts Grading is complex and needs to be critically examined and aligned with standards-based instruction and assessment. The practices for determining standards-based grades are different from those in a traditional grading system. Guidelines for grading should be established to create meaningful, consistent, fair, and accurate grades for students. Involvement of students enhances learning, motivates students, and keeps them apprised of their own growth and progress.

8 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Day Agenda  DAY 1  Welcome & Introductions  Part I: Hawaii’s Standards-Based Report Card Implementation & Timelines  PART II: Grading Issues, Practices, Purpose, & Assumptions  PART III: Guidelines for Grading  Process and Planning Time, Homework  DAY 2  PART III: Guidelines for Grading (continued)  PART IV: Determining Proficiency  PART V: Focus on Special Needs  PART VI: Developing a Grade Book Using Guidelines  Process and Planning Time

9 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 9 As a complex area support staff: You will be working with teachers who are concerned about: –The new standards-based report card –What does it look like? When do I use it? –Why are we changing? –What does this mean to me?

10 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 10 Hawaii DOE’s Efforts Standards-Based Grading & Reporting

11 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 11 Let’s focus on function first… BOE website (lilinote.k12.hi.us/STATE/BOE/HomePage.nsf/) go to Document Library, then BOE Policies 2400 SERIES-ORGANIZATIONS 2406Middle Level Education 2407High School Education 2408Adult Education 2409Content Standards for Adult Community Schools 4500 SERIES-STUDENT PERFORMANCE AND ACHIEVEMENT 4500Student Promotion 4501Assessing/Grading Student Performance 4502Middle Level Education Promotion 4510Reporting Student Progress 4520Academic Requirements for Participation in Co-Curricular Activities 4530Credits 4540Graduation and Related

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17 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 17 Title: High School Education Series : 2400 SERIES-ORGANIZATIONS Statute #: 2407 cont. Vision of a Hawaii Public School Graduate: All Hawaii public school graduates will: ·Realize their individual goals and aspirations ·Possess the attitudes, knowledge and skills necessary to contribute positively and compete in a global society ·Exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship ·Pursue post-secondary education and/or careers without the need for remediation. The Department of Education shall provide relevant support to high schools as they develop and implement their school-wide comprehensive plan that includes but is not limited to: ·Personalization of the high school experience ·Clear expectations that promote rigorous and relevant learning opportunities ·Effective organization of time ·Integration of technology throughout the curriculum ·Professional development that facilitates and supports new roles and responsibilities through teaming ·Strong leadership from all levels of the school community and educational system ·Authentic and effective partnerships with post-secondary institutions, community agencies and businesses. These criteria shall be incorporated and addressed through the Standards Implementation Design Plan and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) accreditation process. Approved: 10/16/03

18 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 18 Other Initiatives Hawaii Content & Performance Standards (HCPS) –Essential standards (Fall 2004) –Proficiency level descriptors (draft for pilot schools 2004) –Refined standards (2005) –ACCN Laser ( ) Course Outlines (2005) New grad requirements ( ) Graduation Requirements –BOE Approved = 2004 –Effective Class of 2010 –2006 = “D” no longer counts for credit

19 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 19 Implementation Timeline Elementary Paper/Pencil Pilot (10 schools) All elementary schools, rate GLOs Training Year for Standards-Based Grading for all schools Elementary Electronic Pilot (10 schools) 2 Secondary Electronic Pilots use eSIS for master scheduling Standards-Based Grading for ALL elementary schools Elementary Statewide Implementation, Phase I 2 Secondary Electronic Pilot of Standards-Based Report Card Elementary Statewide Implementation, Phase II, electronic RC Secondary Statewide Implementation, Phase I, electronic RC Secondary Statewide Implementation, Phase II, electronic RC For more information, send to:

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22 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 22 Grading Scale for Pilot Report Card Status Report (per Reg ) Content Areas: E = Demonstrates exceptional academic performance; an in-depth understanding or exemplary display of HCPS M = Meets Proficiency, All standards S = Meets Proficiency, Majority of Standards (new) N = Demonstrates developing academic performance that almost meets standards; evolving understanding or display of HCPS. U =Demonstrates unsatisfactory academic performance; little or no understanding or display of HCPS. NA = Not Applicable at this time SC = See comment General Learner Outcomes: 4 = Consistently Demonstrates 3 = Usually Demonstrates 2 = Sometimes Demonstrates 1 = Rarely Demonstrates

23 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 23 Draft Secondary Status Report Student Performance The judgments and comments in this report are based on information gathered over time and from a variety of sources. The student’s achievement is determined from a variety of assessments that include teacher observations, class work, tests, projects and activities. Status Report 1 (for Semester/Term 1 courses) are not averages of the reporting periods. Each is an evaluation of the student’s cumulative, semester-end or year-end achievement of the standards. The quality of performance, or how well the student is achieving the Hawaii Content and Performance Standards, is reported by the following grading scales: Grade Scale for Courses (Based on Standards) Descriptor Guidelines AExceedsExceeds standards: Performance proficiencyconsistently exceeds standards. BMeets proficiency,Meets standards; Performance all standardsis consistently at standards. CMeets proficiency Meets standards; Performance is majority of standardsconsistently at standards. DApproaches proficiencyShows progress towards standards FWell below proficiencyDoes not yet meet standards. NNot applicable at this time or incomplete

24 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 24 Hawaii DOE Standards-Based Report Card Elementary Pilot Schools: Haaheo - Hawaii Haiku - Maui Iroquois Point - Leeward Kalaheo - Kauai Maili - Leeward Maunawili - Windward Mililani-Ike - Central Mt. View - Hawaii Alvah Scott - Central Wilson - Honolulu Secondary Pilot Schools: Kahuku High & Intermediate Waianae Intermediate

25 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 25 Pilot Forms p.1 & 2

26 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 26 Pilot Forms p.3 & 4

27 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 27 eSIS system, report card - pilot

28 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 28 GLO Rating Attachment for Report Card

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30 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 30 Activity What are some issues teachers face with grading? What are some issues teachers face with grading? On your own, brainstorm issues a teacher faces when giving grades. Share them with your group. Cluster issues that seem to be related. Give each cluster a label. What are some of your labels?

31 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 31 What are some underlying perspectives on grading? Grading: Is not essential for learning Is complicated Is subjective and emotional Is inescapable Has a limited research base Has no single best practice If faulty, can damage students--and teachers

32 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 32 Where do teachers get their grading practices? The policies and practices they experienced as students Their personal philosophies of teaching and learning State, district, department, or grade level policies on grading and reporting Their undergraduate teacher preparation programs

33 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 33 What do parents most want to know about their child’s teacher? That the teacher is competent That the teacher cares about their child as an individual

34 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 34 Why must we change the way we grade students? The growing emphasis on standards and performance assessments makes current reporting practices inadequate. Parents and community members are demanding more and better information about student progress in learning. Advances in technology allow more efficient reporting of detailed information on student learning. Grading and reporting are recognized as one of educators’ most important responsibilities. There is growing awareness of the gap between our knowledge base and common practice in grading and reporting.

35 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 35 What are the qualities that determine good evidence in grading and reporting? Validity: the appropriateness & adequacy of interpretations Reliability: the consistency of assessment results Quantity: multiple sources for instructional and grading purposes

36 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 36 What are the major purposes for grading and reporting? To communicate the achievement status of students to parents and others To provide information that students can use for self-evaluation To select, identify, or group students for certain educational paths or programs To provide incentives for students to learn To evaluate the effectiveness of instructional programs To provide evidence of students’ effort or responsibility

37 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 37 What must we keep in mind as we grade and report student learning? The primary goal of grading and reporting is communication. Grading and reporting are integral parts of the instructional process. Good reporting is based on good evidence. Changes in grading and reporting are best accomplished through the development of a comprehensive reporting system.

38 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 38 Two Ways to Assess Human Performance

39 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 39 What’s the Difference? Standards are: Fixed Cooperative Measuring proficiency Challenging Complicated Addressing causes Norms are: Moveable Competitive Measure speed Dumbed down Simple Display effects

40 6/30/04 40

41 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 41 Sample Grade Book Look at sample grade book. What do you notice? What questions do you have?

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43 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 43 What are the eight guidelines for grading? 1.Basis for grading - Relate grading procedures to Hawaii Content and Performance Standards II and the General Learner Outcomes. 2.Reference Points - Use the Grade Level Performance Indicators and Grading Scale to determine grades. 3.Ingredients - Grades should be based on individual achievement. 4.Sources of Information - Not everything needs to be included in grades. 5.Changing Grades - Update grades periodically based on more recent learning; look at the preponderance of evidence. 6.Number Crunching - Don’t average. 7.Quality - Use quality assessment(s) and properly recorded evidence of learning. 8.Student Understanding - Involve students in the assessment process. Adapted by TDS with permission from Ken O’Connor.

44 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 44 Guideline 1: Basis for Grades Relate grading procedures to Hawaii Content and Performance Standards II and the General Learner Outcomes.

45 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Basis for Grading Relate grading procedures to Hawaii Content and Performance Standards II and the General Learner Outcomes.

46 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 46 What do teachers base grades on?

47 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 47 Mr. Fisher, a new social studies teacher, found the curriculum difficult to understand, so he trusted that what needed to be taught was likely in the teacher’s manual and the textbook. During the course of the year, he spent time on engrossing activities that arose from the text, like tracing family trees in Hawaii. Unfortunately, these activities were time consuming. Mr. Fisher found that he didn’t have enough time to cover the three remaining topics and review with his students before the final test. Consequently, his students did not do well on the comprehensive multiple-choice tests used as a final exam. Their grades, initially high because of their quality work on the activities designed by Mr. Fisher, were dragged down by their grades on the final exam. When asked by one father how marks were determined (The comment, “The exam lowered the mark,” appeared on this child’s final report card.), what content was supposed to be covered, and why students had spent so much time on project work, Mr. Fisher had difficulty defending his choices. Case Study 1:

48 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 48 Think and Discuss Can Mr. Fisher draw a straight arrow between his target and his grade? Why or why not? TARGETGRADE

49 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 49 Key Point In a standards-based system, the basis should be the standards. There needs to be a direct link from the learning target (whether they be the standards, the benchmarks or the performance indicators) to the grade. TARGETGRADE

50 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 50 What are the key concepts?  Grades need to be directly linked to the targets: standards, benchmarks or performance indicators. This must be done first and not as an afterthought.  Students and teachers--and parents--need to have a clear idea of the “target” or learning goal. They all need to know what is expected.  The report card should provide information on the mastery of the target or learning goal.

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54 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 54 SAMPLE: English Language Arts Grade Book (gr. 8)

55 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Reference Points Use the Grade Level Performance Indicators and grading scale to determine grades.

56 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 56 Grading Scale for Pilot Report Card Status Report Content Areas: E = Demonstrates exceptional academic performance; an in-depth understanding or exemplary display of HCPS M = Meets Proficiency, All standards S = Meets Proficiency, Majority of Standards (new) N = Demonstrates developing academic performance that almost meets standards; evolving understanding or display of HCPS. U =Demonstrates unsatisfactory academic performance; little or no understanding or display of HCPS. NA = Not Applicable at this time SC = See comment General Learner Outcomes: 4 = Consistently Demonstrates 3 = Usually Demonstrates 2 = Sometimes Demonstrates 1 = Rarely Demonstrates

57 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 57 By demonstrating mastery of the Kindergarten-LA GLPIs, the student provides evidence for: the standard the strand the content area Considerations

58 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 58 K Writing GLPI The student: Expresses ideas and feelings with pictures, scribbling, and “words” Uses details added to picture, scribbling, or “words.” Shows a sense of organization (balance on page through use of white space; proportion and sizing of pictures; drawings put in order; coordination of pictures and text) Shows expressiveness and emotion (e.g., in color, shape, choice of images, choice of labels, choice of topic).

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61 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 61 “My Journal” entry – 12/03, Randi (K)

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63 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 63 A A B B

64 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 64 Class List Student 1 Student 2 Student 3 Student 4 Student 5 Oral Comm., Etc.

65 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Ingredients Grades should be based on individual achievement. Separate effort, participation, attitude, attendance, and behavior from the academic achievement. Separate GLOs. Use individual achievement evidence, not group grades.

66 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 66 Rate your belief Achievement should be the primary factor for grading. Effort, behavior, and attendance should be factors for grading. Group grades for participation in collaborative learning groups should be a factor for grading.

67 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 67 Grade Ingredients:

68 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 68 Grade Ingredients: PIndividual Achievement Instructions: 1.Separate effort, participation, attitude, attendance and behavior from the academic achievement. 2.Separate GLO’s and use individual achievement evidence and not group grades. O’Connor, K., (2002). How to Grade for Learning: Linking Grades to Standards, 2nd Edition. Pearson Professional Development ©. Glenview, IL

69 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 69 What about… Effort Behavior Attitude Attendance General Learner Outcomes 1.Self Directed Learner 2.Community Contributor 3.Complex Thinker 4.Quality Producer 5.Effective Communicator 6.Effective and Ethical User of Technology

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71 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 71 Grade the Individual Grades should not include group scores; what goes into the grade should reflect the learning of each individual. Grading Individual vs. Group

72 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 72 Kagan’s 7 Reasons for Opposing Group Grades 1.No(t) fair 2.Debase report cards 3.Undermine motivation 4.Convey the wrong measure 5.Violate individual accountability 6.Are responsible for resistance to cooperative learning 7.May be challenged in court NO GROUP GRADES Kagan, S. (1995). Group Grades Miss the Mark. Educational Leadership. 68 – 71.

73 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 73 Grading Standards-BasedTraditional Achievement OnlyUncertain mix of achievement, attitude, effort and behavior IndividualOften includes group marks

74 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 74 It is NOT uniformity. It IS equity of opportunity. –The more consistent the performance, the less evidence needed. –The less consistent the performance, the more evidence needed. Fairness

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76 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 76 What About the General Learner Outcomes? How do we begin?

77 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 77 Self Directed Learner = the ability to be responsible for ones’ own learning Community Contributor = the understanding that it is essential for human beings to work together Complex Thinker = the ability to demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving strategies Quality Producer = the ability to recognize and produce quality performances and quality products Effective Communicator= the ability to communicate effectively Effective and Ethical User of Technology= the ability to use a variety of technologies effectively and ethically The General Learner Outcomes

78 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 78 We are not “grading” GLOs Providing a rating as part of the communication system to parents and students Providing data towards our “Vision of the High School Graduate” Providing a picture of the “whole child” and not just the academic achievement

79 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 79 GLO Rating Scale General Learner Outcomes: 4 = Consistently Demonstrates 3 = Usually Demonstrates 2 = Sometimes Demonstrates 1 = Rarely Demonstrates

80 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 80 GLO Rating Attachment for Report Card

81 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 81 The eight guidelines can be adapted to fit the GLOs: 1.Basis for grading - Relate rating procedures to the General Learner Outcomes 2.Reference Points - Use the rubrics as well as professional judgment about what is developmentally appropriate 3.Ingredients - Ratings cut across content areas 4.Sources of Information - Use information from student products, communications and observation 5.Changing Grades - Consider preponderance of evidence 6.Number Crunching - Rating is based on frequency and consistency 7.Quality - Use quality assessment(s) and properly recorded evidence of learning. 8.Student Understanding - Involve students in the assessment process.

82 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 82 Think of assessment methods GLOs Mastery of Understanding Applied Understandings Growth over Time

83 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 83 Choose one of the GLOs List the behaviors that you would see that would indicate the students were demonstrating that behavior. List the things you would hear students saying if they were demonstrating that behavior.

84 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 84 Let’s get concrete … What does it look like?What does it look like? What does it sound like?What does it sound like?

85 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 85 Planning to collect evidence… GLOs Check listsPerformanceInterviewAnecdotalJournalPortfolioOther Self Directed Learner Community Contributor Complex Thinker Quality Producer Effective Communicator Effective & Ethical User of Technology

86 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 86 Planning for Success Embedded- how can I gather evidence from on-going instructional activities? On demand- what task can I design so students can demonstrate their understanding and application of the behavior?

87 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 87 Embedded As part of our social studies unit, prepare and deliver a five minute presentation with PowerPoint slides on one of the issues facing our island state in regards to dwindling natural resources. Cite at least 3 primary sources and 3 electronic sources. Your presentation must highlight the problem, recommended solutions and your “call to action.”

88 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 88 On demand Is it important for people to give back to their community? Justify you answer with a rationale that would convince your peers. Provide specific examples and research from at least 3 different sources.

89 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 89 Student Self-Assessment GLO: Complex Thinker (List the behaviors you would see or hear) OftenSome- times Not Yet

90 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 90 How am I doing? We cannot expect students to do anything we ourselves do not do. How self-directed was I in my learning today? How did I contribute to the community of learners at this workshop? How did I engage in complex thinking? What quality product did I create? How effective was my communication? How did I use technology effectively and ethically?

91 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 91 What evidence is there of my learning?

92 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Sources of Information Not everything needs to be included in grades.

93 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 93 Sampling Question- How much? Do you have sufficient information to make confident decisions and to take action?

94 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 94 “My Journal” entry – 12/03, Randi (K)

95 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 95 Reason for the assessment Scope of the target Coverage of one exercise Time available Consistency of performance Proximity of the standard Sampling Considerations

96 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 96 Practice & Mistakes In sports and other activities, practice is important and is in preparation for the game. Marking everything a student does in the classroom contradicts the value of practice. Practice in the form of worksheets, homework and quizzes will lead to better performance even if they do not have grades attached. Practice the type of assessment that is to be used summatively.

97 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/04 97 Lighten the Load Marking everything is not necessary Check work regularly without ALWAYS providing marks. –Record work as “done” or “not done” –Drafts can be skimmed for overall impression –Focus in on one or two key characteristics for feedback –Utilize peer and self-assessment practices

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99 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Changing Grades Update grades periodically based on more recent learning; look at the preponderance of evidence. “By grading in pencil, it allows for ease in changing/updating grades.” O’Connor, p. 135

100 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ If students demonstrate achievement at any time that, in effect, renders past assessment information inaccurate, then you must drop the former assessment from the record and replace it with the new. To do otherwise is to misrepresent that achievement. Stiggins, 2001

101 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Learning is an ongoing process and what matters is how much learning occurs, not when it occurs. We need to honor that students learn at different rates and should not be penalized for early learning. Time is a variable and we need to provide flexible learning time for students. We must offer students varied assessment opportunities to support learning and encourage student success.

102 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ What if there is inconsistent evidence? Give priority to evidence related to the most important learning goals or expectations. Give priority or weight to the most comprehensive form of evidence. Give priority to more recent learning.

103 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ What do we mean by preponderance?

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106 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ PROCESS TIME Summarize what you learned about the 5 guidelines. Relate to the issues generated earlier.

107 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Learning Log Compare and contrast traditional vs. standards-based grading. Reflect where your schools (you service) are. Reflect on where you need to strengthen your own skills in working with teachers. Any new insights?

108 Standards Based Grading and Reporting OCISS 6/30/ Homework  Design a page of a grade book based on the first five guidelines.  Specify grade level, content area and standards.


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