Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June 2009 1 Website:

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June 2009 1 Website:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Website: Jaafar Jantan a.k.a. DR. JJ (Assoc. Prof. Dr.) Faculty of Applied Sciences, UiTM, Shah Alam Featured Talk for the International Conference on Thinking; KLCC Convention Center, June 25th, 2009 “The principle goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done -- men who are creative, inventive and discoverers. “ Jean Piaget “The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.” Carl Rogers “Teachers are powerful people and keepers of the future. Help your students dream big!” Leslie Owen Wilson

2 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

3 3

4 4

5 5 develop individuals who have advanced literacy skills in their discipline rigour and creativity to new insights and knowledge rhetorically versatile, confident communicators able to adapt and contribute to the demands of employment and life in a changing society and wider world One of the most important goals of a university is to develop individuals who have advanced literacy skills in their discipline : people who can participate effectively by critiquing information and ideas and by contributing with rigour and creativity to new insights and knowledge, who are self-aware as learners, and who are rhetorically versatile, confident communicators able to adapt and contribute to the demands of employment and life in a changing society and wider world.

6 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Sternberg, R. & Subotnik, R., eds. (2006). Optimizing Student Success with the Other Three Rs: Reasoning, Resilience, and Responsibility. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. Sternberg suggests Curriculum must develop the other 3 R’s. ReasoningReasoning which include analytical, critical thinking, and problem solving skills ResilienceResilience which encompasses life skills such as flexibility, adaptability, and self-reliance ResponsibilityResponsibility wisdom, which he defines as “the application of intelligence, creativity, and knowledge for a common good.”

7 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Wagner, T., Kegan, R., Lahey, L., Lemons, R., Garnier, J., Helsing, D., Howell, A., Rasmussen, H. (2006). Change Leadership: A Practical Guide to Transforming Our Schools. San Francisco: Jossey Bass. Wagner et. al suggests Curriculum must develop the other 3 R’s. RigorRigor What students are able to do as a result of their learning. RelevanceRelevance helping students understand how their learning connects to their further studies and future work settings. ResponsibilityResponsibility Promoting respectful relationships between and among teachers and students that foster academic and social competence.

8 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Tucker, M.S. & Codding, J.B. (2002/1998). thinking curriculum Marc Tucker and Judy Codding urges adoption of thinking curriculum deep understanding of the subject ability to apply that understanding to the complex, real-world problems that the student will face as an adult that provides a deep understanding of the subject and the ability to apply that understanding to the complex, real-world problems that the student will face as an adult

9 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design; Chap 4. Can explain Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data. Can interpret Can interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models. Can apply Can apply: effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts. Have perspective Have perspective: see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; see the big picture.

10 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design; Chap 4. Can empathize Can empathize: find value in what others might find odd, alien, or implausible; perceive sensitively on the basis of prior direct experience. Have self-knowledge Have self-knowledge: perceive the personal style, prejudices, projections, and habits of mind that both shape and impede our own understanding; we are aware of what we do not understand and why understanding is so hard

11 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

12 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June The 3 Domains of Educational Goals Psychomotor Doing, The Hand, Body Affective Feeling, The Heart Cognitive Knowing, the Head 3H

13 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

14 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

15 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June "teaching is undertaking certain ethical tasks or activities the intention of which is to induce learning" art of deliveringAn art of delivering info & processing of shared info transferringA process of transferring knowledge from teacher to students ConveyingConveying knowledge in systematic way Process of educating (an individual) another person n motivate to learn DeliveryDelivery of knowledge TEACHING IS

16 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Mirror showing self n path of choices Person or equipment that conduct the teaching. Person or equipment having knowledge Person who is knowledgeable, good listener and a motivator to ensure knowledge is fully received by students n to develop positive attitudes to students Mentor, educator, expert, actor, performer, role-model, friends, evaluatorMentor, educator, expert, actor, performer, role-model, friends, evaluator Tool that delivers knowledge thru effective communication TEACHER IS

17 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June students think and learn in many different ways “... the theory validates educators' everyday experience: students think and learn in many different ways. Linguistic intelligence Logical-mathematical intelligence Musical intelligence Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence Spatial intelligence Interpersonal intelligence Intrapersonal intelligence Naturalists ….. Existential…..

18 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Coding Devices: COLOR SHAPE MAPS IMAGINATION DAYDREAM RYTHM Skills: Analyse Lines Language List Logic Numbers Words

19 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

20 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Key Memory Systems & How they Interact Buffering Storage Media RAM

21 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Key Memory Systems & How they Interact Long Term Memory Minutes to Lifetime Recall Rote & Meaningful Learning Continuum Short term or Working Memory 1-30 secs Duration Limited to 7+2 independent chunks ACTIVITY: READ & REMEMBER THE NUMBER

22 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June At the end of this activity students will be able to: Draw the electric force exerted by one point charge onto another and describe the motion of charges in the presence of other point charges.

23 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June At the end of this activity students will be able to: Describe and draw the electric field patterns created by point charges surrounding a point charge.

24 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Using the the Electric Field Hockey PHET simulation and choose the hockey putt be the negatively charged particle feeling the force, move a negative charge near it to “see” the force exerted on the putt. Then draw the force diagram based on your observation. Using a ruler, measure the length of each force line. Now compare the force diagram for each of the electrons to your predicted diagram. How different are they? Explain the similarity and differences you observed in terms of the direction and length of the force line. LAB

25 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

26 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

27 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

28 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Reflection “The goal of intellectual education is not how to repeat or retain ready-made truths…. It is in learning to master the truth by oneself at the risk of losing a lot of time and going thru all the roundabout ways that are inherent in real activity.” (Jean Piaget, Swiss cognitive psychologist, )

29 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

30 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Instrument: CSEM – Q7 Bef:61%, Aft:37% Bef:9%, Aft:10% Bef:15%, Aft:23% Bef:9%, Aft:13% Bef:6%, Aft:17% CRI=2,3

31 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June Instrument: CSEM – Q8 (a) 9%, After:7% (b) 18%, After:17% (c) 21%, After:17% (d) 41%, After:37% (e) 12%, After:23% CRI=1,3

32 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June N=33 N=16

33 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June N=79

34 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

35 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

36 What is a Concept Map??

37

38 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June What is a Concept Map?? Concept mapping The arrow describes the direction of the relationship and reads like a normal sentenceA concept map is a special form of a web diagram for exploring knowledge and gathering and sharing information. Concept mapping is the strategy employed to develop a concept map. A concept map consists of nodes or cells that contain a concept, item or question and links. The links are labeled and denote direction with an arrow head. The labeled links explain the relationship between the nodes. The arrow describes the direction of the relationship and reads like a normal sentence.

39 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

40 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

41 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

42 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

43 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June

44 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP  What is a force?? Concept Maps Examples  Push, pull, frictional  Touch, at-a-distance  Gravitational, magnetic, electrical  field  Velocity, position, position change, clock reading  Newton’s Laws, motion  Newton, meter, seconds, radians  Charge, mass, radius, length, time interval  Acceleration, linear, angular  Inertia, moment of inertia, torque FORCE

45 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP Ripples, Water Boats Interference Frequency Sound amplitude, Party A Wave is Wave CMAP Wave Concepts

46 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP  to assess understanding or diagnose misunderstanding  to communicate complex ideas  to generate ideas (brain storming, etc.); Why do Concept Maps  to design a complex structure (long texts, hypermedia, large web sites, etc.);  to organize material

47 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP  to integrate large body of materials  to insert new concepts within existing knowledge structure  to fix learned materials into long-term memory Why do Concept Maps  to revise effectively for examinations

48 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP  Identify segment of text or lab activity or a particular problem or question that you are trying to understand. How To Do Concept Maps  Begin with domain of knowledge that is familiar  Identify key concepts in this domain by listing them. Identify key concepts in this domain by listing them.

49 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP  Approximately, rank order the concepts from most general most inclusive to most specific least general concept How To Do Concept Maps  Construct a preliminary concept map. Best done by writing concepts on sticker notes for ease of moving it around during building the hierarchy.  Revise the map - more than 3X A Wave is Wave CMAP Wave Concepts

50 Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June CMAP  Find the cross-links (concepts linked across domains) How To Do Concept Maps  Add domains and more cross-links every time new knowledge is learned.

51 Copyright DR JJ, ASERG, UiTM, Shah Alam 51 You do not learn much just sitting in classes listening to teachers, memorizing prepackaged assignments, and spitting out answers. You must talk about what you are learning, write reflectively about it, relate it to past experiences, and apply it to your daily lives. You must make what you learn part of yourselves.” -Source:"Implementing the Seven Principles: Technology as Lever" by Arthur W. Chickering and Stephen C. Ehrmann “Learning is not a spectator sport. Traditional Learning Lecture-Lab-Tutorial


Download ppt "Copyright DrJJ, ASERG, FSG UiTM, June 2009 1 Website:"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google