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Engaging Student Learners

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Presentation on theme: "Engaging Student Learners"— Presentation transcript:

1 Engaging Student Learners

2 Handouts Critical Design Qualities of Student Work
Student Engagement Graphic Organizer Minds on Fire (Kathleen Cushman) Student Survey (Grant Wiggins) Growth Guides and Growth Guide Organizer Practice Profile, Fidelity Checklist, Action Plan Hide this slide prior to training.

3 Purpose and Content Learning Objective: Expectations for the training:
Learn to recognize, plan, and apply high student engagement practices, strategies, and techniques for all learning, regardless of grade level or content area. Expectations for the training: Participants will be able to observe and describe the learning conditions that promote engagement. Participants will be able to select and incorporate effective unit and lesson design qualities.

4 Engaging Student Learners
Effect Size and Connection to Missouri Teaching Standards

5

6 Will come from extension from previous slide

7 Hattie Effect Size Hold

8 Connection to Missouri Teaching Standards
Standard 1, Quality Indicator 2: Engaging Students in Subject Matter Standard 4, Quality Indicator 1: Instructional Strategies Leading to Student Engagement in Problem Solving and Critical Thinking Standard 4, Quality Indicator 2: Appropriate Use of Instructional Resources to Enhance Student Learning Standard 5, Quality Indicator 1: Classroom Management, Motivation, and Engagement Teacher standards:

9 Opening & Introductions
Purpose: Provide an overview of the day, including reviewing learner objectives, outcomes, and essential questions Content: Session at-a-glance; Introductions; Essential questions; Norms; Pre-assessment

10 Session-at-a-Glance Definition and Clarification of Student Engagement Practice Hattie Effect Size Identifying the qualities and conditions of engagement Application of qualities of engagement to a lesson Self-Assessment and Reflection Summarize and Organize The module is short; easily a half day with flexible activities. Engagement can be viewed through many different lenses; rather than trying to address cognitive, behavioral, and affective aspects too broadly and without depth, this module focuses on instruction, in keeping with Hattie’s Visible Learning. It is segmented into 6 brief sections, which are marked. It should be fairly easy to modify the activities for a narrow audience. (all elementary, all HS, etc.)

11 Norms Begin and end on time. Be an engaged participant.
Be an active listener—open to new ideas. Use notes for sidebar conversations. Use electronics respectfully.

12 Essential Question What does it mean to be a highly engaged student?
Note: The third bullet reflects the terminology used in DESE’s Teacher Growth Guides. In order to be consistent with the terms used by Hattie, Marzano, and Lemov, all three terms will be used throughout the module. Reminder: Engagement can be viewed through many different lenses; rather than trying to address cognitive, behavioral, and affective aspects too broadly, this module focuses on instruction.

13 Guiding Questions What are some components of high student engagement?
What actions, practices, strategies, and techniques promote high engagement for all learners? How do I assess my lessons and units for engaging qualities? Note: The third bullet reflects the terminology used in DESE’s Teacher Growth Guides. In order to be consistent with the terms used by Hattie, Marzano, and Lemov, all three terms will be used throughout the module. Reminder: Engagement can be viewed through many different lenses; rather than trying to address cognitive, behavioral, and affective aspects too broadly, this module focuses on instruction.

14 Purpose and Content Purpose: Learn to plan and apply high student engagement strategies for all learning, regardless of grade level or content area. Content: Session at-a-glance; Introductions; Guiding questions; Norms; Pre-assessment, Planning for engagement, Implementing high engagement strategies, and reflecting on engagement strategies used. Hidden slide

15 Part One: Clarify the Terms “Motivation” and “Engagement”
Purpose: Review the basics and relevance to student learning Content:

16 Thinking About Engagement
Create teams of 3 or 4, or table teams. On a sticky note, answer the following questions solo: Who was your favorite teacher? Why was s/he your favorite? As a team, share your findings and note: What characteristics do your favorites have in common? Each team will share with the larger group. The facilitator makes a list of all of the characteristics generated by the groups and asks participants to explain their choices. Usually items such as “relevant,” “did lots of activities,” “hands-on learning,” “cared about me” or “something I could apply” are given. Some may remark that they were “motivated” to learn in that classroom. Make the point that these characteristics are ones that we appreciate, and that many of us try to emulate. You may be remembering this teacher after many years! Post the list…those words will resurface through the upcoming work.

17 Motivation and Engagement
We often hear people say, “This student is not engaged in the classroom. S/he is just not motivated.” These terms used interchangeably, but the definitions are NOT the same. Our goal is to create units and lessons that contain engaging qualities, thus motivating our students. You observed this in the last activity. How do they differ and what do they have to do with high levels of student engagement? (rhetorical)

18 Definition of Motivation
Researchers who have struggled with questions of what motivates students generally recognize two major types of motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation is the desire to do or achieve something because one truly wants to and takes pleasure or sees value in doing so. Extrinsic motivation is the desire to do or achieve something not for the enjoyment of the thing itself, but because doing so leads to a certain result. Quote from Pintrich. Ask participants to read silently. Most are familiar with the two types of motivation. The quote is meant to provide some background for the next slides. Pintrich, 2003

19 Trying a “Rewards System” to Motivate Students
“Teachers and parents alike have tried some system. Pizza parties, charts with stars, candy, ribbons… While there may be an initial increase in desired behavior, in most cases, these attempts to buy performance don’t last long.” Steve Gardiner from ”Stop the pay, stop the play” kappanmagazine.org V95 NB 39 Presenters: Although Steve Gardiner feels external reinforcement is not useful, there is a deep research base that supports the use, especially as a teaching strategy for students who need support to navigate appropriate social behaviors in schools. If the discussion comes-up during vetting, perhaps someone who has been engaged with PBIS can clarify questions. Steve Gardiner, 2014

20 The Cycle of Rewards “Similar to an addiction, the rewards must get larger and larger in order to get the same result.” “…the only motivation most students get from rewards is the motivation to get more rewards.” Steve Gardiner from ”Stop the pay, stop the play” kappanmagazine.org V95 NB 40 May Steve Gardiner was 2008 Montana Teacher of the Year. Steve Gardiner, 2014

21 They just aren’t motivated.
A mistake we often make in education is to plan the curriculum materials very carefully, arrange all the instructional materials wall to wall, open the doors of the school, and then find to our dismay that they’ve sent us the wrong kids. They just aren’t motivated. Making the point that we don’t “get” motivated students…we must work at doing specific things that increase engagement, thus are motivating.

22 Understanding Motivation: Center of Gravity Summary
Move into teams. Read the assigned section of “Minds on Fire” by Kathleen Cushman. Complete a “Center of Gravity” summary by recording on chart paper to share aloud: The most important paragraph The most important sentence The most important word The connection between motivation and mastery learning Rick Wormeli strategy. Place participants in workable teams. Center of Gravity asks participants to summarize their section of the text by sharing out what they find to be the: Most important paragraph Most important sentence Most important word and record those on chart paper to share with the whole group, along with how they came to those choices. Guiding question: How does Cushman connect motivation to mastery learning? There are several BIG ideas in this piece; hopefully participants will pull out the words Motivation and Engage several times. We want to see that when lessons containing engaging qualities, which we will be learning, students are motivated. Students get a rush. They remember. They want more.

23 Connecting Meanings If “engagement” includes emotional involvement and commitment, reflect on why Cushman suggests “analyzing our instructional practice with motivation in mind” (p. 43, first column) Consider Cushman’s anecdotal evidence. Last page of article…page 43. Take 2-3 minutes to process and discuss. Again, reiterating the importance of the KINDS of things being done in lessons. We look at our practice, not at what motivation students bring with them to school…

24 John Hattie’s Findings
“No manner of school reform will be successful until we first face and resolve the engagement problem– Too many students are ‘physically present but psychologically absent’. Students can be easily confused. Many are bored. Students spend 85% of their time listening to a teacher talking”. Hattie, John. Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement p. 32. Read aloud , note the bullets.

25 To Increase Engagement in Learning, Students Need…
better indicators of success, more challenging material, higher expectations, and more ways to orient toward success in school. Hattie, John. Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement p Paraphrase of the last bullet.

26 Part 2: Defining Engagement

27 Definition of Engagement
In education, student engagement refers to the degree of attention, curiosity, interest, value, and perseverance that students show when they are learning or being taught. This extends to the motivational level and commitment of students to learn, progress, and persist in their learning. Paraphrased; Parsons et al, Philip Schlechty, Schlechty Center. We demonstrate the connection between motivation and engagement.

28 Components of Engagement
The student is attentive; he/she pays attention to and focuses on the tasks associated with the work being done. The student is committed (without the promise of extrinsic rewards or the threat of negative consequence). The student is persistent. He/she sticks to the task even when it presents difficulty. The student finds meaning and value in the tasks of the work. Decomposing the definition. Takes it down to what teachers can see, hear. Phillip C. Schlechty (2011)

29 Engaged students make a “…. psychological investment in learning
Engaged students make a “….psychological investment in learning. They try hard to learn what school offers. They take pride not simply in earning the formal indicators of success (grades), but in understanding the material and incorporating or internalizing it in their lives.” Newman adds to the definition by including the elements of pride and investing for personal reasons. This is certainly distinct from learning for stickers, parties, candy, pizza parties. Fred Newmann 1992

30 Discussion: Research on Engagement
Teachers and students were asked two questions: 1. What kind of work do you find engaging? Work that allowed for creativity, sparked curiosity, provided an opportunity to work with others, and produced a feeling of success. 2. What kind of work do you hate? Work that was repetitive, required no thought, or was forced on them. Discuss: Consider what our favorite teachers did… Strong, Silver, and Robinson (1995) This slide has fly-ins so there is time to consider a response before seeing what research showed. Allow 1 minute to think. Discuss with a shoulder partner and share out. Presenter can check against what participants share. Did our favorite teachers give us much work that we hated?

31 Teachers Can Heighten Student Engagement
What research tell us about student engagement: Engagement is associated with student achievement. Teachers can increase and decrease engagement, depending on classroom environment. There are a variety of ways to evaluate student engagement. Parsons, et al. With this slide, we are leading into what is actionable—what teachers can DO. Parsons, Nuland, Parsons. 2014

32 “Student Engagement is Malleable”
“Student engagement is malleable, and teachers have the ability to design contexts and tasks that encourage or discourage student engagement. Teachers create an engaging environment by fostering cooperation, positiveness, and tasks that are authentic, collaborative, and challenging.” Parsons, et al. Ask participants to read and process; pair-share at tables. Choose a significant word or words to share with the whole group that stood out. Parsons, Nuland, Parsons. 2014

33 “The core business of our schools is to ensure that every student, every day, is provided challenging, interesting, and satisfying work.” Phillip Schlechty This is Schlechty’s mantra. Teachers can deliberately design engaging lessons—teachers can help ensure students are engaged.

34 How do I go about incorporating elements of engagement
How do I go about incorporating elements of engagement? What will a lesson look like? Sound like? Segue slide. Consider what words/definitions were noted when the group discussed student engagement as malleable.

35 Lesson Design Qualities
Phillip Schlechty proposed a Framework for Lesson Design Qualities of Student Work 1. Design Qualities of Context These are required elements 2. Design Qualities of Choice Choose those appropriate for your students and lesson Copyright Schlechty Center. There are two categories--

36 Understanding the Design Qualities
We will examine Schlechty’s design qualities that increase student engagement. The qualities are divided into two groups: Context These are must-haves Choice These are nice-to-haves Prefacing the work to be done with the handout…

37 Schlechty’s Proposed Design Qualities of Context: Must-Haves
Content and Substance Organization and Knowledge Clear and Compelling Product Standards Protection from Adverse Consequences Schlechty Center Breckenridge Ln. Suite 200 Louisville, KY Big-Picture ideas of what the two pieces are…as consultant reads these aloud, relate the Must-Haves to examples that we saw in Cushman’s Minds on Fire article. These were all there.

38 Schlechty’s Design Qualities of Choice: Not All Must be Present
Product Focus Affirmation of Performance Affiliation Novelty and Variety Choice Authenticity Lessons may contain a combination of these. Schlechty Center for Leadership in School Reform, Standard Copyrighted material. These don’t ALL have to be present in lessons/units, but one or more should be. Several of these were notable in the Minds on Fire article…setting smoke on fire! Authentic, novel.

39 Critical Design Qualities Jigsaw
After counting off and creating teams, read and summarize Schlechty’s Critical Design Qualities of Student Work in 9 words or less. Record on a Sticky Note. Be ready to share your summary with the group. Count off participants into workable teams. If your group is small, have a teams read more than one. There are 10 qualities to be read and summarized. After 3-5 minutes, do a Whip Around and share summaries. Work to clarify definitions and understanding. They are straightforward definitions. Handout: Critical Design Qualities of Student Work

40 The Design Qualities Enhance Student Engagement
“Student engagement refers to the degree of attention, curiosity, interest, value, and perseverance that students show when they are learning or being taught.” Repeats the key elements we’re interested in making part of units and lessons. This reiterates what will be heard from the Jigsaw readings. Summative slide before we move to Part 3 and begin to examine what engagement looks and sounds like.

41 Part Three: Identifying and Checking For Engaging Qualities in Teacher Practice
Purpose: Provide opportunity for learners to discuss what application in the classroom looks like. Content: Detailed description of what implementation looks like; Group discussion on what implementation looks like in a variety of contexts. This is a section that can be altered to best address your audience. Several choices of videos from Teaching Channel, or choose your own favorites from another source.

42 Purpose and Content Purpose: Provide opportunity for learners to discuss what application in the classroom looks like. Content: Applying learning from Schlechty: group discussion on what implementation looks like in a variety of contexts; applying the design qualities in a measureable, observable way. Creating a self-assessment instrument. Hidden slide.

43 Students Who Are Engaged…
learn at high levels and have a profound grasp of what they learn, retain what they learn, and can transfer what they learn to new contexts. Take from the Introduction to the Schlechty Center. We now see action Verbs—Learn, Retain, Transfer. This connects with Visible Learning. Hattie’s goal! Phillip Schlechty

44 Students Who Are Strategically Compliant…
learn at high levels but have a superficial grasp of what they learn, do not retain what they learn, and usually cannot transfer what they learn from one context to another. Next slide coming up asks participants to compare and contrast, so it uses the content of these two slides.

45 Unpack “Strategically Compliant” and “Engaged”
With a shoulder partner, discuss what teachers will see and hear when students are engaged rather than just compliant. Jot your thoughts on a sticky note. Engaged Compliant Allow about a minute for participants to talk and jot down thoughts. In the past, what might an administrator have looked for when doing observations? Was that truly engagement? Share with the whole group. Trainer may want to record findings on a sheet of chart paper. Maybe take it back to what our favorite teachers did…how did that impact what we did in their classrooms?

46 Application Using what you have learned about lesson design qualities for engagement and what one would expect to see and hear from engaged students, evaluate the Tiny House video, a building unit, by using the Student Engagement Graphic Organizer. Does it contain the design concepts of context? Does it contain design concepts of choice? Does it exemplify an engaging lesson? Pass out or direct attention to the Graphic Organizer. It contains the elements of design, and has spaces to note and remark whether the design elements are present. Tiny House is a video from Teaching Channel. It is an example of high school students actually building a house, albeit on a very small scale. If presenters wish, this video can be replaced by one that is more grade level or subject specific. Tiny House is an exceptional example—it contains all of the design qualities. Hand out the organizer, which is shown on the next slide, and explain its use. Participants will view the video, then comment on the presence of all the critical design elements. If you wish for participants to fill this one out, please provide multiple copies of the assessment organizer—participants are asked to view another video and comment again. Handout: Student Engagement Graphic Organizer

47 Organizer for Evaluating the Critical Design Qualities
Definition Clear and Apparent Missing or Unclear Product Focus The opportunity to structure tasks and activities so that what students are to learn is linked to some product, performance, or exhibition to which the student attaches personal value. Affirmation of Performance The possibility of designing tasks and activities so that the performance of students is made visible to persons who are significant in their lives, as well as designing the work in ways that make it clear that the quality of the performance of the student has meaning and value to peers and others whose opinions the student values and cares about. Affiliation The possibility of designing tasks so that students are provided the opportunity to work with peers as well as with parents, outside experts, and other adults, including but not limited to the teacher. Novelty and Variety The possibility of providing students the opportunity to employ a wide range of media and approaches when engaged in the activities assigned and encouraged. Choice The possibility of designing tasks and activities so that students can exercise choice either in what they are to learn or how they go about learning that which it is required that they learn. Authenticity The possibility of linking learning tasks to things that are of real interest to the student, especially when the student is not interested in learning what adults have determined s/he needs to learn. Student Engagement Phillip Schlechty’s Design Qualities of Student Work: Context (Must be present) Definition Clear and Apparent Missing or Unclear Content and Substance What is to be learned and the level of student interest in the subject or topic Organization of Knowledge How the work is organized—problem solving approach, discovery approach, didactic teaching—with consideration for learning styles that are assumed or are to be addressed Clear and Compelling Product Standards The extent to which students are clear about what they are to do, what the products they produce would look like, what standards will be applied to evaluate these products and their performances, and how much value students attach to the standards that are to be used; that is, do the students believe in the standards and see them as personally compelling? Protection from Adverse Consequences for Initial Failures Extent to which the task is designed so students feel free to try without fear that initial failures will bring them humiliation, implicit punishment, or negative sanctions The 10 qualities have been placed in an organizer to use with the next activities. Participants will determine if lessons or units have the recommended design qualities. Handout: Organizer of Schlechty’s Design Qualities

48 Video from Teaching Channel
Tiny House https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/tiny-house-collaborative-project-hth Consultants may wish to select a more age-appropriate video; however, this one has it all…it’s fast-paced, only 3 minutes long. Good way to set the stage. Allow participants to view, mark the organizer, and pair-share with colleagues or their team. Spend 3-5 minutes debriefing the video. Obviously we’re not all going to do a project that elaborate, but it has engagement-plus! There is no other way to do this project without being totally engaged.

49 Engaging Students Watch the next video. Once again, look for Schlechty’s Critical Design Elements. This time, watch as a Critical Friend. On an organizer, mark all the qualities you observed. Compare your organizer with that of a table partner or team member. What necessary elements were missing, if any? Participants may use another clean copy of the rubric/organizer for this one and then share their findings. Choose a video appropriate for your participants. See choices on the next slide. Easy to make it fit your audience. Handout: Student Engagement Graphic Organizer

50 Video from Teaching Channel
“Keep it or Junk It” https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/student-run-lesson Other good choices to share from Teaching Channel include: Antiques Roadshow, a Kindergarten Show and Tell History of the Earth Bringing Legends to Life Exploring Garden Ecosystems Make It Real: Connecting Math to Life These can be accessed through the search bar on the home page of Teaching Channel. Time and audience may dictate the best choice. Presenter knows the audience and can best make an appropriate choice for the second video.

51 Other choices… https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/show-and-tell-themes https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-geological-time https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/real-world-math-examples https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-through-legends Hide this slide. These range from kindergarten to seventh grade to lower elementary…choose what works.

52 Checking a Lesson for Engaging Design Qualities
The goal is not to redesign each lesson, or to present an alternate plan for writing lessons. The goal is to purposely incorporate qualities that will enhance and promote student engagement. Then we can consider the degree of attention, curiosity, interest, value, and perseverance that students show when they are learning or being taught. Big Ideas to process after watching and evaluating the videos. Can we begin with what teachers already have as lessons and incorporate the Design qualities to create more engaging lessons? It’s important not to throw out everything—but learn how to enhance lessons and units with what we KNOW impacts student learning. An engaged student is a motivated student.

53 Teachers Need to Evaluate Student Engagement
One means of assessment is observation: Do students talk about their learning outside of class? Can students handle mild frustration? Do students have the strategies they need in order to persevere? Do they participate in class discussions? Are they enthusiastic? Do they have a positive attitude? Ibid. Parsons, Nuland, Parsons. What will lessons look like, sound like? What do we see and hear in the classroom?

54 Reflection: Developing and Sustaining Student Engagement
Teachers should seek feedback from students as to the success of the teaching, providing criteria for younger or inexperienced student evaluators. Teachers should then reflect on their own performance; how can lessons be changed in order to be more engaging? A preparatory slide that leads to self-assessment.

55 Sample Survey from Grant Wiggins
Examine a copy of Wiggins’ online student survey. https://grantwiggins.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ae-student-survey pdf What kinds of information would teachers receive? If teachers can access electronically, that will save making copies. If not, you may wish to make hard copies for participants to look at together. Perhaps not every person needs a copy…share in pairs, etc. Handout: Wiggins Student Survey Instrument

56 Constructing an Engagement Assessment Instrument
Consider your grade level and teaching goals. With a colleague or team, create an end-of-unit Student Survey with no more than 4 questions: what questions would you ask students that would indicate students were engaged? When time is called, each team will share one of their questions with the whole group. Facilitator may wish to record these shared questions on a piece of chart paper, thus consolidating the ideas presented by the whole group. When groups share out, ask that they share one that has not already been given, or, if they don’t have anything unique, how they might tweak an idea already given for a different grade level or content area.

57 Grant Wiggins’ Blog: Shadowing a Student for 2 Days
What the teacher learned aligns with what Schlechty’s model suggests. Hide this slide if there is not time to process this information. At the bottom of this post are the links to the survey and other information. If there is time, teachers may wish to bookmark this blog and the resulting blast of responses. Other postings regarding a student survey:

58 Robert J. Marzano, John Hattie, Doug Lemov
Part 4: Enhancing Lessons and Units Using the Design Qualities of Engagement Robert J. Marzano, John Hattie, Doug Lemov This section consists of time to evaluate the resources of Marzano, Hattie, and Lemov as posted on DESE’s website. If participants can access this information electronically, there is no need to make copies of the work. The strategies/practices/techniques chosen align with Standard 1, Quality Indicator 2: content knowledge aligned with appropriate instruction; Standard 4, Quality Indicator 1: Instructional strategies leading to student engagement in problem-solving and critical thinking; Standard 4, Quality Indicator 2: Appropriate use of instructional resources to enhance student learning; Standard 5, Quality Indicator 1: classroom management techniques

59 Qualities that Help Increase Student Engagement
Our goal is to purposely incorporate design qualities that will enhance and promote student engagement. DESE has provided a Growth Guide on its website to help educators as they review and develop lessons with engaging qualities. The Growth Guides provide numerous strategies, techniques, and practices.

60 Growth Guide Expert Groups: Connecting to the Missouri Teaching Standards
In teams, examine the contents of your folder containing Proven Practices. (or access electronically) The Standards are aligned with the Missouri Teaching Standards that focus on student engagement, problem solving and critical thinking, and classroom management Set up groups to be workable for your audience: tables, grade levels, etc. Presenter will prepare copies of strategies related to the Missouri Teaching Standards noted at the beginning of the presentation: Standard 1, Quality Indicator 2; Standard 4, Quality Indicator 1; Standard 4, Quality Indicator 2, and Standard 5, Quality Indicator 1. The size of the group will dictate how best to prepare the handouts—in folders, etc. Again, if participants have access to laptops/Internet, it may be easier to have them look at these resources online. All relate to student engagement-- Lemov, Hattie, and Marzano. Time will dictate how you will design this activity. It could be organized by researcher, standard, etc. and narrowed in scope. These handouts come from the DESE website at the following addresses: Consultants can use table teams to review the handouts. Each team will then collaboratively fill out a Growth Guide; they can choose one of the standards and choose a techniques or strategies that will be effective in their grade level or content area. These can be shared whole-group. This will give them a feel for what 3 different researchers/practitioners can be implemented to increase student engagement. Handouts: Folders with Proven Practices, and Growth Guide: Changing Practice

61 Growth Guide Expert Groups
As a team, examine the growth guides for one designated Standard/Quality Indicator. Complete the organizer by choosing one practice/technique/strategy from each researcher that you could implement to increase student engagement in your classroom. Be ready to share with the whole group. Change this to work best for your audience. This could take minutes or longer if time. It’s a LOT to look at—the ultimate goal is to let participants know this resource is there to access. So choosing ONE Standard to focus on across the board will help limit the search. That’s the way the Growth Guide organizer is set up: participants indicate the Standard and Quality Indicator Number, summarize it in the second section, and then fill in the space for one-each of the Hattie, Marzano, and Lemov offerings.

62 Part 5: Assessment and Reflection
Purpose: Provide opportunity for the learners to reflect on their learning and potential implementation challenges. Content: Post-assessment learner knowledge; Reflect on personal teaching context and implementation

63 Sharing Lessons that Worked!
What have you taught that started fires in the minds of students? What expertise do you have to share?

64 Self-Assessment: Graffiti Wall and Alley Walk Activity
As a team, talk-- and then choose a lesson that a member has recently taught to use as an example. Splash the lesson title, grade level, and main components in an attention-grabbing way on chart paper using markers, “graffiti style.” Post the lesson. Graffiti Style suggests using large, interesting print, words splashed across the page, or other ways to convey big ideas. Be bold and attention-grabbing. Then during the “alley walk’, participants can move teams from lesson to lesson, asking that they pause and comment using brightly-colored markers. After teams have rotated, presenter may ask for a summary statement or final reflection of this lesson and about the learning.

65 Chose a well-known person That person challenged the status quo
LIVING WAX MUSEUM Research project Grade 11 Chose a well-known person That person challenged the status quo Made a positive impact on society Students researched person Found significant quotes Identified a “game changer” Wrote a script Internalized/memorized information Portrayed their person as a “was museum” character at local public library Performed for library patrons An example taken from Teaching Channel. Video accompanies this lesson description. Lesson can be downloaded. Just an example…

66 Alley Walk When teams are finished, take an “Alley Walk” and, using colored markers, note and applaud appropriate design elements that increase student engagement. Use the Schlechty handout if needed.

67 Authentic! LIVING WAX MUSEUM Research project Grade 11
Chose a well-known person Person that challenged the status quo Made a positive impact on society Students researched person Found significant quotes Found a “game changer” Wrote a script Internalized/memorized information Portrayed that person as a “was museum” character at local public library Performed for library patrons Element of choice Content Graffiti will be marked up with elements of Schlechty’s elements of design and other positives… Authentic! Affirmation

68 Part Six: Where Are You Going? Planning Next Steps
Purpose: Provide opportunity for learner to outline their implementation steps and plans for follow-up coaching. Content: Template for outlining implementation steps in personal teaching contexts and follow-up coaching; Additional resources for further learning

69 Purpose and Content Purpose: Provide opportunity for learners to outline their implementation steps and plans for follow-up coaching. Content: Template for outlining implementation steps in personal teaching contexts and follow-up coaching; Additional resources for further learning

70 Practice Profile

71 Implementation Fidelity
Engaging Student Learners PRACTICE: IMPLEMENTATION FIDELITY CHECKLIST Instructions: This checklist is designed for frequent checking on the fidelity of implementing the Student Engagement Practice. It is suggested that educators self-monitor their fidelity daily during early implementation. An on-site coach may also observe and use this form to record fidelity. Completed checklists can be discussed during coaching conversations. If the number of ‘Yes’ items is repeatedly fewer than four, (4), then coaching may be beneficial. Teacher… Yes Partially No If partially or no, explain. 1 Includes design elements of Content and Substance, Organization of Knowledge, Clear and Compelling Product Standards, and Protection from Adverse Consequences for Initial Failures in lessons. 2 Includes a design element of choice: Product Focus, Affirmation of Performance, Affiliation, Novelty and Variety, Choice, and Authenticity. 3 Monitors students to observe that they are attentive, committed, persistent, and find meaning and value in tasks. 4 Seeks end-of-unit student input and reflection on the qualities of engagement. 5 Refers to the Growth Guide on the DESE website in order to include strategies and techniques to enhance student engagement. Total

72 Exit Ticket: Next Steps
On a sticky note, please indicate Today’s date Your building Your grade level team Two ideas from today’s training that you will implement to increase student engagement

73 Next Steps: Action=Results
Complete the Next Steps template. Example is included in the learning package materials. What steps will you take to start implementing?

74 Resources for Practices, Strategies, and Techniques
For research and proven practices with regard to implementing teaching standards in the see the following: https://grantwiggins.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/ae-student-survey pdf

75 Sources Cushman, Kathleen. “Minds On Fire”. Educational Leadership. Dec. 2013/Jan Dack, Hillary and Tomlinson, Carol Ann. Searching for the Irresistible. kappanmagazine.org. V95 N Daniels, Kevin MSDC Conference presentation. Creating Conditions for the Highly Engaged Classroom and Student. Gardiner, Steve. Stop the Pay, Stop the Play. Kappanmagazine.org V95 N8. Missouri Department of Education Website. Growth Guide. Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward. The ABCs of Student Engagement. kappanmagazine.org V95 N8. Schlechty, Phillip. Introduction to the Schlechty Center. Wiggins, Grant. Blog.

76 Teacher Resources For research and proven practices with regard to implementing teaching standards in the classroom, see the following: https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?landing_page=General+Teacher+Videos+Landing+Page&gclid=CPyG6J73ur4CFVQFMgodQggAYw


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