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Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Monday Which one of the following is a lie about……? “Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged.

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Presentation on theme: "Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Monday Which one of the following is a lie about……? “Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Monday Which one of the following is a lie about……? “Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.” – Mark Twain SNOW DAY LATE START

2 Past, Present, Future Monday Intro to Unit 1 Perspectives Archetypes Late Start Patterns in Top Grossing Movies Archetypes Archetype notes Application of notes to a movie (SCR)

3 Short Stories Through a Critical Lens Monday Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Effective speaking in formal and informal settings requires appropriate use of methods and audience awareness 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals Objective: you will be able to identify common patterns (for plot, character, setting, and theme) among well-known movies. Late Start Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. By learning to examine situations from different perspectives, we open ourselves to recognizing, understanding, explaining, and judging the ways in which we, as well as others, conduct ourselves, in order to more productively function in an every changing world. Inquiry Questions: What is critical theory? How does one’s perspective influence the reading of a text? How does reading from a particular perspective influence what is seen as important within a text and how characters, events, and theme are understood? What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? How is literature a voice of social commentary?

4 Instruction: Obtain Monday Answers to Questions (Student Information sheet) What’s the longest writing assignment? Will we have to rush towards the end of the year being that we graduate earlier Do or will you have it planned? Bathroom rules? Can I work ahead? Can I do or have work for the future? Why must you go so fast? Why do we have an oral presentation in a reading class? Will there be extra credit opportunities? Do we have to present in front of the class at any point in this class? Are you going to be chill? Can you read this? How is this course different from English 7? Will you assign any books? How many essays do we have to write? Do we get extra days if we miss a day? Do we choose the book? I use my phone as a planner. Is this acceptable? Is this class required? If we do not feel that we will have enough time to finish an assignment, can we ask you for extended time a reasonable number of days before the due date?

5 Activities: Develop I Do - We Do Monday Purpose: to determine common plot patterns and character types among the top grossing movies. Tasks: 1. Categorize movies based on plot patterns (situations), character types, settings, and themes. Example: Underdog Protagonists (characters who, although one wouldn't expect it, rise above struggle) 1.Finding Nemo 2.Home Alone 3.Forest Gump 4.The Lion King 2. THEN, write a note under each movie list/category that explains what this pattern reveals about us a humans, a society, a culture, Americans, etc. What does this category reveal about people’s hopes, desires, fears, values, history? Example: Because America was founded after small colonies broke away from British rule, we tend to celebrate and admire those who can do the same. Outcome: Groups report out about one of your categories.

6 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday Which one of the following is a lie about…? “Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.” – Mark Twain Hey, another snow day late start!

7 Past, Present, Future Tuesday Late Start Questions answered Finish Top grossing movies & add what they reveal Hey, another snow day late start! Report out Top grossing movies – what they reveal Review Unit 1 & introduce 1 st lens Notes on Common Archetypes In what movies do we see these? SCR (short constructed response)

8 Short Stories Through a Critical Lens Tuesday Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Effective speaking in formal and informal settings requires appropriate use of methods and audience awareness 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals Objective: you will be able to identify common patterns (for plot, character, setting, and theme) across well-known movies. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. By learning to examine situations from different perspectives, we open ourselves to recognizing, understanding, explaining, and judging the ways in which we, as well as others, conduct ourselves, in order to more productively function in an every changing world. Inquiry Questions: What is critical theory? How does one’s perspective influence the reading of a text? How does reading from a particular perspective influence what is seen as important within a text and how characters, events, and theme are understood? What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? How is literature a voice of social commentary?

9 Activities: Develop I Do - We Do Tuesday Purpose: to discover common plot patterns and character types that your peers see among the top grossing movies. Task: Groups report out about one of your categories. 1.Category name 2.Movie titles 3.What it reveals about us as humans, our collective culture (hopes, desires, fears, values, history) Example: Underdog Protagonists (characters who, although one wouldn't expect it, rise above struggle) 1.Finding Nemo 2.Home Alone 3.Forest Gump 4.The Lion King Because America was founded after small colonies broke away from British rule, we tend to celebrate and admire those who can do the same. Outcome: Do you see any commonalities among categories and what various groups identified? Now, we are ready to look at common archetypes identified in literature!

10 Review/Preview You Do Tuesday Unit 1 Critical Lenses Literary Perspectives Tool Kit Purpose: to identify the purpose of studying critical theory/lenses and what an archetypal “critic” (reader) looks for when reading through this lens. Task: Read the information provided on this yellow sheet* in order to answer the questions at the bottom of the sheet. Outcome: responses to all questions * Given out Friday – on back of Unit 1 Overview

11 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Wednesday While you wait for attendance to be taken, did you find the answers to the 5 questions on your yellow “Unit 1 Critical Lenses: Literary Perspectives Tool Kit” sheet? If not, find them now! I might be asking you for an answer! Which one of the following is a lie about….? “Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.” – Mark Twain

12 Past, Present, Future Wednesday Hey, another snow day late start! Report out Top grossing movies – what they reveal Review Unit 1 & introduce 1 st lens Notes on Common Archetypes In what movies do we see these? SCR (short constructed response)

13 Short Stories Through a Critical Lens Wednesday Standards 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies Objective: you will be able to define common archetypes and suggest movies that might fit various archetypes. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. By learning to examine situations from different perspectives, we open ourselves to recognizing, understanding, explaining, and judging the ways in which we, as well as others, conduct ourselves, in order to more productively function in an every changing world. Inquiry Questions: What is critical theory? How does one’s perspective influence the reading of a text? How does reading from a particular perspective influence what is seen as important within a text and how characters, events, and theme are understood? What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? How is literature a voice of social commentary?

14 Instruction: Obtain& Apply We Do Wednesday See Introduction to archetypes PPT Purpose: to obtain information about common archetypes in literature Tasks: Fill in the missing notes on the graphic organizer Stop periodically and discuss: What movies (that we’ve discussed) include one of the archetypes recently identified in our notes? How does it exist in the movie? Outcome: graphic organizer completed in order to apply ideas movies you know and to SS #1 AND, eventually… Select one of the movies we’ve discussed and identify what archetypes exist within it; look for journey patterns, situational/plot archetypes, character archetypes, setting archetypes, and other symbols. Write a short constructed response that identifies the movie title and general topic/subject of the movie, gives an example from the movie and explain how this example fits an particular archetype.

15 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Thursday If you were not here yesterday, spend the first few minutes getting the notes from yesterday. Which one of the following is a lie about….? “Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.” – Mark Twain

16 Past, Present, Future Thursday Review Unit 1 & introduce 1 st lens Notes on Common Archetypes In what movies do we see these? Notes on Common Archetypes In what movies do we see these? SCR (short constructed response)

17 Short Stories Through a Critical Lens Thursday Standards 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies Objective: you will be able to define common archetypes and suggest movies that might fit various archetypes. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. By learning to examine situations from different perspectives, we open ourselves to recognizing, understanding, explaining, and judging the ways in which we, as well as others, conduct ourselves, in order to more productively function in an every changing world. Inquiry Questions: What is critical theory? How does one’s perspective influence the reading of a text? How does reading from a particular perspective influence what is seen as important within a text and how characters, events, and theme are understood? What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? How is literature a voice of social commentary?

18 Instruction: Obtain& Apply We Do Thursday See Introduction to archetypes PPT Purpose: to obtain information about common archetypes in literature Tasks: Fill in the missing notes on the graphic organizer Stop periodically and discuss: What movies (that we’ve discussed) include one of the archetypes recently identified in our notes? How does it exist in the movie? Outcome: graphic organizer completed in order to apply ideas movies you know and to SS #1 AND, eventually… Select one of the movies we’ve discussed and identify what archetypes exist within it; look for journey patterns, situational/plot archetypes, character archetypes, setting archetypes, and other symbols. Write a short constructed response that identifies the movie title and general topic/subject of the movie, gives two examples from the movie and explains how these example fit different but particular archetypes from our notes.

19 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Friday No truth/lie today

20 Past, Present, Future Friday Notes on Common Archetypes In what movies do we see these? SCR (short constructed response) SS#1 “Young Goodman Brown” through an archetypal lens

21 Short Stories Through a Critical Lens Friday Standard 3. Writing and Composition 1. Style, detail, expressive language, and genre create a well-crafted statement directed at an intended audience and purpose 2. Ideas, evidence, structure, and style create persuasive, academic, and technical texts for particular audiences and specific purposes 3. Standard English conventions effectively communicate to targeted audiences and purposes Objective: to show what you know about archetypes Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. By learning to examine situations from different perspectives, we open ourselves to recognizing, understanding, explaining, and judging the ways in which we, as well as others, conduct ourselves, in order to more productively function in an every changing world. Inquiry Questions: What is critical theory? How does one’s perspective influence the reading of a text? How does reading from a particular perspective influence what is seen as important within a text and how characters, events, and theme are understood? What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? How is literature a voice of social commentary?

22 Instruction: Obtain Friday

23 Activities: Develop & Apply We Do – We Do Friday Purpose: Tasks: Outcome:

24 Coming Soon….

25 Instruction: Obtain See Introduction to archetypes PPT Purpose: to obtain information about common archetypes in literature Task: Fill in the missing notes on the graphic organizer Stop periodically and discuss: What movies (that we’ve discussed) include one of the archetypes recently identified in our notes? How does it exist in the movie? Outcome: graphic organizer completed in order to apply ideas movies you know and to SS #1 Select one of the movies we’ve discussed and identify what archetypes exist within it; look for journey patterns, situational/plot archetypes, character archetypes, setting archetypes, and other symbols. Write a short constructed response that identifies the movie title and general topic/subject of the movie, gives an example from the movie and explain how this example fits an particular archetype.

26 ARCHETYPE: An original model or pattern from which other later copies are made, especially a character, an action, or situation that seems to represent common patterns of human life. Often, archetypes include a symbol, a theme, a setting, or a character that some critics think have a common meaning in an entire culture, or even the entire human race. These images have particular emotional resonance and power. Archetypes recur in different times and places in myth, literature, folklore, fairy tales, dreams, artwork, and religious rituals. Using the comparative anthropological work of Sir James Frazer's The Golden Bough, the psychologist Carl Jung theorized that the archetype originates in the collective unconscious of mankind, i.e., the shared experiences of a race or culture, such as birth, death, love, family life, and struggles to survive and grow up. These would be expressed in the subconscious of an individual who would recreate them in myths, dreams, and literature. Examples of archetypes found cross-culturally include the following: collective unconscious (1) Recurring symbolic situations (such as the orphaned prince or the lost chieftain's son raised ignorant of his heritage until he is rediscovered by his parents, or the damsel in distress rescued from a hideous monster by a handsome young man who later marries the girl. Also, the long journey, the difficult quest or search, the catalog of difficult tasks, the pursuit of revenge, the descent into the underworld, redemptive rituals, fertility rites, the great flood, the End of the World),descent into the underworld (2) Recurring themes (such as the Faustian bargain; pride preceding a fall; the inevitable nature of death, fate, or punishment; blindness; madness; taboos such as forbidden love, patricide, or incest),Faustian bargain (3) Recurring characters (such as witches or ugly crones who cannibalize children, lame blacksmiths of preternatural skill, womanizing Don Juans, the hunted man, the femme fatale, the snob, the social climber, the wise old man as mentor or teacher, star-crossed lovers; the caring mother-figure, the helpless little old lady, the stern father-figure, the guilt-ridden figure searching for redemption, the braggart, the young star-crossed lovers, the bully, the villain in black, the oracle or prophet, the mad scientist, the underdog who emerges victorious, the mourning widow or women in lamentation), (4) Symbolic colors (green as a symbol for life, vegetation, or summer; blue as a symbol for water or tranquility; white or black as a symbol of purity; or red as a symbol of blood, fire, or passion) and so on. (5) Recurring images (such as blood, water, pregnancy, ashes, cleanness, dirtiness, caverns, phallic symbols, yonic symbols, the ruined tower, the rose or lotus, the lion, the snake, the eagle, the hanged man, the dying god that rises again, the feast or banquet, the fall from a great height).phallic symbolsyonic symbols The study of these archetypes in literature is known as archetypal criticism or mythic criticism. Archetypes are also called universal symbols. Contrast with private symbol.archetypal criticismprivate symbol Wheeler, --- Dr. “Literary Terms and Definitions.” Carson-Newman University. 3 Sept Oct “http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_A.html “http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_A.html

27 Short Stories Through a Critical Lens day Standard 1. Oral Expression and Listening 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals Objectives: you will be able to identify common archetypes in literature. You will be able to identify and give examples of how top grossing movies include one or more of these archetypes. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Examining and practicing writer’s craft allows us to better represent our own thoughts in any workplace or personal situation. Inquiry Question(s) What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? How does one’s perspective influence the reading of a text? How is literature a voice of social commentary?

28 Academic Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Effective speaking in formal and informal settings requires appropriate use of methods and audience awareness 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies 2. Interpreting and evaluating complex informational texts require the understanding of rhetoric, critical reading, and analysis skills 3. Writing and Composition 1. Style, detail, expressive language, and genre create a well-crafted statement directed at an intended audience and purpose 2. Ideas, evidence, structure, and style create persuasive, academic, and technical texts for particular audiences and specific purposes 3. Standard English conventions effectively communicate to targeted audiences and purposes 4. Research and Reasoning 1. Independent research designs articulate and defend information, conclusions, and solutions that address specific contexts and purposes 2. Logical arguments distinguish facts from opinions; and evidence defines reasoned judgment


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