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Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday How was your 3-day weekend? While you wait…. Quick Write: Open your composition notebook and start a new page 9/2/14.

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Presentation on theme: "Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday How was your 3-day weekend? While you wait…. Quick Write: Open your composition notebook and start a new page 9/2/14."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday How was your 3-day weekend? While you wait…. Quick Write: Open your composition notebook and start a new page 9/2/14. Think about and then jot down some notes about the following: 1.How has school treated you over the past 11 years? Have you had good experiences? Bad experiences? Overall, how would you describe it? 2.What 5 words come to mind when you think about your elementary school days? 3.What 5 words come to mind when you think about your middle school/junior high days? 4.What 5 words come to mind when you think about your high school days (9 to 11)? Homework: Finish reading and annotating “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexis

2 Past, Present, Future Tuesday Friday: Reading and annotation of “Introduction to Students: Active Reading and the Writing Process” article Monday: no school “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Background Read and annotate “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Small group analysis - chart notes

3 Creative Non-Fiction Tuesday Standard(s) 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies Objective: you will be able to practice your active reading “Indian Education” strategies, annotating for plot events, feelings/emotions (tone), and big ideas/realizations (theme) Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills needed in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Inquiry Question(s) How do our experiences shape us? What is the significance of a mentor text? What topics are best for developing and planning a work of creative nonfiction?

4 Instruction: Obtain I Do Tuesday Purpose: to acquaint ourselves with some background knowledge prior to reading the text Outcome: write/share 1 personal reaction, 1 statement of new knowledge or 1 idea or question you have based on the following information Background on the U.S. government’s “Indian Schools” Beginning in the late 1800s and continuing in the 1950s, gov’t policymakers established boarding schools for Native American youth to help them assimilate into the dominant culture and thus become “civilized.” To this end, children were forcibly removed from their homes for long periods to separate them from native traditions. At the boarding schools, they were given a cursory academic education and spent most of their time studying Christian teachings and working to offset the cost of their schooling.

5 Background on the U.S. government’s “Indian Schools” Continued…. Tuesday Students were punished for speaking their own language or practicing their own religion. Responding to protests from the American Indian Movement in the 1970s, the government began to send fewer Native American to boarding schools and retreated from its goal of assimilation at boarding schools and at newly established reservation schools. Currently, gov’t funding for Native American schools remains considerably lower than for other public schools, and students often make do with inadequate and antiquated facilities, equipment and textbooks. US government subsidies (housing, medical, food) help Native Americans on reservations, as they do other Americans not living on reservations but who also need assistance.

6 Outcome Tuesday Write 1 personal reaction or 1 statement of new knowledge or 1 idea or question you have based on the background on the U.S. government’s “Indian Schools” Stand and share

7 Instruction: Obtain I Do Tuesday Purpose: to model how to read and annotate “Indian Education” Tasks: 1.Have out an ARG handout 2.Pre-read: annotate for title, author, publisher, purpose/text type 3.Read aloud “First Grade” 4.Annotate for…. plot events feelings/emotions significance of section (big idea/realization) questions, connections (text to text, to self, to world) Outcome: Questions?

8 Activity: Develop & Apply We Do – You Do Tuesday Purpose: to actively read “Indian Education,” annotating for plot events, feelings/emotions, and significance (realization) Tasks: 1.Read the rest of the text (Second Grade to end Post-script: Class Reunion) 2.Annotate for…. plot events feelings/emotions significance of section (big idea/realization) questions, connections (text to text, to self, to world) Outcome/DOL: Inquiry Question(s) Respond to one of the following: 1.What is one experience that that stood out to you today that shaped the main character? 2.What do you find significant so far about this mentor text (What stands out to you? What makes it important?) 3.What does this text reveal to you at this point about topics that can be developed into a piece of creative non-fiction?

9 Creative Non-Fiction Tuesday Standard(s) 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies Objective: you will be able to practice your active reading “Indian Education” strategies, annotating for plot events, feelings/emotions (tone), and big ideas/realizations (theme) Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills needed in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Inquiry Question(s) The narrator’s experiences in each grade in school are illustrated by specific incidents. Consider the following questions for tomorrow: What do these incidents have in common? What do they reveal about the narrator? About his schools? Homework: If needed, finish reading and annotating “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexis

10 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Wednesday Who is this?! Have out your annotated copy of “Indian Education” from yesterday. Be prepared to respond to one of the following Inquiry Questions: 1.What is one experience that that stood out to you yesterday that shaped the main character? 2.What do you find significant so far about this mentor text (What stands out to you? What makes it important?) 3.What does this text reveal to you at this point about topics that can be developed into a piece of creative non-fiction? Homework: Personal Memoir Brainstorming Chart

11 Past, Present, Future Wednesday “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Background Read and annotate “Indian Education” by Alexie Small group analysis chart notes “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Finish with Mystery Envelopes & Writing Next selection: “Fish Cheek”

12 Creative Non-Fiction Wednesday Standard(s) 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies 1. Oral Expression and Listening 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals Objective: you will be able to synthesis ideas about each grade section of the text in order to draw conclusions about the purpose and meaning of the narrative as a whole. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills needed in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Inquiry Question(s) How do our experiences shape us? What is the significance of a mentor text? What topics are best for developing and planning a work of creative nonfiction?

13 Instruction: Obtain I Do Wednesday Purpose: to review the text in order to come to some conclusions about the purpose and meaning of the narrative Tasks: 1.With your partner, complete the chart for your 3 assigned sections (grades) For example…. Grade 1 Event (literal)Emotions, feelings, attitudes Universal Issues Importance Anywhere Realization, lesson Narrator punches Frenchy St. John & is sent to office Insecure/powerless Angry Confident/proud Bullying & Poverty = stress He is not powerless; he can fight back

14 Activity: Develop & Apply We Do - You Do Wednesday Purpose: to review the text in order to come to some conclusions about the purpose of the narrative Tasks: 1.With your partner, complete the chart for your 3 assigned sections (grades) – See A, B, C, D groups below Assigned Groups with Sections/Grades: A = 2, 6, 10 B = 3, 7, 11 C = 4, 8, 12 D = 5, 9, PS 2.Now, you and your partner find another group (As find Bs, Cs find Ds). Then, share your chart notes with each other and fill these in.

15 Creative Non-Fiction Wednesday Standard(s) 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies 1. Oral Expression and Listening 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals Objective: you will be able to synthesis ideas about each grade section of the text in order to draw conclusions about the purpose and meaning of the narrative as a whole. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills needed in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Inquiry Question(s) How do our experiences shape us? What is the significance of a mentor text? What topics are best for developing and planning a work of creative nonfiction?

16 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Thursday 1.Grab a handout, like the one below, from the front table. 2.Write your name on it and read the directions. 3.Open your composition to Tuesday (9/2) & review your responses to the 4 questions about your school experience. 4.Begin to fill out your Memoir Chart (feel free to skip around)

17 Past, Present, Future Thursday “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Small group analysis chart notes “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Finish chart notes Start Grab Bag & Writing Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Report Out: Mystery Envelopes & Writing Next selection: “Fish Cheek”

18 Creative Non-Fiction Thursday Standard(s) 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies 1. Oral Expression and Listening 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals Objective: you will be able to synthesis ideas about each grade section of the text in order to draw conclusions about the purpose and meaning of the narrative as a whole. Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills needed in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Inquiry Question(s) How do our experiences shape us? What is the significance of a mentor text? What topics are best for developing and planning a work of creative nonfiction?

19 Activities: Develop & Apply We Do Thursday Finish tasks from yesterday: 1.You have 10 minutes to find partners to help you fill in your missing chart sections/grades and to teach others about the information you have, too. 2.Outcome: a completed chart in order to come to conclusions about the narrative as a whole Tasks: 1.With your group, read the directions at the bottom of the chart. 2.Consider the sentence starters below to get you started. 3.Write your group’s summary on one sheet with everyone’s name and turn it in! Sherman Alexie memoir is about His purpose is to During the narrative, he shares instances of He often felt because The character realizes that The effect on the reader is Overall, the narrative reveals ----.

20 Homework

21 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Friday While you wait, fill out and/or re-read and add to your K-11 Chart… Homework: Write your imitation vignette; due Monday!

22 Past, Present, Future Friday “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Small group analysis – Paragraph Conclusion/Summary Turned In! chart notes “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Grab Bag & Report Out Writing Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie Writing Next selection: “Fish Cheek”

23 Instruction: Obtain Friday Return Paragraph Conclusion/Summary from yesterday Student Response Model Sherman Alexie’s memoir is about his good and bad experiences as he uses his insecurities and faults to grow into a confident person. His purpose is to show how difficult situations in life can strengthen one to become a better person. During the narrative, he shares instances of strengths when he describes his high school basketball experience. Alexie misses two free throws and decides to have a positive outlook on their victory for playing against an advanced team, instead of focusing on the loss. He rebuilds himself with pride. The effect on the reader is to empower the reader that they can overcome any obstacle. Overall the narrative reveals that everyone should know who they are and to ignore discrimination in all things.

24 Activities: Develop & Apply We Do Friday Purpose: to examine “Indian Education” as a mentor text in order to establish a list of features, strategies, and craft tools for our own written imitations. Tasks: 1.Form groups of 4 2.Draw a slip from the grab bag 3.Discuss and record ideas 4.Finalize what your will report out to the class Outcome: Groups report out & make a class list of responses of these strategies in our own vignettes.

25 Activities: Develop & Apply You Do Friday Select one of your K-11 chart ideas and write it, imitating one of Alexie’s vignettes.* Include at least 3 of Alexie’s strategies. Don’t forget your vignette must also include: universal/big idea a personal event (what happened to you) your feelings what you learned (realization then or in retrospect) * Ending with a brief paragraph, usually a single sentence, that presents an insight * Comparison/contrast within vignette (e.g. Eighth Grade) * Imagery – Dialogue * Hyperbole (exaggeration) * Irony the expression of one's meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result. * Characters and Characterization Homework: finish writing and bring the copy to class Monday!

26 Creative Non-Fiction Friday Standard(s) Objective: you will be able to Relevance: By interpreting complex texts, providing evidence, and communicating ideas, we are not only practicing the skills need in any workplace or postsecondary setting, but also we are examining aspects of ourselves and others and how these as well as social and historical events impact the way in which we communicate. Examining and practicing writer’s craft allows us to better represent our own thoughts in any workplace or personal situation. Inquiry Question(s) How do our experiences shape us? What is the significance of a mentor text? What purpose do mentor texts serve? What can I learn from another writer’s craft? What topics are best for developing and planning a work of creative nonfiction? What genres are most appropriate? How does structure affect clarity? How does figurative language enhance the writer’s intended meaning? In what way is the setting a significant part of a text? How might events in a story be different if the setting were different? What literary genre best fits your interest and why? What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, making personal connections to, and analyzing texts ? If you were invited to write a short story about an event in your life or that of another person, what would you write about and why? How do different genres, formats, styles, and craft techniques help readers understand author’s purpose? Who would your intended audience be for this piece of work? What role does self-reflection have in the learning and writing processes?

27 Academic Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Effective speaking in formal and informal settings requires appropriate use of methods and audience awareness 2. Effective collaborative groups accomplish goals 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies 2. Interpreting and evaluating complex informational texts require the understanding of rhetoric, critical reading, and analysis skills 3. Writing and Composition 1. Style, detail, expressive language, and genre create a well-crafted statement directed at an intended audience and purpose 2. Ideas, evidence, structure, and style create persuasive, academic, and technical texts for particular audiences and specific purposes 3. Standard English conventions effectively communicate to targeted audiences and purposes 4. Research and Reasoning 1. Independent research designs articulate and defend information, conclusions, and solutions that address specific contexts and purposes 2. Logical arguments distinguish facts from opinions; and evidence defines reasoned judgment

28 Coming Soon…. Return “My Name” Imitation Monday Warm up – share your vignette with a partner. Can s/he identify the big idea, summarize what happened, how you felt, and what lesson you learned? What do you need to include more of? Take a few minutes to add their suggestions to your writing. Do the same for your partner. Looping Activity: Use the vignette you wrote for homework Underline the one line you like best and make it the first line of a new draft. Write it at the top of a new sheet of paper. Write for 10 minutes, expanding/developing the line. Share your writing with a partner. Together, identify the strongest/best line from this draft. Repeat the process. Then, share all three pieces of writing with another set of partners. Together, decide what pieces to use from each draft or select the draft they believe strongest/best. HOMEWORK: Edit your draft. Word process and bring final draft in tomorrow. Be sure to include universal idea, what happened, how you felt, what you learned. Also include three strategies Alexie used. Tuesday: Counselors in Wednesday: Fish Cheeks Thursday: Fish Cheeks Friday: (Guest Teacher ½) Fish Cheeks


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