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New York City Scope and Sequence for Grade 2 Case study of New York City as an Urban Community  New York City is an urban community with special.

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Presentation on theme: "New York City Scope and Sequence for Grade 2 Case study of New York City as an Urban Community  New York City is an urban community with special."— Presentation transcript:

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4 New York City Scope and Sequence for Grade 2 Case study of New York City as an Urban Community  New York City is an urban community with special features 3.2a  Features of New York City include skyscrapers, apartment buildings, factories, offices, houses, etc. 3.1e  New York City has a rich and cultural heritage 1.2b, 1.4b  People in New York City travel in a variety of ways 3.1e  New York City remains connected to its historical heritage 1.1a  New York City communities are connected by a system of bridges and tunnels 3.1d, 3.1e  The cultural landscape of New York City includes old and new features 2.2d

5 Common Core Standards Addressed  RL.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.  RL.2.3 Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.  RL.2.4 Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.  RL.2.7 Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.  RI.2.3 Describe the connection between a series of historical events…in a text  RI.2.7 Explain how specific images contribute to and clarify a text

6 Common Core Standards Addressed  W.2.2 Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.  W.2.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

7 Important Facts about New York City In 1931, the Empire State Building was built and known as the tallest building in the world until The Brooklyn Bridge was completed in May of 1883, engineered by the Roebling family. The first subway ride took place on October 27, Firefighters used horse-drawn wagons to put out fires in New York City in the mid 1800s. New York City has 5 boroughs: Queens, Brooklyn, Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island. The Flatiron Building is a famous landmark of architectural importance, built in New York City has changed and grew during the 1700s, 1800s, and 1900s.

8 Fiction Text: My Subway Ride by Paul Dubois Jacobs and Jennifer Swender This is a poetry book that uses fanciful metaphors to describe the narrator’s experience on a subway ride through the five boroughs of New York City. I would use this book in the classroom as a read aloud. Students can explain the metaphors used in the book and describe the line breaks the authors use.

9 Fiction: My New York By Kathy Jakobsen In this book, a young girl gives readers an exciting tour of New York City and its many landmarks and points of interest. The detailed illustrations, facts page, and fold out pages will keep the interest of young readers. I would use this book to have students write their own experiences at a landmark or point of interest in New York City.

10 Fiction: Postcards from New York City: Traveling with Anna by Laura Crawford Laura Crawford tells a young girl’s story of her trip to New York with postcards from different places in New York City. Underneath each postcard are facts written in English and Spanish! I would use this book in the classroom as a read aloud and teach students how to write postcards. I would also use it to teach fact and opinion.

11 Fiction: New York’s Bravest by Mary Pope Osborne This fiction book is based on a real-life firefighter in New York City. Mose Humphreys is the star in this urban tall tale about New York City firefighters during the mid 1800s. This book would be great for a read aloud. Students could identify the elements of a tall tale, or compare and contrast firefighting of the past and present as extension activites.

12 Fiction: Flying Over Brooklyn by Myron Uhlberg A young boy’s dream of flying over his beloved Brooklyn comes true in this charming story. He gives the reader a bird’s eye view of this borough, and takes readers for a ride through Prospect Park, the Brooklyn Bridge, and Coney Island. I would use this book as an example of descriptive language. Students could also describe the landmarks found in Brooklyn.

13 Poetry: Under New York by Linda Oatman High This poetry picture book depicts what happens beneath the streets of New York City. I would use this book to compare and contrast what is happening below and above the streets. I would also teach students about line breaks in poetry, and rhythm.

14 Poetry: New York, New York performed by Frank Sinatra Start spreading the news I am leaving today I want to be a part of it New York, New York These vagabond shoes They are longing to stray Right through the very heart of it New York, New York I want to wake up in that city That doesn’t sleep And find I’m king of the hill Top of the heap My little town blues They are melting away I gonna make a brand new Start of it In old New York

15 Poetry: New York, New York performed by Frank Sinatra If I can make it there I’ll make it anywhere It’s up to you New York, New York I want to wake up in that city That never sleeps And find I’m king of the hill Top of the list Head of the heap King of the hill These are little town blues They have all melted away I am about to make a brand New start of it Right there in old New York And you bet…..baby If I can make it there You know, I’m gonna make it Just about anywhere Come on, come through New York, New York, New York

16 Poetry: New York, New York performed by Frank Sinatra  This well known song has been embraced by New Yorkers since Although it was originally written by Fred Ebb and composed by John Kander for Liza Minnelli, Frank Sinatra’s version is now played at many New York social events, and is one of Sinatra’s most familiar songs.  At the end of the unit, I would read this aloud with my students before having them listen to the song itself, to focus on the lyrics of the song. I would ask them to develop reasons for him wanting to come to New York. As an extension, I would ask them to write another verse in the song, or write a two-verse song of their own about New York City.

17 N.Y. Harbor: Sunday Evening by Robert Clairmont There is something about this quietness, the sun having gone down and the sky so full of color. What are all those ferryboats doing going down so quietly, all by themselves, down the river? The buildings, standing there so still, what are they doing there? What is all this darkness? Where are all the people? O, they'll be all around again, don't worry, they'll all come back again. They'll be here again after the darkness, after the dawn: they'll all be here again.

18 N.Y. Harbor: Sunday Evening by Robert Clairmont  This poem was written about New York Harbor, which refers to the Hudson River and New York Bay.  I would read aloud this poem and have students illustrate it, focusing on how the author describes the setting of the poem.

19 Nonfiction: Empire State Building by Elizabeth Mann This nonfiction book shows readers how the Empire State Building took shape in one year. A two-page fold out of the Empire State Building gives readers a close-up look to this famous landmark. Students can write a short report on the Empire State Building using the 5 Ws. Students can also take notes in a sequencing graphic organizer to show the steps and processes taken to build this skyscraper.

20 Nonfiction: Brooklyn Bridge by Lynn Gurlee Lynn Gurlee descries how the Brooklyn Bridge was built in this picture book. Readers will learn about the obstacles and triumphs the Roeblings faced while designing and overseeing the construction of this bridge. I would use this book as a read- aloud due to its easy text pattern. Students could then record notes on a timeline.

21 Nonfiction: Subway: the Story of Tunnels, Tubes, and Tracks by Larry Dane Brimner Readers will develop a new understanding of what it took to build the longest subway system in the world after reading this book. It describes how subways were built, why they were built, and where and when they were built. I would have students write a short report, using the 5 Ws to organize their writing. I would also use this book to compare and contrast travel during the late 1800s and present day.

22 Nonfiction: New York City Buildings by Ann Mace This is an easy-to-read book that shows photographs of different buildings of New York City. Readers can identify the shapes and sizes of the buildings. I would use this book with struggling readers. Students could then describe the shape of other buildings, and use shapes to illustrate them.

23 Nonfiction: This Is New York by Miroslav Sasek This charming book gives readers a vision of New York City’s neighborhoods almost 50 years ago. The vibrant illustrations are a great addition to this book. I would use this book as a read aloud. I would have students describe each neighborhood. I would also have students explain how New York City has changed over the years.


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