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©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL.

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1 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL

2 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL #AvayaATF Is Your WLAN Voice & Video Ready? Perry J. Heliger Sr. Consulting Systems Engineer Avaya

3 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Agenda 1.Market Trends 2.Avaya WLAN 8100 Series Review 3. Supporting Voice & Video 4.Avaya Can Help You Get There 3

4 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL 49% WLAN growth in next five years Emerging Trends Consumer Video over Wi-Fi Bring Your Own Device ac upgrade cycle Mobile Enterprise Application development Service Provider Wi-Fi Cloud-managed WLAN BYOD and Consumerization BYOD and Consumerization 4

5 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL More Wi-Fi Devices than Humans “1.2 billion smart- phones and tablets will be sold in 2013, a 50% increase over 2012” 5

6 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Changing Application Mix Video is the killer app Video soft clients growing at 340% through 2015 Accounts for 51% of mobile data traffic today 6

7 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Evolving Standards n predominant today ~55% of AP shipments 2012 ~90% ac IEEE ratified in 2013 Moderate market adoption ~10% AP shipments by 2016 Niche applications Backward compatible with 11n ac Much faster networking speeds – up to 3 times the bandwidth of n Uses 2 to 4 times the frequency bandwidth (80-160MHz) More efficient data transfers through sophisticated modulation, More antennas (up to 8) 7

8 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL WLAN Market Trends WLAN AP Shipments- Worldwide

9 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Agenda 1.Market Trends 2.Avaya WLAN 8100 Series Review 3. Supporting Voice & Video 4.Avaya Can Help You Get There 9

10 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL 10 Introducing Avaya WLAN 8100 Series Unified Solution with lower TCO Real-time Optimized Leading Scalability Next generation architecture that integrates wireless LAN forwarding directly into the switching architecture providing the most cost effective way to support the mobile traffic explosion Unified Wired/Wireless Network & Management & Policy Industry leading video & voice over Wi-Fi (Third party validated - Miercom 2011) 10

11 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL WLAN 8100 Portfolio WLAN 8100 Infrastructure Dual radio, n 8120-E: Plenum rated WAP 8120/8120-E WC 8180 Overlay or Unified WC 8180 / WC L Management WC 8120-O Outdoor n AP Optional Wireless Network Services Avaya 3641/3645 IP Wireless Phones Range of video end points Voice/UCVideo Guest Management Advanced Security Location Services E-911 Unified Wired/ Wireless Guest Manager (idEngines) Real-Time Location Tracking Wireless Intrusion Detection/ Protection X Infusion pump E-911 VoWLAN integration External Antennas 70o, directional 180o, omni-directional WLAN Management Software

12 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL VENA Unified Access (new- Aug 2012) Unifying Wired and Wireless at the Network Core WLAN 8100 R2 and Avaya ERS 8800 R7.2 delivers Avaya’s first unified wired/wireless solution Wireless data forwarding capability embedded in the ERS 8800 core switches WLAN 8180 for management/control traffic only Unprecedented Scaling Leverage core switching network to accommodate huge growth in mobile traffic Best suited for Enterprise Campus and Data Center deployments ERS 8800/ WLAN Unified Access

13 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Gartner MQ for Wired & WLAN Access Infrastructure Magic Quadrant for the Wired and Wireless LAN Access Infrastructure Tim Zimmerman, Mark Fabbi June 13, 2012 This graphic was published by Gartner, Inc. as part of a larger research document and should be evaluated in the context of the entire document. The Gartner document is available upon request from Avaya. Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner's research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Full report is available at 1AY2JQJ&ct=120618&st=sb Note: This is a new Magic Quadrant Gartner introduced in 2012 to reflect the growing market demand for unified wired and wireless access solutions AVAYA: VISIONARY RATING

14 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Agenda 1.Market Trends 2.Avaya WLAN Series Review 3. Supporting Voice & Video 4.Avaya Can Help You Get There

15 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Why plan? 15 BYOD support ac Quality of service Network overloaded Video support 3-5 devices per user Security By 2015, 80% of newly installed wireless networks will be obsolete because of a lack of proper planning Gartner, 2011 )

16 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Planning Considerations - Voice Define voice applications and handsets a, n, interoperability tested? Coverage area Which areas of the WLAN network need to support voice Anticipate mobile nature of users & devices / Roaming requirements RF audit and site survey: RF isn’t simple – every building is different Pre & post site surveys are the only way to ensure the best possible deployment Auto-channel and auto-power can’t overcome poor AP placement For voice, APs should be deployed for density (versus range) 16

17 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Requirements for VoWLAN Quality 17 Packet Prioritization Timed DeliveryAdmission Control Excellent Voice

18 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL 1. Packet Prioritization (end-to-end) Purpose Recognize high priority packets Minimize latency and ensure timely delivery Without Prioritization? All packets have equal access to the wireless network which may delay voice packets, resulting in poor audio quality 18 Background AC (BK) Best Effort AC (BE) Video AC (VI) Voice AC (VO) High Queue Low Queue

19 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL 2. Timed Delivery Purpose Provide devices with pre-determined ‘rest’ periods in order to: Conserve power ; Scan neighboring APs; Roam to better signal AP Without Timed Delivery? Devices must be awake at all times to ‘wait’ for traffic Resulting in less battery life Devices may miss packets during roaming Resulting in poor audio quality 19

20 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL 3. Admission Control Purpose Allocates available bandwidth for associated devices based on traffic requirements Avoids network saturation Without Admission Control? Access Points (AP) may become oversubscribed, resulting in poor a audio quality for all voice devices 20

21 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Standards Based QoS WMM/EDCA e EDCA Access Categories, based on standard 802.1p packet tags Voice (highest) Video Best effort Background (lowest) U-APSD Using U-APSD (Unscheduled Power Save Delivery), AP buffers traffic until device requests delivery TSPEC TSPECs sent by the device to the AP indicates bandwidth requirement AP decides to admit the device based on current traffic load 21 TimedDelivery AdmissionControl PacketPrioritization

22 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL The Avaya Difference… Real-Time Optimized Enforced QoS over wireless link Advanced Call Admission Control Beyond Industry Standards Decision matrix based on Avaya IP – provides intelligence to the gate-keeping decision Low latency & jitter Optimized Mobility Packet Flow Seamless roaming End-to-end validated 22

23 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL WLAN Packet Flow: Access Tunnels 23 WSP42 WSP12 WSP32 WSP41 WSP31 WSP11 WSP22 WSP21 Mobility Mesh (28 Tunnels) MVLANs V1, E11, E12 MVLANs V3, E31, E32 MVLANs V2, E21, E22 MVLANs Q,G AP/MU 256 ATs 128 ATs 256 ATs 128 ATs Core Router Left Phone on VLAN V1 is talking to Right Phone on VLAN V2. They are both associated to APs on Switches with direct access to their VLANs.

24 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL WLAN Packet Flow—Roaming: Mobility Tunnels 24 WSP42 WSP12 WSP32 WSP41 WSP31 WSP11 WSP22 WSP21 Mobility Mesh (28 Tunnels) MVLANs V1, E11, E12 MVLANs V3, E31, E32 MVLANs V2, E21, E22 MVLANs Q,G AP/MU 256 ATs 128 ATs 256 ATs 128 ATs Core Router Left Phone on V1 roamed to an AP connected to WSP21 that does not have direct access to V1. So WSP21 picks WSP11 to reach V1 using the MT.

25 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL WLAN Packet Flow—Resiliency: Mobility Switch Failover 25 WSP42 WSP12 WSP32 WSP41 WSP31 WSP11 WSP22 WSP21 Mobility Mesh (28 Tunnels) MVLANs V1, E11, E12 MVLANs V3, E31, E32 MVLANs V2, E21, E22 MVLANs Q,G AP/MU 256 ATs 128 ATs 256 ATs 128 ATs Core Router Priority of WSP21 for V1 is reduced. So WSP12 becomes the VLAN Server. Now WSP21 chooses the MT to WSP12 to each V1.

26 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL WLAN AP 8120 QoS Features e support with configurable EDCA parameters for AP and MU for background (BK), best-effort(BE), video(VI) and voice(VO). Unscheduled automatic power save delivery support for efficient transfer of buffered MU frames during power-save. TSPEC based call admission control to avoid contention in an access category. Client load balancing to maximize deployed capacity use. Diffserv policy for remarking DSCP values for upstream and downstream traffic. Configurable WMM-to-CoS map for deriving 802.1p priority of non-IP upstream frames. Configurable CoS-to-DSCP mapping for tunnel header prioritization of non-IP upstream frames. Configurable DSCP-to-Cos mapping and CoS-to-WMM map to derive the access category of IP and non-IP packets for downstream frames. Access tunnels and mobility tunnels end-points treated as trusted ports on WSP and incoming frames are prioritized based on DSCP/802.1p markings. 26

27 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Third Party Proven – Voice Scaling 27

28 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Handset Interoperability Avaya IP Wireless Telephones Designed to meet the business needs of both office & industrial environments Verified interoperability with leading Wi-Fi client vendors WLAN 8100 with Ascom i62 VIEW certified 28 VIEW CERTIFIED

29 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Video over Wi-Fi Complexities Variable Data Rate Data rate of transmission over Wi-Fi varies over time & distance of client to AP Variation causes throughput of individual data flows to change Presents challenge to traditional QoS – bandwidth reservation & admission control Packet Loss Greater loss with Wi-Fi than wired 29 It’s all about the experience!

30 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Different Video Types StreamingInteractiveVOD ApplicationVideo surveillance Live Digital Media Tele-presenceDesktop Collaboration Video on demand ModelMany to few (Multicast) Few to Many (Multi-cast) Client – Client (Unicast) Client – Client (Unicast) Client – Client (Unicast) Traffic3-4M per camera7-20Mbps4-12 MpsPeer-Peer typically <1M SD: 1-4 Mbps HD: 6-10 Mbps Sensitivity to QoS Requirements Latency: Medium Jitter: Medium Throughput: Medium Packet Loss: High Latency: Medium Jitter: Medium Throughput: Medium Packet Loss: High Latency: High Jitter: High Throughput: High Packet Loss: High Latency: High Jitter: High Throughput: Low Packet Loss: medium Latency: Low Jitter: Low Throughput: Medium Packet Loss: Low 30

31 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Avaya Video Enterprise Video-to-the-Desktop is the predominant video solution Unicast Bandwidth required is property of the codec used (e.g. H.264 video codec) Average Bandwidth <2Mbps All Avaya endpoints deliver video <2Mbps Radvision, Avaya 10x0 series, ADVD, Flare, One-X Communicator, Avaya Aura ® Conferencing 7 based desktop video solution Video to the Desktop & Voice have similar QoS requirements 31

32 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Third Party Proven – Video Scaling Miercom Video Scaling Test - Unicast (Video to the desktop) - 2 Mbps Streams - WLAN 8100 led the competition 32

33 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Takeaway: Industry Leading Voice & Video Certified QoS performance 31% More video call sessions 23% More VoWLAN call sessions* 33 Miercom 2011 Test Results, Avaya versus: Cisco, Juniper (Trapeze), and Aruba * a and g calls combined

34 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Agenda 1.Market Trends 2.Avaya WLAN 8100 Review 3. Supporting Voice & Video 4.Avaya Can Help You Get There 34

35 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Network Readiness Assessment 35 Pave the way for a smooth implementation Understand Current Network Configuration  Define requirements for optimizing your network Conduct Network Validation  Stimulate traffic requirements on current network  Evaluate network capacity and QoS under different conditions  Identify deviations from minimum requirements for acceptable quality Prepare for Implementation  Assess impact on applications and users  Recommend changes to resolve identified issues

36 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Avaya Professional Services Business Consulting Principals Specialize in link between technology & business goals Deep vertical industry expertise 20 years of experience on average Network Consultants Superior technical skills for design and configuration 15 years of experience on average Typical Certifications – APDS, NCDE, NCTE, CCNA/CCNP Technical Deliver Technical experts skilled in integration and deployment years of experience on average Typical Certifications – APDS, NCSS, NCTS, CCNA Program & Project Managers Specialize in on time/on budget delivery 15 years of experience on average 100% trained on PMI delivery methodology 36 Sample Certifications Experts in the APS data practice have years of experience and hold various Avaya and multi-vendor certifications

37 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Thank you! #AvayaATF

38 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Upstream QoS (MU  WSP) Example Upstream transmission of Voice traffic from MU MU acquires the medium using the station EDCA configuration parameters advertised for the Voice category. MU can transmit multiple voice packets up-to TxOP limits advertised for Voice category MU sets a TID = 6 in the frame header and marks the appropriate DSCP value in the IP header. Upstream processing on AP AP classifies the packet as WMM voice AC based on received TID = 6. AP applies any configured Diffserv policy rule in the upstream direction and if remarking is required based on match, DSCP value is updated. AP converts the frame to a MVLAN tagged frame with 802.1p priority derived from the DSCP-to-CoS map configured for the AP. AP encapsulates tagged frame in CAPWAP header and copies the DSCP value of the encapsulated IP packet into the CAPWAP header. Upstream processing between AP and WSP The data-path between AP and WSP is trusted and the DSCP priority on the CAPWAP header is honored for packet forwarding on all intermediate switches WSP also treats the access tunnel as trusted and honors the DSCP value on the tunneled packet.

39 ©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL©2013 Avaya Inc. All rights reservedFebruary 26-28, 2013 | Orlando, FL Downstream QoS (WSP  MU) WSP receives IP packet with 802.1p and DSCP value and encapsulates the tagged frame into CAPWAP tunnel header for forwarding towards AP. DSCP value of received IP packet is copied to CAPWAP header DSCP value of received IP packet may be remarked based on admin configurable rules on WSP. For non-IP packet ingress 802.1p-to-DSCP map is used to set the DSCP value on CAPWAP header. Switches/Routers between WSP and AP honor the DSCP value set on the CAPWAP header. AP extracts the tunneled tagged frame and converts the frame to frame for transmission to MU. DSCP value in the IP header can be remarked based on downstream Diffserv policy for the network. The access category for transmission of the frame on wireless medium is derived from DSCP- to-CoS table for the AP and CoS-to-WMM table for the MU’s wireless network. MU(s) packet is queued into the access category hardware queue derived from the CoS-to- WMM. (Note if the MU is in power-save mode, then packet is queued in a per-MU software queue) Radio hardware delivers the frame to the MU based on the AP EDCA parameters for the WMM access category


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