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Fortune 100 1 >80% deploying mobile clients Smartphones 289M in 2010 >900M in 2014 1 Slates 55M in 2011 >200M in 2014 1 Gartner Forecast: Mobile.

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Presentation on theme: "Fortune 100 1 >80% deploying mobile clients Smartphones 289M in 2010 >900M in 2014 1 Slates 55M in 2011 >200M in 2014 1 Gartner Forecast: Mobile."— Presentation transcript:

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6 Fortune >80% deploying mobile clients Smartphones 289M in 2010 >900M in Slates 55M in 2011 >200M in Gartner Forecast: Mobile Devices, Worldwide Gartner: Key Issues for Communications Enterprise Strategies, March 2011Key Issues for Communications Enterprise Strategies, March Gartner: Is Your Wi-Fi Network Ready for Video? May 2011Is Your Wi-Fi Network Ready for Video? May 2011 Customers starting to push towards greater media over mobile scenarios Optimize cellular minute and data plans Wireless by default, wired when necessary. 2 Network managers tasked to plan for convergence In many cases all wireless Trends are for greatly increased bandwidth usage Up to 100 personal video devices for each currently installed room system. 3

7 47% of employees use smartphones instead of desk phones for work calls (IDC report) 69% use smartphones to access business apps (IDC report) BYOD is here to stay: it improves productivity, collaboration, and cost management Fortune 100 >80% deploying mobile clients Smartphones 289M in 2010 >900M in 2014* Tablets 55M in 2011 >200M in 2014* * Gartner

8 *Gartner & IDC 2012 Fortune 100 >80% embracing BYOD* Mobile Device Growth 90% growth over next 4 years* Personal Devices on Network 4.5 B personal devices by 2015* Consumerization of IT & BYOD 80% of employees are using personal Wi-Fi enabled devices for work purposes forcing IT to embrace BYOD over WLAN Wi-Fi proliferation within the enterprises to enable mobility Wi-Fi is a key technology to enable capacity and scalability for mobile devices Reduce cellular charges BYOD are increasingly capable of rich media Employees demanding similar rich experience within the enterprise as in their personal life (Skype, Facetime, etc)

9 Challenges in Real Time Media & Wi-Fi

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11 Consistent flow of data packets Sensitive to delay, jitter and packet loss Random loss can be compensated – sequential loss is problematic Interruptions have notable effect on experience (voice) High bitrate is coming with HD video (1.5+ Mbps each way per stream)

12 Streaming vs. Real-Time Media Video playback applications like YouTube, Netflix, etc can utilize large receive side buffers in order smooth out network delays Real-Time media is interactive and requires a high performance network that can sustain continuous up/down stream traffic, with low-latency, low jitter Impact to Human Interaction Human communication starts to get negatively impacted with latency of more than 250 msec Bursty jitter or packet loss over a certain threshold cannot be recovered, and leads to glitches in the audio and video stream Especially audio (voice) glitches are very disruptive and lead to a poor user experience

13 Bandwidth requirements Audio 50 Kbps to 160 Kbps per stream (incl. IP header and error recovery overhead) Video 200 Kbps to 4 Mbps per stream – multiple concurrent video streams are possible for multiparty video conferencing Jitter Periodicity of packet 10 msec Desired jitter less than 20 msec End-to End Network Latency Desired less than 100 msec Acceptable less than 200 msec Depends on geography Packet Loss and delay Desired 0%, acceptable <2% and not more than 3 consecutive lost packets UDP vs. TCP Both UDP and TCP are supported for Real-Time Media UDP is preferred for Real-Time media – since TCP recovery (retransmits) is usually too long

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15 Background scanning mechanisms can be too long and inconsistent which affects UC real- time media traffic

16 UC real-time media sessions have very different requirements when roaming between APs then traditional data sessions Delayed handovers from sticky stations can result in multi-second media breaks for UC voice/video Stations often stick to an associated AP even when its signal strength has deteriorated so far as to be unusable. This is because many stations are not optimized for proper roaming in a multi- AP environment

17 Existing station rate adaption algorithms not well suited for UC May take up too much airtime in retries for UC real-time media traffic

18 Common Usage Scenarios

19 Colleagues are in conference room and join an online conference with others using one of their tablets over Wi-Fi Audio is first initiated and soon afterwards the conference escalates to adding in video for all parties involved. The video shows tiles of all other parties simultaneously A virtual whiteboard is next activated for all parties to collaborate The meeting last for an hour Corpnet UC

20 John takes an incoming call on his UC enabled smart phone at his desk and starts a discussion John realizes he has a meeting coming up which will take 10 minutes to walk across the building John just gets up and starts walking to his meeting while continuing on with his conversation. When John gets to his meeting he ends his call and attends his scheduled meeting. Corpnet

21 Lync Mobile Devices

22 Laptops Full Lync Client Modern UI Client Tablets Full Lync Client (X86\X64 devices) Modern UI Clients (X86\X64\ARM devices) Mobile Client (IOS\Android devices) SmartPhones Lync Mobile Client (Windows Phone 8, Android, IOS)

23 Mobile Clients codec support; RTAudio for P2P calls G711 for PSTN calls G722 for Conferencing Siren for backwards compatibility in conferencing H264 for video including hardware offloading (simulcast support for 1080P, 720P and 480P) RTVideo is added when legacy clients are connected Appsharing via Remote Desktop Protocol Clients can operate in fore- and background Automatic Reconnects to conferences when disconnected

24 Full Lync Client Max Video Resolution Send: up to 1080P in H264, 720P in RTVideo Note; a typical conference will simulcast 1080P, 240P and 180P from the same client Receive: up to 1080P Note; a client will always request the optimal stream. When in windowed mode the client will not request\receive 1080P but probably 480P or 240P. A conference can receive up to a single 1080P stream, or 5 240P streams in common scenarios Data Usage Conferencing: average 1500 kilobit/sec up to 4000 kilobit/sec P2P HD Video: average 3200 up to 4000 kilobit/sec

25 Modern Lync Client Max Video Resolution Send: up to 1080P in H264, 720P in RTVideo Note; a typical conference will simulcast 1080P, 240P and 180P from the same client Receive: up to 1080P Note; a client will always request the optimal stream. When in windowed mode the client will not request\receive 1080P but probably 480P or 240P. A conference can receive up to a single 1080P stream, or 3 240P streams in common scenarios Data Usage Conferencing: average 900 kilobit/sec up to 4000 kilobit/sec P2P HD Video: average 3200 up to 4000 kilobit/sec

26 Mobile Clients codec support; G711 for PSTN calls G722 for Conferencing Siren for P2P RTA is not supported H264 for video (hardware offload support on Phone 8 only) RTVideo only when legacy clients are connected Appsharing is only available on iPad No handover between networks (WiFi <> 3G/4G <> GSM) Clients can operate in fore- and background Video is switched off when in background mode

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28 Max Video Resolution Send: up to QVGA Receive: up to VGA (640x480) or 360p fps Battery drain time from 100% to 0%; IM + Audio (P2P) : up to 8 hours and 30 minutes IM + Video (Conf): up to 3 hours FaceTime on iPhone: up to 3 hours Data Usage IM + Video (conf): 400 kilobit / sec average

29 Max Video Resolution Send: up to QVGA Receive: up to VGA (640x480) or 360p fps With QCOM 8X60 chipset: Send: up to VGA Battery drain time from 100% to 0%; No info at this moment Data Usage IM + Video (conf) : 400 kilobit / sec average

30 Max Video Resolution Send: up to 640X480 Receive: up to 424X240 Full Hardware Offloading Battery drain time from 100% to 0%; Phone 8 on WiFi Audio : between 2 and 4 hours Phone 8 on WiFi Video : between 2 and 3 hours Phone 8 on 3G Video : between 1 and 2 hours Data Usage Video (P2P) : 450 kilobit /sec average

31 Wi-Fi Design Considerations for Real Time Media

32 Enterprise Managed Wi-Fi deployment with multiple APs Home Home router Wi-Fi AP Hotspot Single to SMB size deployment

33 Can your network handle the load? Average of 2.5 Wi-Fi enabled devices per user Multimedia UC traffic from n devices Do you have ubiquitous coverage? Networks designed for data/hotspot coverage wont deliver a good multimedia UC experience Is your network ready for BYOD? BYOD creates massive security issues Is end-to-end QoS a challenge? Networks often incorrectly tag multimedia traffic Encrypted UC traffic also needs correct Quality of Service (QoS)

34 Planning Wi-Fi only vs. mixed wired and Wi-Fi deployments Determine devices support requirement (11g/n - 11b?) Determine density - regular office space - conference room – common areas Determine workloads over Wi-Fi - Real-time media support Type of devices connected – Enterprise notebook and/or BYOD (Bring-your-own-device) Mobile device support - Powersave features Support for guests SSID and mobile device SSID QoS support (WMM for Wi-Fi)

35 Infrastructure recommendations Enterprise WLAN controller with thin enterprise grade APs or standalone APs Deploy n APs Implement WPA2 in Enterprise Mode Deploy APs featuring dual (concurrent) 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz operation with 3x3 configuration and 1 Gbps backhaul Support for RF auto radio management of channel and signal strength Fast BBS transition support – OKC Sufficient AP density for seamless coverage. Deploy applicable AP density for required coverage and capacity but keep signal levels between -45dbm to -65dbm and SNR better then 30db (40db preferred) Design for capacity based on # of clients in coverage area Plan for overlapping AP coverage (redundancy) is required Deploy in large conference rooms multiple APs Enable AP load balancing

36 Infrastructure recommendations continued 2.4 GHz band: Drop 11b support Limit 11n support to 20 MHz channels 5 GHz band: Enable band steering of dual band capable devices to 5 GHz 40 MHz channel Implement QoS/WMM with EF queue for WMM Voice Enable WMM on APs for QoS but not mandatory. Enable QoS on Lync servers and clients Ensure proper QoS on wired network with slower links Ability to classify and prioritize Lync traffic (SIP-TLS) in the presence of lower priority data traffic Enable power saving mechanisms ( Legacy or UAPSD) // recommended DTIM is 2 for voice if using legacy mode

37 Lync QoS Guidance

38 Client recommendations Enterprise class notebooks High-quality dual band NIC with at least 2x2:2 configuration Support for Radio resource management k Real-time media optimized/certified NIC and drivers Manage NIC driver versions Mobile devices supporting dual band is better BYOD is a reality so be prepared

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40 Recommendations Plan for usage and concurrently connected devices Small deployment SMB or entry level Enterprise AP/Controller Multiple APs if more than 15 concurrent users are anticipated Deploy SMB APs which support basic load balancing Typically limited to 2.4 GHz band Implement policies, such as per device bandwidth quota Block traffic for typical file sharing applications

41 DTIM interval adjustment for low- power devices Multicast support in Wi-Fi requires clients to wake up at a set interval controlled by DTIM (Delivery Traffic Indication Message) interval Shorter interval - low latency for multi-cast Longer internal – Wi-Fi radios on mobile devices can remain longer in lower power sleep mode DTIM interval is trade-off between multi-cast latency and power savings for mobile devices Example: Increase 100 msec default to 300 msec Option to configure a dedicated SSID for mobile devices

42 Lync Wi-Fi Partner Program

43 Simple & Flexible Deployment Highly Robust, Secure Wi-Fi *BYOD Security & Support Lync Qualified Wi-Fi Scales from Lync OnLine to Server 2013 Voice/Video Optimized End-to-End QoS for Encrypted Lync *BYOD Enablement Onboards Any Device Securely

44 Strategic Partnership: Better Together Microsoft partners to ensure Wi-Fi QoS for Lyncs encrypted application flows Qualification Program Stringent quality test suite to ensure that Lync traffic is handled properly over Wi-Fi without compromises to performance or security Lync Network Diagnostic API Provide visibility into call quality and diagnostics to identify the source of any problems

45 AP Infrastructure Data Only Real Time Media Fixed Real Time Media Mobile Devices Data Only Real Time Media Fixed Real Time Media Mobile

46 Ixia is the gold standard for Wi-Fi testing, with hundreds of global customers Worlds leading equipment vendors, silicon manufactures, enterprises, and service providers use Ixia for Wi-Fi product testing Ixias Professional Services Organization will provide AP qualification testing All testing will occur in Ixias lab in Santa Clara, CA Ixia will conduct all tests in accordance with Microsofts test plan Each Microsoft Partner (Vendor) will enter into an engagement with Ixia.

47 Interested in being a partner please contact Info on Wi-Fi deployment guidance documents Lync Lync Wi-Fi partner links (select networking) Interested in contacting Ixia David Frost; or Ted Duffy;

48 Demo

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50 Thank You

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