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City of Guelph Water Supply Master Plan Public Meeting #1 Presentation Tuesday March 8 th, 2005 Water Supply Master Plan.

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Presentation on theme: "City of Guelph Water Supply Master Plan Public Meeting #1 Presentation Tuesday March 8 th, 2005 Water Supply Master Plan."— Presentation transcript:

1 City of Guelph Water Supply Master Plan Public Meeting #1 Presentation Tuesday March 8 th, 2005 Water Supply Master Plan

2 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Welcome/Introduction  Opening Remarks 2

3 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Agenda TIMEDESCRIPTION 6:00 pmOpen House – Registration and Refreshments Opportunity for participants to view displays and meet informally with City staff and Consultant team 7:00 pmWelcome and Opening Remarks – City of Guelph 7:05 pmMeeting Purpose and Agenda Review – Dave Dilks, Facilitator 7:15 pmIntroduction to City of Guelph Water Supply Master Plan - John Haasen, Earth Tech 1) Overview of Master Plan and Class EA Process 2) Existing Water Supply and Sources 3) Water Supply Issues and Options for the Future A question and answer period will follow the presentation 8:00 pm Break 8:10 pmRoundtable Discussion – All Goals and Results Alternative Water Supply Options Choosing Options for the Future 8:50 pmRoundtable Highlights and Plenary Discussion 9:25 pmClosing Remarks – City of Guelph 9:30 pmAdjourn

4 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Purpose of Today’s Meeting  To introduce the City of Guelph Water Supply Master Plan project the public and stakeholders.  To identify their perspectives on key issues and opportunities associated with the WSMP.  To seek stakeholder feedback on draft problem statement; evaluation method and criteria; and “long list” of alternative solutions.

5 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Public Consultation and Communication Public consultation and communication initiatives form a key component of this project These initiatives are designed to:  Keep all stakeholders, agencies and the public informed and involved in determining how and when the City’s water supply system should be improved;  Incorporate the knowledge and insight of City of Guelph residents, stakeholders and businesses who are widely known for their interest in environmental issues and stewardship;  Exceed Class EA consultation requirements

6 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Public Advisory Committee formation & meetings  Technical agency and Municipality workshops  Public meetings  Possible stakeholder meetings  Possible focus groups with high user groups  Meetings with City and Area Councils Public Consultation

7 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Communication Plan  Advertising and Public Service Announcements  Website  Project Newsletters (3)  Communications with agencies, municipalities and stakeholders  Events Launch event Possible Water forum  Speaking engagements  Media plan

8 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Today’s Focus  Class EA Phase 1 Purpose Statement – provides an overview of the current water supply system, study background and the conclusion that improvements are required to meet current and projected future needs.  Class EA Phase 2 Alternative Solutions – identifies water supply alternatives, and evaluation framework including draft criteria and methodology.

9 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Master Plans are broad in scope. They focus on the analysis of a system, in this case water supply, for the purpose of outlining a framework for the provision of future works and development. Master Planning Process  Specific projects recommended in a Master Plan are part of a larger management system and may be distributed geographically throughout the study area. The implementation of specific projects may occur over an extended time frame.  A Class EA Master Plan must at least satisfy the requirements of Phases 1 and 2 of the Class EA process (for the most part).  Master Plan will clearly define a “suite” of projects required to implement the plan over the planning period (2054). The listing will include: Project description/location Phasing-implementation schedule (triggers) Recommended Class EA Planning Schedule (i.e. Schedule B or Schedule C or Individual EA). Each project will contain an EA component.

10 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Master Planning Process cont’d

11 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  City relies exclusively on groundwater and has utilized groundwater as its primary source of water supply since Current Water Supply System  Guelph’s water supply system includes production wells installed in the Guelph-Amabel bedrock aquifer and the Arkell Springs Ground collector system.  City has 23 production wells.  In 2004, seventeen municipal wells were operated on a near continuous basis.  The remainder were used intermittently or not at all due to needed repairs, poor water quality sampling results or were only operated as needed to address peak water demands.

12 Municipal Wells Steady State Capture Zones (2002) Source: Township of Guelph-Eramosa Groundwater Study, Gartner Lee

13 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Water Supply Master Plan provides a planning framework for development of City’s municipal water supply to accommodate future demands.  Builds on previous City water supply initiatives such as: Water Resources Evaluation (1990’s) Water Use and Awareness – Water Conservation and Efficiency Study (1998) which is already and will continue to be a major component of Water Supply Strategy Water Supply Strategy (1999)  The goal is the provision of an adequate and sustainable supply of water to meet the current and future needs of all customers. Water Supply Issues and Options

14 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Water Supply Issues and Options cont’d  October 20, 2003 Council Resolution “THAT the focus of the Water Supply Master Plan establish a sustainable water supply to regulate future growth”.  Review of demand scenarios to evaluate impacts on water supply.  Comprehensive Water Conservation/ Demand Management is a part of the current Water Supply Strategy.  Identify additional sources of water to supplement the existing supply in the 50+ year planning horizon (i.e. to at least 2054).  Developed as a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) and follows Class EA master plan provisions.

15 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Generally speaking, the existing water system is currently performing satisfactorily during average demand conditions  City still has capacity to handle the commitments for the future dwelling units currently registered or draft plan approved.  City also has additional water capacity to service near term.  Due to recent drought conditions and the provincial drought program, the system has experienced brief operational limitations due to insufficient water supply, particularly during dry summer months.  The current water supply system capacity is vulnerable to reductions as a result of climate change, degraded quality and regulatory constraints Water Supply Issues and Options cont’d

16 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Population growth estimates indicate that projected future water demands (residential and IC &I) will not be met by existing supply sources or via the continuation of water conservation/demand management initiatives.  The province’s recent “Places to Grow” Discussion Paper designated the City of Guelph as an “Urban Growth Centre”.  The City is in the process of developing a growth strategy in which water supply, wastewater, transportation, economic development and other factors are important components. Water Supply Issues and Options cont’d

17 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Water Supply Issues and Options cont’d

18 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  New regulatory requirements for water supply projects (e.g. Permit To Take Water and supporting studies) now require considerable lead time.  Future growth requirements will place additional demands on the existing water supply.  Future long-term economic growth of the City could be constrained by supply limitations.  Increased emphasis on limiting environmental impacts. Water Supply Issues and Options cont’d

19 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Guelph’s Water Demand vs Capacity

20 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Purpose Statement The City of Guelph is committed to manage population growth as it continues to develop a strategy for ensuring adequate water supply. The goal is to develop a reliable and sustainable supply of water to meet the current and future needs of all residential, industrial, commercial, and institutional customers. The existing water supply system generally meets the City's requirements, but is starting to experience difficulties in meeting peak demands. Dry summers, well interference, and water quality issues have reduced the capacity of the existing water supply system. Recent analysis confirms that the existing water supply capacity will not meet future demands. It is, therefore, prudent to carry out a study to identify strategies to increase the capacity of the City’s existing water supply. The strategies must ensure that an adequate amount of water is provided in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring environmental sustainability is not compromised. The study will also focus on innovation and will also build upon current water conservation/efficiency measures.

21 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Phase 2: Alternative Solutions Water Conservation/ Demand Management The City has already developed and implemented a comprehensive water conservation strategy that is regarded by many as a model. The City is committed to building on the success of the strategy. Continue to develop water conservation strategy such as encouraging the use of low flush toilets in existing and new developments, toilet replacement, leak detection, undertaking rehabilitation activities and accelerating the City’s unaccounted for water (UFW) program. Water use efficiency is effectively a source of water supply similar to a water supply from a municipal well. Develop Public Education Program to reinforce current and future strategies. Additional savings of 4 to 5 % may be expected from ongoing awareness programs. Reducing water use or reusing water (eg grey water used for golf course irrigation) can have the same effect as increasing water supply. Program success based on continuous monitoring as well as pricing mechanisms.

22 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Expand Existing Water Supply System Based on expanding/upgrading existing groundwater municipal water supply system and considering treatment of existing sources, innovative technologies, future requirements and current problems. To include: - Increase water takings from established sources - Equip and operate inactive wells/provide treatment - Optimize existing well capacities - Possible Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR)* Based on exploration for new groundwater sources within or outside of existing supply system. Develop additional groundwater supplies Phase 2: Alternative Solutions cont’d * ASR: Aquifer storage recovery (ASR) is a water management technology in which water is stored underground in a suitable aquifer through a well during times when the water is available, and recovered from the same well when needed. (AWWA 1996)

23 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Phase 2: Alternative Solutions cont’d Establish New Surface Water Supply – Local New Local Surface Water: - Speed River, Eramosa River, Guelph Lake

24 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Establish New Surface Water Supply - Regional New Other Surface Water Source - Great Lake Pipelines (independent or in partnership with other municipalities) Phase 2: Alternative Solutions cont’d

25 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Limit Community Growth Reduce future water supply needs by limiting the extent, density, type and/or location of future residential, industrial, commercial and institutional growth in the City below levels identified in recent planning studies. Requires change to municipal planning documents. Phase 2: Alternative Solutions cont’d

26 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Do Nothing In which no improvements or changes would be undertaken to address present and long-term water supply requirements. This would have a significant impact on the growth potential for the City would be contrary to its Regional Official Plan and Growth Management Strategy. The “Do Nothing” alternative represents what would likely occur if none of the alternative solutions were implemented. Phase 2: Alternative Solutions cont’d

27 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Draft Evaluation Criteria for Consideration  Public Health & Safety: Ability of Alternative to meet provincial water quality and security requirements.

28 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Evaluation Criteria for Consideration cont’d  Natural Environmental: Potential effects to the natural environment including siting/routing considerations and/or constraints. Potential impacts to water resources e.g. fisheries, stream base flow, aquifers, groundwater. Potential impacts to natural heritage features, including provincially significant wetlands (PSWs), environmentally significant areas (ESAs), Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSIs), and sensitive species habitat (i.e. vulnerable/threatened/ endangered or locally/regionally rare). Environmental management planning considerations including mineral resources.

29 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Evaluation Criteria for Consideration cont’d  Social Cultural Considerations: Land Use Impacts. Short-term construction related impacts including dust, traffic, access, and noise. Potential siting/routing considerations including cultural/ heritage (e.g. archaeological) and/or tourist recreational, as well as mineral resources. Potential impacts from operations including impacts to ground and surface water users.

30 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Economical/Financial Considerations: Estimated capital costs. Estimated operations and maintenance costs including cost of water and source protection. Impacts to agricultural operations and other private land owners. Evaluation Criteria for Consideration cont’d

31 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Legal/Jurisdictional Considerations: Location of facility relative to City boundaries (ie in or outside) and associated jurisdictional issues (Consideration towards Political Boundaries). Land Requirements. Ability to address outside control (independence and reliability) of City with respect to participation in decision making, rate structures and risk related to location/position on proposed water supply scheme (e.g. end of pipe). Evaluation Criteria for Consideration cont’d

32 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Evaluation Criteria for Consideration cont’d  Technical Considerations: Ability to implement alternative Ability to meet peak demands Maintaining operation during construction Minimizing disruptions/downtime Constructability Schedule and Timing Water Quality – Requirement for treatment Allowance for future treatment needs Expandability Ability to respond to change in regulatory treatment requirements/standards Ability of alternative to use existing infrastructure

33 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, Use of Descriptive Information and Qualitative Evaluation  A detailed assessment of each water supply alternative will be completed based on evaluation components and criteria.  Based on evaluations by consulting team with consideration of input received, short list alternatives will be ranked and carried forward for more detailed evaluation.  This may include a screening step that involves: primary criteria (e.g. inability to meet regulations, excessive costs, technical feasibility, unacceptable environmental or social disruption), secondary criteria (e.g. mitigable impacts such as construction truck traffic).  Suggested the evaluation not be based on a numerical ranking system.  To ensure statistical validity, such an approach would have to strictly adhere to statistical methods that are often difficult to apply.

34 Public Meeting #1 March 8 th,  Propose a descriptive or qualitative evaluation that considers the suitability of alternative solutions/strategies based on significant advantages and disadvantages.  Comparisons and trade-offs will be made between alternatives and will form rationale for the identification of the preferred solution or water supply strategy.  Trade-offs will involve forfeiting an advantage or accepting a disadvantage to address a higher priority consideration. Use of Descriptive Information and Qualitative Evaluation Least preferred Most preferred

35 Prepare Master Plan Documentation Notice of Project Initiation Notice of Completion & Public Review Notice of Completion & Public Review Present: ‐ Study Background ‐ Purpose Statement ‐ Identification of Alternative Solutions/ Strategies ‐ Evaluation Criteria/ Methodology ‐ Next Steps Input Required on: - All of the above Council Approves Master Plan Public Meeting #1 March 8 th, 2005 Ongoing Consultation as Required Initiate/ Complete Individual Projects March 2005Winter Guelph Water Supply Master Plan Schedule Notice of Public Meeting #2 Public Meeting #2 Present: ‐ Evaluation of Alternatives ‐ Recommended Strategies ‐ Project Descriptions ‐ Project Timelines/ Triggers ‐ Next Steps Input Required on: - Evaluation of Alternatives ‐ Recommended Strategies Notice of Public Meeting #1 Fall

36 Next Steps Comments received from review agencies* & the public are requested by March 22 nd, All comments received will be reviewed for consideration in the final report. Review agencies* & the public will be notified of the Master Plan Study Report & will be provided with the opportunity to comment during the Public Review Period Upon completion of the public review period (30 day duration) the Master Plan Study Report will be finalized * Review agencies include Provincial Ministries (e.g. Environment, Natural Resources, Culture), Grand River Conservation Authority, local municipal departments & utilities (hydro, gas, Bell, etc.)


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