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Rigorous Reflection: Contextualizing Classroom Events Through Deliberate Questioning and Analysis Dr. Summer A. Carrol Director, Master of Arts in Teaching.

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Presentation on theme: "Rigorous Reflection: Contextualizing Classroom Events Through Deliberate Questioning and Analysis Dr. Summer A. Carrol Director, Master of Arts in Teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rigorous Reflection: Contextualizing Classroom Events Through Deliberate Questioning and Analysis Dr. Summer A. Carrol Director, Master of Arts in Teaching Program Lenoir-Rhyne University Hickory Public Schools 2014 Curriculum Conference

2 Session Goals & Outcomes What will you do? ◦Think critically about situations in your classroom and your practice in general ◦Engage in reflective discussions with colleagues What will you gain? ◦new insights/understandings about a situation or challenge in your classroom ◦a reflective framework you can use to help improve your practice and to help other colleagues/new teachers develop their craft

3 Rigorous reflection requires mental, emotional, intellectual, and physical effort –and deliberate thinking. “Reflective practice, while often confused with reflection, is neither a solitary nor a relaxed meditative process. To the contrary, reflective practice is a challenging, demanding, and often trying process that is most successful as a collaborative effort” (p. 2, Osterman & Kottkamp, 1993)

4 Modes of Thinking Situational – considers only immediate context of situation; does not look beyond for root causes or contextual factors Deliberate – looks for information beyond immediate context in an effort to better understand a situation or dilemma Dialectical – uses information acquired from deliberate thinking to solve problems and modify practice (Grimmett et al., 1990)

5 Humility, transparency, honesty Deliberate questioning requires us to have a desire for increased awareness and to acknowledge that we may need to modify our actions and strategies in order to better impact student learning.

6 Examples of Deliberate Questioning What worked in this lesson? How do I know? What would I do the same or differently if I could reteach this lesson? Why? What root cause might be prompting or perpetuating this student behavior? What do I believe about how students learn? How does this belief influence my instruction? What data do I need to make an informed decision about this problem? Is this the most efficient way to accomplish this task? (Danielson, 2009)

7 Rigorous Reflection Process Experience a “Felt Difficulty” Identify the Teaching & Learning Context Connected to your Experience Engage in deliberate self-questioning Engage a colleague in your reflective, questioning process -Seek feedback -Consult resources Develop a Plan of Action & Try it Out!

8 Snapshot from the Classroom Think of a “felt difficulty” (challenging, disturbing, or perplexing situation) that you are currently experiencing in your classroom or that you have experienced in the past. Write about your situation by clicking here or you may use the provided handout.here or you may use the provided handout.

9 Contexts for Teaching & Learning Instructional Planning Instructional Delivery/Differentiation Classroom Environment & Management Knowledge of Content/Assessment of Student Learning Knowledge of Student/Relationships Teacher Disposition Directions: Identify the Teaching and Learning context(s)in which you feel your situation best fits.

10 Contexts for Teaching & Learning Instructional Planning Instructional Delivery/Differentiation Classroom Environment & Management Knowledge of Content/Assessment of Student Learning Knowledge of Student/Relationships Teacher Disposition Pair-N-Share: Turn to your neighbor and determine if he/she agrees with the teaching and learning context (s) you have selected. Discuss whether or not your situation might also be connected to other contexts. Adjust your choice of context, if you think it is necessary. When you have finished chatting with your partner, you are ready for the next step in the Rigorous Reflection process: Deliberate Questioning!

11 Contextualizing through Deliberate Questioning Click the “Teaching and Learning Context” connected to the situation in your “Classroom Snap Shot.” You will be taken to examples of deliberate questions associated with that Teaching and Learning Context. Choose 1-2 questions to answer and then construct AND answer at least one context-related question directly connected to the situation you are reflecting on today. Instructional Planning Instructional Delivery/Differentiation Classroom Environment & Management Knowledge of Content/Assessment of Student Learning Knowledge of Students/Relationships Teacher Disposition/Self-efficacy

12 Pair-in-Share Share some of your responses to the deliberate questions and get feedback from your partner. What types of additional questions did you determine needed answering to better understand the situation? How did you answer those questions?

13 Concluding Analysis – Quick Write What insights/new understandings have you gained about your situation as a result of today's reflective activities? What might be your next step to address the situation in your classroom? If you are not sure, what additional information do you need to begin an action plan and where might you get this information? ◦Click here to respond to this final prompt or write your response on the handout provided.Click here

14 Next Steps & Session Evaluation Continue in the reflective process: ◦Get the information you need to answer your questions (talk to colleagues, consult books, attend workshops, conduct observations, etc…)! ◦ Create an action plan and try it out in your classroom! Click here to complete the session evaluation or complete the hard-copy evaluation provided to you.

15 Thank you! Contact Information! Summer A. Carrol, Ph.D Lenoir-Rhyne University


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