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Comprise ~25 faculty and 40 graduate students from across the Schools of Architecture, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Science & Engineering, Continuing Studies,

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Presentation on theme: "Comprise ~25 faculty and 40 graduate students from across the Schools of Architecture, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Science & Engineering, Continuing Studies,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Comprise ~25 faculty and 40 graduate students from across the Schools of Architecture, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Science & Engineering, Continuing Studies, and Business A hearing panel comprises 3 graduate students (including an officer and at least one from SSE) and 2 faculty (including one officer and at least one from SSE). The Honor Code Honor Board

2 Cheating -- Giving, receiving, or using, or attempting to give, receive, or use unauthorized assistance, information, or study aids in academic work, or preventing or attempting to prevent another from using authorized assistance, information, or study aids. Consulting with any persons other than the course professor and teaching assistants regarding a take-home examination between the time the exam is distributed and the time it is submitted by the student for grading. Students should assume the exam is closed book; they may not consult books, notes, or any other reference material unless explicitly permitted to do so by the instructor of the course. 1 The Honor Code 1

3 Fabrication -- Submission of contrived or altered information in any academic exercise. False Information – Furnishing false information to any University official, instructor, or University office relating to any academic assignment or academic issue. Unauthorized collaboration -- Collaboration not explicitly allowed by the instructor to obtain credit for examinations or course assignments. Multiple submission -- Presentation of a paper or other work for credit in two distinct courses without prior approval by both instructors. 1 The Honor Code

4 Sabotage -- Destroying or damaging another student's work, or otherwise preventing such work from receiving fair graded assessment. Unfair advantage -- Any behavior disallowed by an instructor that gives an advantage over other fellow students in an academic exercise. Facilitation of academic dishonesty -- Knowingly helping or attempting to help another student violate any provision of the Code. Tampering with academic records -- Misrepresenting, tampering with, or attempting to tamper with any portion of a student's academic record. Improper disclosure -- Failure of an Honor Board member, witness or participant in an Honor Board hearing to maintain strict confidentiality concerning the identity of students accused of Honor Code violations. 1 The Honor Code

5 Plagiarism -- Unacknowledged or falsely acknowledged presentation of another person's ideas, expressions, or original research as one's own work. Such an act often gives the reader the impression that the student has written or thought something that he or she has in fact borrowed from another. Any paraphrasing or quotation must be appropriately acknowledged. Plagiarism also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. Please consult any of the available references on acknowledging sources in academic work for more information on documenting sources. 1 The Honor Code

6 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. The goal of the current study was to examine sex differences and determine the role of neonatal testosterone on prefrontal cortex-dependent impulsive choice behavior in prepubertal rats. Male and female prepubertal rats were tested on the delay-based impulsive choice task. Impulsive choice was defined as choosing an immediate small food reward over a delayed large reward. In a first experiment to examine sex differences, males made significantly more impulsive choices than did females. In a second experiment to examine the organizational effects of testosterone, females treated with neonatal testosterone made significantly more impulsive choices than did control females and their performance was indistinguishable from that of control males. In a third experiment to determine if the effect of testosterone on performance is due to the actions of androgens or estrogens through its conversion to estradiol, males treated neonatally with the aromatase inhibitor formestane, which blocks the conversion of testosterone to estradiol, females treated neonatally with the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone, and females treated neonatally with estradiol made significantly more impulsive choices than did control females and their performance was indistinguishable from that of control males. Results indicate that male pubertal rats display increased impulsive choice behavior as compared to females, that this sex difference results from organizing actions of testosterone during the neonatal period, and that this effect can result from both androgenic and estrogenic actions. 2 Examples 2 Bayless, D. W., Darling, J. S., & Daniel, J. M. (2013). Mechanisms by which neonatal testosterone exposure mediates sex differences in impulsivity in prepubertal rats. Hormones and Behavior, 64,

7 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. The goal of the current study was to examine sex differences and determine the role of neonatal testosterone on prefrontal cortex-dependent impulsive choice behavior in prepubertal rats. Male and female prepubertal rats were tested on the delay-based impulsive choice task. 2 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. I plan to examine sex differences and determine the role of neonatal testosterone on prefrontal cortex- dependent impulsive choice behavior in male and female prepubertal rats on delayed responding lever-press task. Example 1: Plan an experiment

8 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. The goal of the current study was to examine sex differences and determine the role of neonatal testosterone on prefrontal cortex-dependent impulsive choice behavior in prepubertal rats. Male and female prepubertal rats were tested on the delay-based impulsive choice task. 2 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. I plan to examine sex differences and determine the role of neonatal testosterone on prefrontal cortex- dependent impulsive choice behavior in male and female prepubertal rats on delayed responding lever-press task. Example 1: Plan an experiment

9 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. Example 1: Plan an experiment 10 results (0.80 seconds) Search Results Mechanisms by which neonatal testosterone exposure... National Center for Biotechnology Information Loading... by DW Bayless - ‎ ‎ Cited by 1 - ‎ Related articles Cited by 1 Related articles Oct 11, Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. Save to My Publications - LabRoots /user/publications/advanced-search/ipi/.../Darling+JSCachedCached LabRoots is a social networking site that enables scientists, engineers, and other technical professionals to connect, collaborate with, and learn. Biblioteka Nauki - Yadda - ICM yadda.icm.edu.pl/yadda/similarSearch/page.action?q=c_0id...CachedCached Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. The goal of the... Publications Authored by Jill M Daniel - PubFacts Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. The goal of the...

10 Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. The goal of the current study was to examine sex differences and determine the role of neonatal testosterone on prefrontal cortex-dependent impulsive choice behavior in prepubertal rats. Male and female prepubertal rats were tested on the delay-based impulsive choice task. Neonatal testosterone, either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior (Bayless et al, 2013). Either acting directly or through its conversion to estradiol, neonatal testosterone can exert organizational effects on the brain and behavior. Organization in the brain may be influenced by neonatal testosterone; presumably, testosterone may affect the brain once it is converted to estradiol (Bayless et al, 2013). Example 2: Write a paper Plagiarism? Citation? Plagiarism? Citation? Plagiarism? Citation?

11 Results indicate that male pubertal rats display increased impulsive choice behavior as compared to females, that this sex difference results from organizing actions of testosterone during the neonatal period, and that this effect can result from both androgenic and estrogenic actions. 2 Impulsive behavior in humans predicts the onset of drinking during adolescence and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adulthood. It is also possible, however, that heavy drinking may increase impulsive behavior by affecting the development of brain areas that support behavioral control or through other associated mechanisms. This study examined whether drinking heavily during adolescence is related to changes in impulsive behavior with a specific focus on how the association differs across individuals, contingent on the developmental course of their impulsiveness. 3 Example 2: Write a paper 2 Bayless, D. W., Darling, J. S., & Daniel, J. M. (2013). Mechanisms by which neonatal testosterone exposure mediates sex differences in impulsivity in prepubertal rats. Hormones and Behavior, 64, White, H. R., Marmorstein, N. R., Crews, F. T., Bates, M. E., Mun, E-Y., Loeber, R. (2011). Associations between heavy drinking and changes in impulsive behavior among adolescent boys. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35,

12 Results indicate that male pubertal rats display increased impulsive choice behavior as compared to females, that this sex difference results from organizing actions of testosterone during the neonatal period, and that this effect can result from both androgenic and estrogenic actions. Impulsive behavior in humans predicts the onset of drinking during adolescence and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adulthood. It is also possible, however, that heavy drinking may increase impulsive behavior by affecting the development of brain areas that support behavioral control or through other associated mechanisms. This study examined whether drinking heavily during adolescence is related to changes in impulsive behavior with a specific focus on how the association differs across individuals, contingent on the developmental course of their impulsiveness. Impulsive behavior in humans predicts the onset of drinking during adolescence. This may be because drinking may increase impulsive behavior by affecting the development of brain areas that support behavioral control or through other associated mechanisms. For example, male pubertal rats display increased impulsive choice behavior as a result of organizing actions of testosterone during the neonatal period (Bayless et al, 2013). It is possible that alcohol in humans acts on the same part of the brain as neonatal testosterone. Example 3: Write a paper

13 Results indicate that male pubertal rats display increased impulsive choice behavior as compared to females, that this sex difference results from organizing actions of testosterone during the neonatal period, and that this effect can result from both androgenic and estrogenic actions. Impulsive behavior in humans predicts the onset of drinking during adolescence and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adulthood. It is also possible, however, that heavy drinking may increase impulsive behavior by affecting the development of brain areas that support behavioral control or through other associated mechanisms. This study examined whether drinking heavily during adolescence is related to changes in impulsive behavior with a specific focus on how the association differs across individuals, contingent on the developmental course of their impulsiveness. Impulsive behavior in humans predicts the onset of drinking during adolescence. This may be because drinking may increase impulsive behavior by affecting the development of brain areas that support behavioral control or through other associated mechanisms. For example, male pubertal rats display increased impulsive choice behavior as a result of organizing actions of testosterone during the neonatal period (Bayless et al, 2013). It is possible that alcohol in humans acts on the same part of the brain as neonatal testosterone. Example 3: Write a paper Cutting-and- Pasting

14 “Unintentional” cutting-and-pasting near-verbatim copying is still plagiarism…and the University treats it as such Minimum consequence is reduced trust. Significant consequences include WF in the relevant course, expulsion, revocation of degree, retraction of articles. Consequences

15 Resources Academic-Conduct pdf


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