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Academic Integrity: A Guide for Instructors Presenters: Christy D. Moran, Ph.D. Assistant Dean of Students Tine Reimers, Director CETaL.

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Presentation on theme: "Academic Integrity: A Guide for Instructors Presenters: Christy D. Moran, Ph.D. Assistant Dean of Students Tine Reimers, Director CETaL."— Presentation transcript:

1 Academic Integrity: A Guide for Instructors Presenters: Christy D. Moran, Ph.D. Assistant Dean of Students Tine Reimers, Director CETaL

2 “On most campuses, over 75% of students admit to some cheating. In a 1999 survey of 2,100 students on 21 campuses across the country, about 1/3 admitted to serious test cheating and 1/2 admitted to one or more instances of serious cheating on written assignments.” Source:

3 “Most students believe that ‘cut-and-paste’ plagiarism is not a serious issue. While 10% of students admitted to engaging in such behavior in 1999, this rose to 41% in a 2001 survey…with the majority of students (68%) suggesting this was not a serious issue.” Source:

4 Academic Integrity

5 The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity Honesty: “intellectual and personal honesty in learning, teaching, research, and service” Trust: “a climate of mutual trust encourages the free exchange of ideas and enables all to reach their highest potential” Fairness: “clear standards, practices, and procedures; fairness is expected in the interactions of students, faculty, and administrators”

6 The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity (cont.) Respect: “the participatory nature of the learning process honors and respects a wide range of opinions and ideas” Responsibility: “upholds personal accountability and depends upon action in the face of wrongdoing” Source:

7 Academic Dishonesty

8 How does UTEP define cheating? Copying from a test paper of another student Engaging in communication with another student during a test Giving aid to another student during a test Possessing or using unauthorized materials during a test Using, obtaining, or attempting to obtain any non-administered test, test key, homework solution, or computer program

9 Cheating (cont.): Accessing a test bank without permission Collaborating with or seeking aid from another for an assignment without having authority to do so Substituting for another person (or vice versa) to take a test Falsifying research data, laboratory reports, and/or other academic work

10 Plagiarism

11 How does UTEP define plagiarism? The appropriation, buying, receiving as a gift, or obtaining by any means another’s work and the submission of it as one’s own Using the same work for two different assignments without appropriately citing the work

12 “This is superior work,” wrote a professor on a student’s paper. “It was excellent when Saint Thomas Aquinas wrote it, just as it is today. Saint Thomas gets an A. You get an F.” (Alschuler & Blimling, 1995, p. 123)

13 How does UTEP define collusion? Collaboration with another person to commit a violation of any provision of the rules on scholastic dishonesty

14 Adjudication of Academic Dishonesty

15 UTEP Statistics June 1, 2003 to May 31, Academic Dishonesty Cases: Cheating = 115 cases Plagiarism = 115 cases Collusion = 39 cases Other = 10 cases

16 If you suspect students of academic dishonesty during an exam: Allow them to finish the exam After the exam, objectively explain the problem as you have perceived it Project concern for the students but communicate the seriousness of the allegation Listen to the explanation of the students Refer the case to the Dean of Students office

17 If you suspect students of plagiarism: Meet with the student before or after class to discuss your concerns Do not return the paper to the student; it will need to be sent to the Dean of Students office Let the student know that you will be referring the case to the Dean of Students office

18 The first steps in the adjudication process: Send a letter to the Dean of Students office that includes the names and ID numbers for each of the students involved Include copies of the assignments or exams in question; make sure to highlight areas that are indicative of academic dishonesty Assign an “I” (Incomplete) for the assignments or exams in question until the adjudication process is complete

19 The student in question meets with the Assistant Dean of Students: The Asst. Dean determines if the student should be held responsible for the alleged violation Sometimes, the Asst. Dean may need to gather more information from the instructor before making a decision If there is not enough evidence of academic dishonesty the case is dismissed, and the student is not held responsible for a policy violation

20 What happens if the student is found responsible for academic dishonesty? The student may choose to accept the Asst. Dean’s decision, called administrative disposition, or… The student may choose to take the case to a formal hearing

21 Administrative Disposition: If the student is found responsible for academic dishonesty, the Asst. Dean makes the decision about appropriate sanctions The student may either accept or deny responsibility for violating the policy in question

22 A student may choose to have a formal hearing instead of accepting administrative disposition: A meeting is scheduled in which the student, the Asst. Dean, a faculty hearing officer, any witnesses, and/or attorneys may be present A faculty member, trained in the process, serves as the hearing officer and makes the decision about whether or not the student is responsible for violating the policy in question If the student is responsible, the faculty hearing officer determines the sanctions

23 Regardless of whether or not the student chooses administrative disposition or a formal hearing, the student has the right to appeal the final outcome to the University President. Note: If the student chooses administrative disposition, only the sanctions can be changed by the University President. In these situations, the decision regarding the student being responsible for the violation cannot be changed.

24 What are some of the sanctions that are given to students who are found responsible for academic dishonesty? “0” on the exam or assignment in question A letter grade deduction from the final course grade “F” for the course “Avoiding Plagiarism” course Ethics course Disciplinary probation Suspension Expulsion

25 The final decision is communicated by the Asst. Dean to the instructor who sent the allegation. This information should only be shared with other UTEP faculty or staff on a need-to-know basis.

26 For more information about the academic dishonesty policy at UTEP: See the Handbook of Operating Procedures: _Page_HOP.htm _Page_HOP.htm See the University of Texas System Regents Rules and Regulations: R.htm#_Toc R.htm#_Toc

27 Need more information? Visit the Dean of Students office between 8:00am and 5:00pm (Union West 102) or… Call the Dean of Students office ( )


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