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2D Drawing Representation Chapter 5. 2 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education,

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Presentation on theme: "2D Drawing Representation Chapter 5. 2 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education,"— Presentation transcript:

1 2D Drawing Representation Chapter 5

2 2 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Objectives Represent curved surfaces in multiview drawings Show intersections and tangencies of curved and planar surfaces Represent common types of holes Show fillets, rounds, and runout in a 2D drawing

3 3 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Objectives (cont.) Use partial views Apply revolution conventions when necessary for clarity Draw removed views and projected views Show right and left hand parts

4 4 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Objectives (cont.) Project curved surfaces by points Show and label an enlarged detail Show conventional breaks

5 5 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features Certain features are part of many engineering designs Learning their names and shapes helps you visualize and communicate about them

6 6 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features Fillet – a rounded interior blend between surfaces Round – a rounded exterior blend between surfaces Counterbore – a cylindrical recess around a hole, usually to receive a bolt head or nut

7 7 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features Countersink – a conical-shaped recess around a hole, often used to receive a tapered screw head Spotface – a shallow recess like a counterbore used to provide a good bearing surface for a fastener Boss – a short raised protrusion above the surface of a part

8 8 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features Lug – a flat or rounded tab protruding from a surface usually to provide a method for attachment Flange – a flattened collar or rim around a cylindrical part to allow for attachment Chamfer – an angled surface used on cylinders to make them easier to handle

9 9 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features Neck – a small groove cut around the diameter of a cylinder, often where it changes diameter Keyway/Keyseat – a shaped depression cut along the axis of a cylinder or hub to receive a key, used to attach parts to a cylinder so they won’t turn on it

10 10 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features Knurl – a pattern form on a surface to provide for better gripping or more surface area for attachment Bushing – a hollow cylinder that is often used as a protective sleeve or guide or as a bearing

11 11 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Manufactured Features

12 12 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Conventional Representations Standard orthographic projections don’t always show complex shapes as clearly and simply as you may wish Simplified conventional representations that deviate from true orthographic projection may be used to enhance economy and clarity in a drawing

13 13 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Intersections and Tangencies A plane surface can intersect or be tangent to a contoured surface When a plane intersects a contoured surface, a line is drawn to represent that edge When a plane surface is tangent to a contoured surface, no line or a thin phantom line is drawn

14 14 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Intersections and Tangencies

15 15 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Removed Views It is not always possible to show all of the drawing views in alignment on a sheet When this is the case, a removed view can be used and is indicated by: A viewing indicator arrow showing direction of sight or A viewing plane line

16 16 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Removed Views

17 17 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Intersections and Tangencies Where a curved surface is tangent to a plane surface, no line is drawn When a curved surface intersects a plane surface, an edge is formed

18 18 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Intersections and Tangencies

19 19 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Intersections of Cylinders

20 20 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Runouts Small curves called runouts are used to represent fillets that connect with plane surfaces tangent to cylinders

21 21 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Conventional Edges Because the true projection may be misleading, there is a conventional way of showing rounded and filleted edges for the sake of clarity

22 22 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Partial Views A view may not need to be complete in order to clearly describe an object If the view is symmetrical, you can draw a half-view on one side of the centerline

23 23 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Showing Enlarged Details Enlarged views may be added that show details at a larger scale

24 24 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Conventional Breaks To shorten the view of a long object, you can use break lines

25 25 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Alignment of Views Always draw views in a standard arrangement to be sure that the drawings are not misinterpreted The front view should show the shape of the object clearly

26 26 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Removed Views A removed view is a complete or partial view removed to another place on the sheet so it is no longer in direct projection with any other view Removed views show features of an object more clearly Be sure to label removed views and provide a scale if necessary

27 27 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Removed Views

28 28 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Right-hand & Left-hand Parts Often parts function in pairs of similar opposite parts The two parts are mirror images and are not interchangeable Ordinarily, you draw only one of two opposite parts and label them appropriately

29 29 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Right-hand & Left-hand Parts

30 30 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Revolution Conventions Regular multiview projections are sometimes awkward, confusing, or misleading To prevent confusion, features may be revolved to line up vertically and project true length to make symmetry clear

31 31 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Revolution Conventions

32 32 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Hole Features

33 33 Technical Drawing 13 th Edition Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart © 2009 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Common Features


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