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Ch. 8 America Secedes From the Empire Pgs. 146-155 Patriots, Loyalists, Washington, and Burgoyne.

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Presentation on theme: "Ch. 8 America Secedes From the Empire Pgs. 146-155 Patriots, Loyalists, Washington, and Burgoyne."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ch. 8 America Secedes From the Empire Pgs Patriots, Loyalists, Washington, and Burgoyne

2 The War of Independence was a war within a war, as not all colonials were united. The War of Independence was a war within a war, as not all colonials were united. There were Patriots (“Whigs”), There were Patriots (“Whigs”), Loyalists (“Tories”), Loyalists (“Tories”), And others (Moderates and “Profiteers”) And others (Moderates and “Profiteers”) During the war, the British proved that they could only control Tory areas, because when Redcoats packed up and left other areas, the rebels would regain control. During the war, the British proved that they could only control Tory areas, because when Redcoats packed up and left other areas, the rebels would regain control. Internal Division The war divided families. For example, Benjamin Franklin was against his illegitimate son, William, the last royal governor of New Jersey. The war divided families. For example, Benjamin Franklin was against his illegitimate son, William, the last royal governor of New Jersey.

3 Typical Patriot (“Whig”)  Supported rebellion  Generally the younger generation  The Patriot militias constantly harassed small British detachments. Samuel Adams  Typically didn’t belong to the Anglican Church (Church of England)  Congregational, Presbyterian, Baptist, or Methodist.  New England was the patriots’stronghold. Patrick Henry

4 Typical Loyalist (“Tory”) Often went to battle against fellow Americans Often went to battle against fellow Americans Generally conservatives Generally conservatives Most numerous where the Anglican Church was strongest (the South) Most numerous where the Anglican Church was strongest (the South) William Franklin Less numerous in New England, where Presbyterianism and Congregationalism flourished Less numerous in New England, where Presbyterianism and Congregationalism flourished More numerous in the aristocratic areas such as Charleston, SC More numerous in the aristocratic areas such as Charleston, SC Supported the king (George III)

5 Others Moderates Moderates In the middle or didn’t care either way In the middle or didn’t care either way Constantly asked to join one side or another. Constantly asked to join one side or another. “Profiteers” “Profiteers” Sold to the highest bidder, selling to the British and ignoring starving, freezing soldiers (i.e. George Washington at Valley Forge). Sold to the highest bidder, selling to the British and ignoring starving, freezing soldiers (i.e. George Washington at Valley Forge).

6 The Loyalist Exodus  After the Declaration of Independence, Loyalists and Patriots were more sharply divided, and Patriots often confiscated Loyalist property to resell it (an easy way to raise money), tarred and feathered them, made them ride astride fence rails, imprisoned them, and exiled them…….  Though it was tough on the Loyalists, at least they weren’t murdered in a mass reign of terror that would befall the French Revolution in the ensuing years.  Some 50,000 Loyalists served the British in one way or another (fighting, spying, etc…) It was odd the Brits didn’t make more use of them during the war.

7 General Washington at Bay

8 After the evacuation of Boston, the British focused on New York as a base for operations. –An awe-inspiring grand fleet appeared off the coast in July 1776, made up of some 500 ships and 35,000 men—the largest armed force seen in America until the Civil War. –Washington only mustered 18,000 ill-trained men to fight, and was routed by the British at the Battle of Long Island. Washington escaped to Manhattan Island, crossed the Hudson River to New Jersey, reaching the Delaware River with taunting, fox-hunt calling Brits on his heels………

9 –After making it across the river just in time (leaving no boats for which the British to cross), Washington re-crossed the Delaware River at Trenton on Dec. 26, 1776, and surprised and captured 1,000 Hessians sleeping off their Christmas Day celebration (drinking). –A week later, Washington left his campfires burning as a ruse, slipped away, and inflicted a sharp defeat on a smaller British detachment at Princeton, showing his military genius at its best. –The victories at Trenton and Princeton saved the revolutionary effort and inspired new confidence in America’s military. –Oddly (and fatefully) British Gen. William Howe did not crush Washington at the Delaware when he had his chance, but he remembered Bunker Hill, and was overly cautious.

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11 Burgoyne’s Blundering Invasion London officials adopted a complicated scheme for capturing the vital Hudson River valley in 1777, which, if successful, would sever New England from the rest of the colonies. The plan was such that… –General Burgoyne would push down the Lake Champlain route from Canada. –General William Howe’s troops in New York, if needed, could advance up the Hudson and meet Burgoyne in Albany. –A third and much smaller British force commanded by Col. Barry St. Leger would come in from the west by way of Lake Ontario and the Mohawk Valley.

12  However, Benedict Arnold, after failure at Quebec, retreated slowly along the St. Lawrence back to Lake Champlain, where the British would have to win control (of the lake) before proceeding. –The Brits stopped to build a huge force as Arnold gathered a ragged fleet from boats he could find. –His “navy” was destroyed, but he got valued time. Winter came and the British settled in Canada. They’d have to begin anew the next spring.  Had Arnold not contributed his daring and skill, the Brits most likely would have recaptured Ticonderoga and Burgoyne could have started from there and succeeded in his venture.  Burgoyne began his mission with 7,000 troops and a heavy baggage train made up of many officers’ wives. –Meanwhile, sneaky rebels, sensing the kill, were gathering along his flanks.

13 General Howe, at a time when he should be moving up the Hudson, purposely embarked to attack Philadelphia. He wanted to force an encounter with Washington leaving the path open for Burgoyne’s thrust. He thought he had time to help Burgoyne if needed. Washington transferred his troops to Philadelphia, but was defeated at Brandywine Creek and Germantown. The fun-loving Howe settled down in Philadelphia, leaving Burgoyne “to the dogs.” Ben Franklin joked Howe “Philadelphia had captured Howe” rather than vice-versa.

14 Washington retired for the winter at Valley Forge. His troops froze in the cold. Prussian drillmaster, Baron von Steuben, whipped the troops into shape. Burgoyne’s doomed troops were bogged down, and the rebels swarmed in with a series of sharp engagements, pushing St. Leger’s force back at Oriskany while Burgoyne, unable to advance or retreat, surrendered his entire force at The Battle of Saratoga, on October 17, –One of the most decisive battles in British and American history. –The importance of Saratoga was afterwards, France sensed America might actually win and came out to officially help America.

15 The Battle of Saratoga (1777)

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17 Revolution in Diplomacy? –Ben Franklin played the diplomacy game by wearing simple gray clothes and a coonskin cap to supposedly exemplify a raw new America  France was eager to get revenge on Britain, and secretly supplied the Americans throughout much of the war.  The Continental Congress sent delegates to France. The delegates were guided by a “Model Treaty” which sought no political or military connections, only commercial ones.

18 Britain offered the Americans a measure for home rule— everything they sought but independence. France was finally persuaded to enter the war. –Louis XVI’s ministers claimed this the best time to act, b/c if Britain regained control, she might try to capture the French West Indies for war compensation. –Now was the time to strike, rather than risk a stronger Britain with its reunited colonies. –In 1778, France offered an alliance treaty with, offering everything Britain had plus recognition of independence. –The Americans accepted the agreement with caution, since France was pro-Catholic. Since the Americans needed aid, they’d take it. After Saratoga (An Alliance With France)

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