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Developing Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas Dr. Donna McInerney, NJPSA/FEA Lead Program Developer Dr. Brian Chinni, TMI CEO/Founder Dr. Adele.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas Dr. Donna McInerney, NJPSA/FEA Lead Program Developer Dr. Brian Chinni, TMI CEO/Founder Dr. Adele."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas Dr. Donna McInerney, NJPSA/FEA Lead Program Developer Dr. Brian Chinni, TMI CEO/Founder Dr. Adele Macula, NJPSA/FEA Consultant/Progr. Dev. April 29, 2013

2 2 Desired outcomes… understand “Achieve NJ” Student Growth Objectives (SGOs) requirements; understand and apply the S.M.A.R.T.-based SGO development process; and effectively lead professional staff in the creation of standards-based, assessment-driven SGOs.

3 3 3 Activity No. 1: Let’s take our… SGO 101 Pre-Assessment!

4 4 Activity #2: Self-Reflection What do I…KNOW? What do I… WANT to KNOW? CONCERNS that I Have... NJDOE SGO Requirements SGOs: Understanding and Ability

5 5 5 Introduction to Student Growth Objectives: September January June

6 6 SLOs G

7 7 7 What is a Student Growth Objective? According to the NJDOE (2013), “Student Growth Objectives (SGOs) are academic goals for groups of students that are aligned to state standards and can be tracked using objective measures.”

8 8 8 What is a Student Growth Objective? A Student Growth Objective must be: Annual, specific and measureable Based on growth and achievement Aligned to NJ/CC curriculum standards Based on available prior student learning data A measure of what a student has learned between two points in time Ambitious and achievable A collaborative process between teacher and supervisor Approved by the principal

9 9 SGO SETTING COMPLIANCE vs. PROCESS

10 10 Compliance!…

11 11 Teacher Practice Performance on a teacher practice instrument, driven primarily through observation Stu. Growth Percentile State-calculated score that measures individual teacher’s ability to drive growth on NJ ASK NJASK Stu. Growth Objective Locally-calculated score that measures an individual teacher’s impact on stu. achievement Inputs of Effective Teaching Outcomes of Effective Teaching Summative Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice and student progress N.J.A.C. 6A: Introduction to Teacher Evaluation:

12 12 Student Growth Percentiles...for your information: All students can show growth. Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) measure how much a student has learned from one year to the next compared to peers with similar academic history from across the state. Students scored on a scale from 1 – 99. Growth baseline established by student’s prior learning as measured by all of student’s NJ ASK results. eveNJ/teacher/percentile.shtml eveNJ/teacher/percentile.shtml                                                     12

13 13 Tested Grades and Subjects (Currently grades 4-8, math and ELA): 50% from teacher practice and 50% from student achievement measures 50% Student Achievement 50% Student Achievement 50% Teacher Practice * The Department will look to incorporate other measures where possible and percentages will change as system evolves. 50% Teacher Practice

14 14 Teacher Evaluation: Introduction Teacher Practice Performance on a teacher practice instrument, driven primarily through observation Stu. Growth Objective Locally-calculated score that measures an individual teacher’s impact on stu. achievement Inputs of Effective Teaching Outcomes of Effective Teaching Summative Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice and student progress N.J.A.C. 6A: Introduction to Teacher Evaluation:

15 15 Teacher in Non-Tested Grades and Subjects: Weights will be phased in over time to move towards 50% teacher practice and 50% student achievement 50% Student Achievement 50% Teacher Practice 85% Teacher Practice 15% Student Achievement *The Department will look to incorporate other measures where possible and percentages will change as system evolves.

16 16 Teacher Evaluation: Summative Evaluation ComponentRaw ScoreWeightWeighted Score Teacher Practice Eval. Instrument 3.0X 85%2.55 Student Growth Objective3.5X 15%.525 Sum of the Weighted Scores3.075

17 17 Teacher Evaluation: Summative Evaluation ComponentRaw ScoreWeightWeighted Score Teacher Practice Eval. Instrument 3.0X 50%1.5 Student Growth Percentile2.0X 35%.70 Student Growth Objective3.5X 15%.525 Sum of the Weighted Scores2.725 This is a sample scale. The NJDOE will determine the actual scale prior to September Ineffective Partially Effective Effective Highly Effective

18 18 Principal Evaluation: Introduction New principal evaluation systems will include the following components: Principal Practice Performance on a principal practice evaluation instrument School SGP State-calc. score that measures a principal’s ability to drive growth in ELA and math Average SGO Locally-calc. score that aggregates the perf. of all teachers in a school on SGOs Admin. Goals Locally-calc. score that measures a principal’s impact on stu. achievement Summ. Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice & outcomes Eval. Leadshp. Outputs that define how well a principal is leading imp. of the eval system InputsStudent/Teacher Outcomes

19 19 Principal Evaluation: SGP and SGO Components Principals whose students have SGPs will receive the average school- wide SGP score. Principals will be placed in 3 categories: Multi-Grade SGP Principal, Non- SGP Principal, Single-Grade SGP Principal. Component weighting will differ across categories. Principals will be rated on their teachers’ success in achieving student growth objectives (SGOs) each year through an average of their teachers’ scores. School SGP SGO Average

20 20 Components Multi-Grade SGP Schools Non-SGP Schools Single Grade SGP Schools Principal Practice Instrument 30% Evaluation Leadership 20% SGO Average 10% School SGP 30%0%20% Principal Goals 10%40%20% Total Percentage 100% Inputs Student/ Teacher Outcomes

21 21 Introduction to SMART…: SGO

22 22 What does it mean to be… S M A R T ?

23 23 S.M.A.R.T. SGOs are… S…Specific M…Measurable A…Attainable/Ambitious R…Results-drive T…Timed

24 24 S.M.A.R.T. SGOs are… SpecificMeasurableAttainable/ Ambitious Results- driven Timed The SGO should be simplistically written, and clearly defined. The SGO should be measurable and provide tangible evidence that you have achieved the objective. The SGO should be attainable; reasonably challenging both you and your students, but clearly defined so that it can be achieved. The SGO should focus on measuring outcomes, not activities. The SGO should be organized around a timeframe that presents a reasonable sense of urgency.

25 25 Activity No. 3 S M A R T

26 26 TYPES OF SGOs Type of SGODefinition GeneralFocused on the teacher’s entire student population for a given course. Includes a large proportion of curriculum standards General – Tiered Same as above, but with student goals tiered by student preparation levels. Specific – Student Group Focused on a subgroup of students that needs specific support. Student – Content/Skill Focused on specific skills or content that students must master.

27 27 TYPE: General SGO – Elementary Literacy SGO Statement: 80% of students increase at least one proficiency level on the Text Reading and Comprehension (TRC) assessment. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… 4321 *90% of more students met goal. *80% or more students met goal. *70 or more students me their goal *Less than70% of students me their goal *These numbers will be determined by teacher and principal based on knowledge of students to create a rigorous and attainable goal

28 28 TYPE: General SGO – 6 th Grade Music SGO Statement: 80% of students will master 7 of 9 skills measured by the district-developed 6 th grade music rubric. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… % or more students met goal. 80% or more students met goal. 70% or more students met their goal Less than70% of students me their goal Teachers can also use rubrics or portfolio assessments to measure student attainment. In this example the district created a rubric for 6th grade music teachers to measure attainment of certain skills.

29 29 TYPE: Tiered General SGO – Physics 1 SGO Statement: 75% students will meet their designated target scores on the Physics 1 post assessment. Preparedness GroupNo. of Students in GroupTarget Score on PA (%) Low36/6570 Medium21/6580 High8/6590 Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… 4321 Low85% or more students in the tier met goal. 75% or more students in the tier met goal. 65% or more students in tier met goal. Less than 65% of students in tier met goal. Medium High

30 30 TYPE: Specific/Targeted Students – Gr. 8 ELA SGO Statement: 6/8 students who scored in the low range on the pre-assessment will increase 10 words/minute over their baseline score on the Oral Reading Fluency Assessment. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… students met goal 5-6 students met goal. 3-4 students met goal 0-2 students met goal. For some teachers there may be a specific student group that is appropriate to target. In this instance, the teacher identified a group of students with low preparedness who he believed would benefit from increased work in reading fluency.

31 31 TYPE: Specific/Targeted Content/Skill- History SGO Statement: 80% of students will score a “3” or better on the district DBQ assessment for using evidence to support a point of view. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… % or more students met goal. 80% or more students met goal. 70 or more students met their goal Less than70% of students me their goal Teachers can also use rubrics or portfolio assessments to measure student attainment. In this example the district created a rubric for U.S. History students to measure attainment of specific critical thinking skills.

32 32 The SGO Development Process STUDENT GROWTH OBJECTIVES PROCESS PREPARE SGO SCORE SGO RESULTS DEVELOP SGO IMPLEMENT AND MONITOR SGO SGO SUBMISSION & APPROVAL MID-YEAR SGO REVIEW PRE-APPROVAL STAGE EVIDENCE COLLECTION FOCUSED STRATEGIES SGO REVIEW and EDUCATOR SGO SCORE

33 33 PREPARE SGO KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS  Review student data  Identify student population  Target specific and enduring academic concepts, skills or behaviors from Standards  Address observable student need(s)  Identify evidence sources to measure student growth  Establish goals for student growth  Which students are being addressed?  What is being taught?  Which content standards are being targeted?  Does the content selected represent essential knowledge and skills that will endure beyond a single test date, be of value in other disciplines, and/or necessary for the next level instruction?

34 34 DEVELOP SGO KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Understand SMART Goal design Practice writing SMART Goals Determine the rationale for SGO Decide if the SGO will be “progress” and/or “achievement” focused Decide if…General or General-tiered? Specific to a group of students? Specific in content or skill? Determine and write the SGO(s) Why choose this learning content, evidence or target? What source(s) of data did you examine in selecting the SGO(s)? What is the starting level of learning for students in the class? What strengths and weaknesses were identified? Is the SGO(s) rigorous and measurable? What is the target level of growth or performance that students will demonstrate? Do I expect all students to make the same amount of growth, regardless of where they start from, or should I set differentiated goals?

35 35 IMPLEMENT and MONITOR: Focused Strategies KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Determine strategies and supports. Consider evidence-based and differentiated strategies aligned to district and school initiatives, content- based best practices, and grade level expectations Determine the plan for the actions to be implemented throughout the implementation timeframe Plan for the documentation of the strategies Consider the availability of supplemental supports to further strategies Does the SGO(s) provide a clear focus for instruction and assessment? Do the strategies meet the students’ needs and align with learning styles? Are the strategies consistent with district, school and programmatic best practices? What is the plan for documenting student progress and monitoring student growth? Is the implementation plan rigorous? Structured?

36 36 IMPLEMENT and MONITOR: Evidence Collection KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Monitor student progress Collect data toward meeting SGO(s) Administer end-of-term assessment, formal post-test, etc. or review rubric-based portfolio/performance assessments Collect final results regarding student growth using the evidence source(s) identified In this final collection of evidence, the educator will note the percentage of targeted population that did not meet, met, and exceeded their student growth targets. What assessments(s), student work product(s), or other evidence sources will be used to measure whether students met the objective? Assessment types? How are the results reported? Accessibility to assessment results ? Is the assessment valid and reliable? Why is this the best evidence for determining whether students met the objective? What are the trends in the data?

37 37 SCORE SGO RESULTS KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Review SGO(s) results and scores Educator will report the percentage of targeted population that did not meet, met, and exceeded their student growth targets Submit final results of SGO(s) to principal/supervisor Administrator and educator collaboratively determine educator’s score based on set criteria Final SGO score for educator is included as part of summative evaluation What is the expected outcome (target) by the end of the instructional period? Did the students meet the expected goals of the SGO(s)? What were the final results of the SGO? Achieved? Not Achieved? What score did the educator achieve? Was there a summative evaluation conference to discuss the accomplishment of the SGO(s)?

38 38 SGO SUBMISSION FOR APPROVAL (11/15/13) CONSIDERATIONS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Based upon the educators role/position, 1-2 SGO(s) will be set and the most appropriate assessment measure will be utilized to determine if the target is met or not The educator will submit the draft SGO(s) to his/her principal/supervisor for approval. The administrator will review each SGO and ensure that they meet the established criteria The SGO(s) will then be approved or will be returned for further revision, with specific directions as to which component(s) need revising A mid-year meeting between the educator and the principal/supervisor is recommended Conference is scheduled at approximately the halfway point of the specified SGO interval A review of progress, a discussion of any issues, and adjustments to the SGO growth target may be made upon mutual agreement in situations where the goals are either too rigorous or not rigorous enough SGO MID-YEAR REVIEW (2/15/14)

39 39 SeptemberBy Nov. 15*By Feb. 15 By end of academic cycle 1. Prepare: Identify areas of need; choose or develop quality assessment aligned to standards 3. Submit for Approval 5. Mid-point Review: Adjustments to SGO can be made with approval 2. Develop: Establish students’ starting points & goals for growth; identify instructional strategies 4. Implement & Monitor: Implement identified strategies; collect evidence through ongoing assessment; monitor student progress; refine instruction 6. Review results & score: Administer post-assessment; review results & score * SGO PROCESS TIMELINE

40 40 Assessment: The “Heart” of the SGO? SGO Activity No. 4: Assessment

41 41 SGO Checklist HERE

42 42 Suggested Guidelines for Assessment Creation (NJDOE, 2013, p. 11) Develop assessments collaboratively. Align all assessments with NJCCCS or CCSS. Align all assessments with district, school and department goals. Make sure all the content in your SGO is covered in the assessment. Incorporate test items that vary in levels of difficulty. Include a sufficient number of test items to ensure rigor. Collaboratively determine possible modifications to meet the needs of students. Develop rubrics to assess essay responses. Make sure content- and skill-based rubrics are specific and address multiple levels of proficiency.

43 43 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: All Things Considered! Just released!

44 44 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Context (Note: Adapted from: Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE). Retrieved March 12, 2013 from: FA-VisualArts.pdf) FA-VisualArts.pdf

45 45 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Learning Content/Competencies

46 46 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Evidence

47 47 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Baseline Data

48 48 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Timeline

49 49 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: SGO Statement

50 50 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Instructional Action Plan

51 51 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Student Performance Targets and Self-Evaluation Student Performance Targets and Self-Evaluation of SGO Achievement: How will you define instructional success? Describe what you consider to be fair and reasonably challenging student and personal performance targets. The SGO score will represent 15% of your formal Summative Evaluation. Student Performance Targets and Scoring Highly Effective (4) Effective (3) Partially Effective (2) Ineffective (1) 100% students score a Level 3 or higher on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric; 90% or more students increase 2 or more levels. 100% students score a Level 3 or higher on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric. 80% or more students score a Level 3 on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric. Less than 80% students score a Level 3 on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric.

52 52 Introducing the SGO Blueprint: Rationale

53 53 Introducing the TMI SGO Blueprint: Rationale

54 54

55 55 smart.tmieducation.com

56 56 smart.tmieducation.com

57 57 smart.tmieducation.com

58 58 smart.tmieducation.com

59 59 What do I…KNOW? What do I… WANT to KNOW? CONCERNS that I Have... NJDOE SGO Requirements SGOs: Understanding and Ability Self-Reflection Revisited…What do we still NEED to KNOW?

60 60 Time for Lunch!

61 61 Data-Driven SGOs Activity No. 5

62 62 STUDENT PRE-ASSESSMENT DATA Tim7 Sanji17 Barb18 Sam20 Shawn21 Janelle22 Sara24 Jorge25 Michael27 Joe33 Bill33 Mickey34 Trevor34 John43 Jaylen43 Sally43 Jorge44 Jennifer45 Alan46 Shannon65 CLASS SIZE20 students AVERAGE32.2 RANGE pt spread

63 63 Creating Your SGO Blueprint! Just released!

64 64 Principal as Instructional Leader: Guiding the SGO Conversation

65 65 Is there a viable curriculum in place that is standards- based and connected to daily instruction? What assessment data is available? What does the assessment data tell us about our students? Are additional assessments needed? If so, can these be procured or will teachers need to collaboratively create them? Are the assessments aligned to the standards? PREPARE SGO

66 66 Are the pre-assessments, formative assessments and post- assessments aligned? Are PLCs/teams established and working effectively to analyze student data and identify areas of student need? PREPARE SGO

67 67 What student learning objectives will be the basis of my SGO? What kind of SGO will I develop? Progress and/or achievement? General or General-tiered? Specific – student group? Specific- content/skill? If PLCs/teams have identified an area of student need, have individual teachers developed growth goals specifically for their students? DEVELOP SGO

68 68 Are PLCs/teams established and working effectively to identify the most effective teaching and learning strategies to maximize student achievement and meet the SGO? Do teachers and/or PLCs/teams need targeted professional development regarding specific strategies or the diverse needs of learners? DEVELOP SGO

69 69 Is student assessment data shared among colleagues so that the needs of students can be more effectively met? Are PLCs/teams collaboratively reflecting on and revising teaching and learning strategies and instructional resources in response to analysis of assessment data? IMPLEMENT and MONITOR the SGO

70 70 Wrap It Up! Concluding Points Precious Cargo… SGO Inside!

71 71 Next Steps… SGO

72 72 Our SINCERE THANKS… For your participation, collaboration and dedicated efforts!!! Donna, Adele, and Brian


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