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Developing Standards-Based, Assessment-Driven Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas 1 Summer 2013.

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1 Developing Standards-Based, Assessment-Driven Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas 1 Summer 2013

2 Online Discussion Site Go to: http://todaysmeet.com/ http://todaysmeet.com/ Room Name Post questions, share information, etc. Room will remain “open” until _______________. Use it after the workshop to continue discussion.

3 DAY 1 ---Today’s Agenda A. Introduction & Overview 1.Introduce Today’s Meet 2.Overview of AchieveNJ Evaluation System 3.Activity #1 – KWL Chart 4.Activity #2 – Pre Assessment Quiz 5.Compliance vs. Process 6.AchieveNJ/Teach NJ Requirements 7.SGO Template Components B. SGO Basics 1.What is a SMART student growth objective? 2.Achievement and Growth Goals B. SGO Basics (continued) 3.Activity #3 - Analysis & Evaluation of SGO Sample Goals 4.NJDOE Teacher SGO Attainment Levels 5.4 Types of SGOs with samples BREAK (15 minutes) C. SGO Development Process & Timeline 1.Introduce/Review SGO process development steps & timelines D. Introduce SGO Template E. Revisit KWL Self-Reflection LUNCH (1 hour) Morning Session 3

4 Day 1 ---Today’s Agenda Assessment Literacy 1. Activity 4a: Survey of Assessment Practices 2.Linking Assessment in the Classroom with Student Growth & Achievement 3. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge 4. Creating Classroom Assessments 5. Types of Assessments 6. Alignment: Assessments & Standards 7. Rigor & Depth of Knowledge 8. Choosing or Developing Quality Assessments 9.Instructional Connections: Data-driven Instruction; Differentiated Instruction; Feedback for Students 10.Activity #4b: What Assessments are Utilized in Your School for Measuring Learner Progress? 11.Activity #4c: Considerations When Choosing or Developing a Quality Assessment BREAK: (15 minutes) Afternoon Session G. SGO Design Template Review 1.Intro to SGO template 2.SGO Blueprint - Walk-through sample SGO H. Data Analysis & Considerations in Setting SGOs 1.Activity #5a: Building a SMART SGO Mr. Smith – Science Pre-Assessment Data I. Concluding Activity 1.Day 1 Feedback Form 2.Reminders: Items to Bring for Day 2 DISMISSAL 4

5 1.Understand Student Growth Objective (SGO) requirements. 2.Understand and apply the SMART-based SGO development process. 3.Effectively lead professional staff in the creation of standards-based, assessment-driven SGOs. Desired Outcomes 5

6 FOR DAY 2 Bring with you… Resources Standards (CCSS and NJCCCS) Curriculum Guides Grade Level Course Syllabi School Plans School Improvement Plan Consolidated Plan (Title 1) District Assessments Quarterly and Benchmark Tests Performance Assessments Portfolio Rubrics Data School Specific Data Historical Test Data Test Specifications Data from District Assessments Paper or online ! 6 Bring Back Day 1 Guide!

7 A CTIVITY #1 What do I…KNOW?What do I… WANT to KNOW? CONCERNS that I HAVE... NJDOE SGO Requirements SGOs: Understanding and Ability Self-Reflection 7

8 8 Let’s take our… SGO 101 Pre-assessment! Activity #2: 8

9 9 Introduction to Student Growth Objectives September January June 9

10 SLOs G In New Jersey… 10

11 11 What is a Student Growth Objective? According to the NJDOE (2013): “Student Growth Objectives (SGOs) are academic goals for groups of students that are aligned to state standards and can be tracked using objective measures.” 11

12 12 What is a Student Growth Objective? A Student Growth Objective must be: Annual, specific and measureable Based on growth and achievement Aligned to NJ/CC curriculum standards Based on available prior student learning data A measure of what a student has learned between two points in time Ambitious and achievable A collaborative process between teacher and supervisor Approved by the principal http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf 12

13 COMPLIANCE PROCESS vs. SGO SETTING: “THE CONTEXT” 13

14 SGO SETTING: PROCESS 14

15 SGO DESIGN TEMPLATE 15

16 C OMPLIANCE ! SGO SETTING 16

17 Teacher Practice Performance on a teacher practice instrument, driven primarily through observation Stu. Growth Percentile State-calculated score that measures individual teacher’s ability to drive growth on NJ ASK NJASK Stu. Growth Objective Locally-calculated score that measures an individual teacher’s impact on stu. achievement Inputs of Effective Teaching Outcomes of Effective Teaching Summative Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice and student progress N.J.A.C. 6A:10-4.1 Introduction to Teacher Evaluation Teachers in Tested Grades 4-8 17

18 Student Growth Percentiles (SGPs)… FYI All students can show growth. Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) measure how much a student has learned from one year to the next compared to peers with similar academic history from across the state. Students scored on a scale from 1 – 99. Growth baseline established by student’s prior learning as measured by all of student’s NJ ASK results. 18                                                     http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/ teacher/percentile.shtml For More Information…NJDOE SGP video 18

19 Tested Grades and Subjects (Currently grades 4-8, math and ELA): 55% from teacher practice and 45% from student achievement measures * The NJDOE will look to incorporate other measures where possible and percentages may change as system evolves. Teachers in Tested Grades 19

20 Teacher Evaluation: Introduction Teacher Practice Performance on a teacher practice instrument, driven primarily through observation Stu. Growth Objective Locally-calculated score that measures an individual teacher’s impact on stu. achievement Inputs of Effective Teaching Outcomes of Effective Teaching Summative Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice and student progress N.J.A.C. 6A:10-4.1 Introduction to Teacher Evaluation Teachers in Non-Tested Grades/Areas 20

21 Non-Tested Grades and Subjects: Student Achievement will be 15% in SY 13-14. Teacher Practice will be 85%. *The Department will look to incorporate other measures where possible and percentages will change as system evolves. Teachers in Non-Tested Grades/Subjects 21

22 Teacher Evaluation: Summative Evaluation Non-Tested Grades and Subjects ComponentRaw ScoreWeightWeighted Score Teacher Practice Eval. Instrument 3.0X 85%2.55 Student Growth Objectives (2) 3.5X 15%.525 Sum of the Weighted Scores3.075 22

23 Teacher Evaluation: Summative Evaluation Tested Grades and Subjects 23

24 Principal Evaluation: Introduction New evaluation systems for Principals will include the following components: Principal Practice Performance on a principal practice evaluation instrument School SGP State-calc. score that measures a principal’s ability to drive growth in ELA and math Average SGO Locally-calc. score that aggregates the perf. of all teachers in a school on SGOs Admin. Goals Locally-calc. score that measures a principal’s impact on stu. achievement Summ. Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice & outcomes Eval. Leadshp. Outputs that define how well a principal is leading imp. of the eval system InputsStudent/Teacher Outcomes 24

25 Principal Evaluation: SGP and SGO Components Principals whose students have SGPs will receive the average school-wide SGP score. Principals will be placed in 3 categories: Multi-Grade SGP Principal, Non-SGP Principal, Single-Grade SGP Principal. Component weighting will differ across categories. Principals will be rated on their teachers’ success in achieving student growth objectives (SGOs) each year through an average of their teachers’ scores. School SGP SGO Average 25

26 Components Multi-Grade SGP Schools Non-SGP Schools Single Grade SGP Schools Principal Practice Instrument 30% Evaluation Leadership 20% SGO Average 10% School SGP 30%0%20% Principal Goals 10%40%20% Total Percentage 100% Inputs Student/ Teacher Outcomes Principal Evaluation: A Look at All Components 26

27 P ROCESS ! SGO SETTING 27

28 Introduction to SMART SGO 28

29 What does it mean to be… S M A R T ? 29

30 SMART SGO S ARE … S …Specific M …Measurable A …Attainable/Ambitious R …Results-driven T …Timed 30

31 SMART SGO S ARE … SpecificMeasurableAttainable/ Ambitious Results- driven Timed The SGO should be simplistically written, and clearly defined. The SGO should focus on a specific content area or skill. The SGO should be measurable and provide tangible evidence that you have achieved the objective. The SGO should be attainable; reasonably challenging both you and your students, but clearly defined so that it can be achieved. The SGO should focus on measuring outcomes, not activities. The SGO should be organized around a timeframe that presents a reasonable sense of urgency. 31

32 Growth vs. Achievement Goals GROWTHACHIEVEMENT Students’ post- assessment scores will be ___% greater than the pre- assessment. On the post- assessment, ___% of students will achieve a score of ___ or higher. SGOs can be growth and/or achievement goals. 32

33 IS THIS SGO.... During the 2013-14 school year, Language Arts students will improve their accuracy, fluency and comprehension. SMARTSMART During the 2013-14 school year, all of my 3 rd grade Language Arts students will demonstrate measurable progress in the reading skills of accuracy, fluency and comprehension. All students will achieve at least 1 year’s gain as measured by the Star Reading Enterprise Assessment. Students in the below grade level band will attain at least 1.2 year’s gain. 33

34 S M A R T ACTIVITY #3 34

35 TYPES OF SGO S Type of SGODefinition GeneralFocused on the teacher’s entire student population for a given course. Includes a large proportion of curriculum standards General – Tiered Same as above, but with student goals tiered by student preparation levels. Specific – Student Group Focused on a subgroup of students that needs specific support. Specific– Content/Skill Focused on specific skills or content that students must master. 35

36 T EACHER ATTAINMENT OF SGO S Source: http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf 36

37 TYPE: G ENERAL SGO SGO Statement: 80% of students increase at least one proficiency level on the Text Reading and Comprehension (TRC) assessment. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… 4 Exceptional 3 Full 2 Partial 1 Insufficient *90% or more students met goal. *80% or more students met goal. *70 or more students met their goal. *Less than 70% of students met their goal. *These numbers will be determined by teacher and principal based on knowledge of students to create a rigorous and attainable goal. ELEMENTARY LITERACY 37

38 TYPE: G ENERAL SGO SGO Statement: 80% of students will master 7 of 9 skills measured by the district- developed 6 th grade music rubric. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… 4 Exceptional 3 Full 2 Partial 1 Insufficient *90% or more students met goal. *80% or more students met goal. *70% or more students met their goal. *Less than 70% of students met their goal. *Teachers can also use rubrics or portfolio assessments to measure student attainment. In this example the district created a rubric for 6th grade music teachers to measure attainment of certain skills. GRADE 6 MUSIC 38

39 TYPE: T IERED G ENERAL SGO SGO Statement: 75% students will meet their designated target scores on the Physics 1 post assessment. Preparedness GroupNo. of Students in GroupTarget Score on PA (%) Low36/6570 Medium21/6580 High8/6590 PHYSICS 1 39

40 TYPE: G ENERAL SGO Using the full attainment score range as a starting point, you can assign ranges to the other attainment standards as shown below. For consistency, 14% ranges are used in the “partial” category. Scoring Plan Objective Attainment Based on Percent and Number of Students Achieving Target Target Exceptional (4) Full (3)Partial (2)Insufficient (1) Score 80% on assessment ≥85% students (56 or more) ≥70% students (range 84-70%) (45 or more) ≥55% students (range 69-55%) (36 or more) <55% students (fewer than 36) Using the data from the tiered sample, 24 students in the high and middle tiers scored at or above 80%. If only 10 student in the low tier scored at or above 80%, this teacher would only receive a Insufficient rating. SGO Statement: At least 75% of my 65 students will score 80% or above on the end of course test.

41 T IERED SGO S CORING P LAN AND W EIGHTED S CORE Scoring Plan Preparedness groups Target Score on Final Assessment Objective Attainment Based on Percent (and Number ) of Students Achieving Target Scores Exceptional 4 Full 3Partial 2Insufficient 1 Low70>85% (31-36)>70% (25-30)>55% (18-24)<55% (0-17) Medium80>85% (19-21)>70% (15-18)>55% (11-14)<55% (0-10) High90>85% (8)>70% (6-7)>55% (4-5)<55% (0-3) Results of SGO Preparedness groups Number of Students in Group Weight (Number of students in group/total students) Number of Students Reaching Target Scores Objective attainment Level Weighted score Low36/650.562730.56x3 = 2.24 Medium21/650.322040.32x4 = 0.96 High8/650.12420.12x2 = 0.24 Total SGO Score3.25

42 TYPE: S PECIFIC /T ARGETED S TUDENTS SGO Statement: 6/8 students who scored in the low range on the pre-assessment will increase 10 words/minute over their baseline score on the Oral Reading Fluency Assessment. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… 4 Exceptional 3 Full 2 Partial 1 Insufficient 7-8 students met goal 6 students met goal. 3-5 students met goal 0-2 students met goal. For some teachers there may be a specific student group that is appropriate to target. In this instance, the teacher identified a group of students with low preparedness who he believed would benefit from increased work in reading fluency. GRADE 8 LAL 42

43 TYPE: S PECIFIC /T ARGETED C ONTENT /S KILL SGO Statement: 80% of students will score a “3” or better on the district DBQ assessment for using evidence to support a point of view. Measuring Progress For a teacher to earn a rating of… 4 Exceptional 3 Full 2 Partial 1 Insufficient 90% or more students met goal. 80% or more students met goal. 70 or more students met their goal Less than70% of students me their goal Teachers can also use rubrics or portfolio assessments to measure student attainment. In this example the district created a rubric for U.S. History students to measure attainment of specific critical thinking skills. HISTORY 43

44 The SGO Development Process STUDENT GROWTH OBJECTIVES PROCESS PREPARE SGO SCORE SGO RESULTS DEVELOP SGO IMPLEMENT AND MONITOR SGO SGO SUBMISSION & APPROVAL MID-YEAR SGO REVIEW PRE-APPROVAL STAGE EVIDENCE COLLECTION FOCUSED STRATEGIES SGO REVIEW and EDUCATOR SGO SCORE 44

45 PREPARE SGO KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS  Review student data  Identify student population  Target specific and enduring academic concepts, skills or behaviors from Standards  Address observable student need(s)  Identify evidence sources to measure student growth  Establish goals for student growth  Which students are being addressed?  What is being taught?  Which content standards are being targeted?  Does the content selected represent essential knowledge and skills that will endure beyond a single test date, be of value in other disciplines, and/or necessary for the next level instruction? 45

46 DEVELOP SGO KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Understand SMART Goal design Practice writing SMART Goals Determine the rationale for SGO Decide if the SGO will be “progress” and/or “achievement” focused Decide if…General or General- tiered? Specific to a group of students? Specific in content or skill? Determine and write the SGO(s) Why choose this learning content, evidence or target? What source(s) of data did you examine in selecting the SGO(s)? What is the starting level of learning for students in the class? What strengths and weaknesses were identified? Is the SGO(s) rigorous and measurable? What is the target level of growth or performance that students will demonstrate? Do I expect all students to make the same amount of growth, regardless of where they start from, or should I set differentiated goals? 46

47 IMPLEMENT and MONITOR SGO Focused Strategies IMPLEMENT and MONITOR SGO Focused Strategies KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Determine strategies and supports. Consider evidence-based and differentiated strategies aligned to district and school initiatives, content-based best practices, and grade level expectations Determine the plan for the actions to be implemented throughout the implementation timeframe Plan for the documentation of the strategies Consider the availability of supplemental supports to further strategies Does the SGO(s) provide a clear focus for instruction and assessment? Do the strategies meet the students’ needs and align with learning styles? Are the strategies consistent with district, school and programmatic best practices? What is the plan for documenting student progress and monitoring student growth? Is the implementation plan rigorous? Structured? 47

48 IMPLEMENT and MONITOR SGO Evidence Collection KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Monitor student progress Collect data toward meeting SGO(s) Administer end-of-term assessment, formal post-test, etc. or review rubric- based portfolio/performance assessments Collect final results regarding student growth using the evidence source(s) identified In this final collection of evidence, the educator will note the percentage of targeted population that did not meet, met, and exceeded their student growth targets. What assessments(s), student work product(s), or other evidence sources will be used to measure whether students met the objective? Assessment types? How are the results reported? Accessibility to assessment results ? Is the assessment valid and reliable? Why is this the best evidence for determining whether students met the objective? What are the trends in the data? 48

49 SCORE SGO RESULTS KEY TASKS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Review SGO(s) results and scores Educator will report the percentage of targeted population that did not meet, met, and exceeded their student growth targets Submit final results of SGO(s) to principal/supervisor A teacher’s supervisor and/or a member of the School Improvement Panel will calculate a rating for the SGOs (required by NJDOE). Final SGO score for educator is included as part of summative evaluation What is the expected outcome (target) by the end of the instructional period? Did the students meet the expected goals of the SGO(s)? What were the final results of the SGO? Achieved? Not Achieved? What score did the educator achieve? Was there a summative evaluation conference to discuss the accomplishment of the SGO(s)? 49

50 SGO SUBMISSION FOR APPROVAL (by 11/15/13) CONSIDERATIONS Based upon the educators role/position, 1-2 SGO(s) will be set and the most appropriate assessment measure will be utilized to determine if the target is met or not The educator will submit the draft SGO(s) to his/her principal/supervisor for approval. The administrator will review each SGO and ensure that they meet the established criteria The SGO(s) will then be approved or will be returned for further revision, with specific directions as to which component(s) need revising A mid-year meeting between the educator and the principal/supervisor is recommended Conference is scheduled at approximately the halfway point of the specified SGO interval A review of progress, a discussion of any issues, and adjustments to the SGO growth target may be made upon mutual agreement in situations where the goals are either too rigorous or not rigorous enough SGO MID-YEAR REVIEW (by 2/15/14) IMPORTANT DATES 50

51 SGO PROCESS TIMELINE 51

52 What do I…KNOW?What do I… WANT to KNOW? CONCERNS that I Have... NJDOE SGO Requirements SGOs: Understanding and Ability W HAT DO WE STILL NEED TO KNOW? Self-Reflection Revisited… 52

53 ASSESSMENT SGO Activity # 4a: Survey of Assessment Practices The “Heart” of the SGO 53

54 Linking Assessment In the Classroom with Student Growth and Achievement 54

55 WHERE ASSESSMENT COUNTS! Consider Formative Assessment! Consider Summative Assessment! 55

56 W HAT DO HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEACHERS DO ?  Major reviews of the research on the effects of classroom assessment indicate that it might be one of the most powerful tools in a teacher's toolbox.  Marzano 56

57 Identify students’ strengths and weaknesses Monitor student learning and progress Plan and conduct instruction Classroom Assessment Helps Teachers Provides the MEANS to GATHER EVIDENCE about what students know and can do 57

58 Ongoing Informal and Formal Classroom Assessment Is the bond that holds teaching and learning together Allows educators to monitor teaching effectiveness and student learning Can motivate and shape learning and instruction Can help teachers gauge student mastery of required skills Can help teachers determine whether students are prepared for tests that are used for high-stakes decisions Can help students improve their own performances http://www.ets.org/Media/Tests/TOEFL_Institutional_Testing_Program/ELLM2002.pdf 58

59 How We Communicate Results How We Assess What We Assess What Is Worth Learning How It Should Be Learned How Well We Expect Students to Perform Linking assessment and instruction is critical to effective learning. ASSESSMENT INSTRUCTION and STUDENT LEARNING 59

60 Good Evidence Improves Instruction Keep learning goals in mind Consider assessment strategies Determine what would constitute evidence that students have reached the learning goals 60 123

61 Assessment OF/FOR Learning Traditionally, we have used assessments to measure how much our students have learned up to a particular point in time. This is called "assessment of learning" — or what we use to see whether our students are meeting standards set by the state, the district, or the classroom teacher. These summative assessments are conducted after a unit or certain time period to determine how much learning has taken place. Although assessments of learning are important if we are to ascribe grades to students and provide accountability, teachers should also focus more on assessment for learning. This type of assessment — formative assessment — supports learning during the learning process. 61

62 FORMATIVE or SUMMATIVE? FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT is part of the instructional process. When incorporated into classroom practice, provides information needed to adjust teaching and learning while they are happening.  Informs both teachers and students about student understanding at a point when timely adjustments can be made.  Help to ensure students achieve, targeted standards-based learning goals within a set time frame. SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS are given periodically to determine at a particular point in time what students know and do not know.  State assessments  District benchmark or interim assessments  End-of-unit or chapter tests  End-of-term or semester exams  Scores that are used for accountability for schools (AYP) and students (report card grades). 62

63 InFORMATIVE Assessment "Informative assessment isn't an end in itself, but the beginning of better instruction." Carol Ann Tomlinson 63

64 Activity - Brainstorm with Others FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS 64

65 Examples Observations Questioning Discussion Journals Assignments Projects Pop Quizzes (not-graded) Exit/Admit Slips Learning/Response Logs Graphic Organizers Peer/Self Assessments Written Questions / Exercises with Short, Extended or Multiple-choice Answers Practice Presentations Diagnostic Tests Visual Representations Kinesthetic Assessments Individual Whiteboards Four Corners Think Pair Share Appointment Clock Simulations/Business Games Conferencing/Reviews Meaningful Homework Assignments http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/ExamplesofFormativeAssessment.html FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS 65

66 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge 66

67 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge 67

68 Don’t Forget About the Students 68

69 Don’t Forget About the Students Formative assessments:  serve as practice for students…shouldn’t be “graded”  check for understanding along the way and guide teacher decision making about future instruction  provide feedback to students so they can improve their performance  help teachers differentiate instruction and thus improve student achievement. “The student's role is to strive to understand what success looks like and to use each assessment to try to understand how to do better the next time.” Rick Stiggins, Educational consultant 69

70 Accurate How is this student evolving as a learner? What can I do to assist this learner on his path to mastery? Does the assessment test the material that I taught in the lessons? Does the assessment test the knowledge and skills/abilities related to my grade level? Content area? Is the assessment related to the essential questions of the unit of study? Appropriate Does the assessment design match the types of knowledge being assessed? Does the performance tasks relate to the conceptual understandings of the unit? Relevant Does the assessment match the goals of the unit? Lesson? Will the student(s) be able to successfully accomplish the assessment? Does the assessment provide me with evidence of student growth? Student achievement? Creating Classroom Assessments 70

71 S UGGESTED G UIDELINES : A SSESSMENT C REATION (NJDOE - 2013) http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf Develop assessments collaboratively. Align all assessments with NJCCCS or CCSS. Align all assessments with district, school and department goals. Make sure all the content in your SGO is covered in the assessment. Incorporate test items that vary in levels of difficulty. Include a sufficient number of test items to ensure rigor. Collaboratively determine possible modifications to meet the needs of students. Develop rubrics to assess essay responses. Make sure content- and skill-based rubrics are specific and address multiple levels of proficiency. 71

72 SGO C HECKLIST HERE 72

73 Resources from NJDOE SGO Guidebook (2013), pg. 26 73

74 NJDOE SGO Guidebook, 2013 – pg. 27 74

75 NJDOE SGO Guidebook, 2013 – pg. 27 75

76  Common formative assessments for learning can do for classroom teachers what large-scale assessments of learning, by design, cannot.  These are assessments collaboratively designed by a grade-level or department team that are administered to students by each participating teacher periodically throughout the year.  They assess student understanding of the particular standards that the grade- level or department educators are currently focusing on in their individual instructional programs.  The teachers collaboratively score the assessments, analyze the results, and discuss ways to achieve improvements in student learning on the next common assessment they will administer. In this way, assessment informs instruction.  If the common formative assessments are aligned to the large-scale assessments in terms of what students will need to know and be able to do on those assessments, the formative assessment results will provide valuable information regarding what students already know and what they need to learn. These assessments thus offer “predictive value” as to the results students are likely to produce on the large-scale assessments. Provided with this feedback early, educators can adjust instruction to better prepare students for success on the large-scale assessments. 76

77 Corrective Instruction For assessments to become an integral part of the instructional process, teachers need to change their approach in three important ways. They must: 1)use assessments as sources of information for both students and teachers 2)follow assessments with high-quality corrective instruction, and 3)give students second chances to demonstrate success. Thomas R. Guskey 2007 77

78 Students Data Planning for Curriculum and Instruction Instruction Data-Driven Instruction + Which instructional strategies work best for these students? How do I manage a classroom with a wide range of readiness levels, learning styles and interests? What have the students learned? How do I manage student data? What patterns do the data show? How do I align curriculum with assessments? Differentiation Planning for All Students… Struggling Students, ELL Students, Accelerated Students 78

79 Instructional Strategies Differentiating Instruction In Response to Formative Assessments 79

80 ContentProduct Process Learning Environment Based on Individual Learner Differentiated Instruction: The Core of Instructional Practices Teachers can differentiate through 4 ways: Carol Ann Tomlinson (as cited by Ellis, Gable, Greg, & Rock, 2008, p. 32) 80

81 Assessment Introduction Teaching Strategies Learning Activities Grouping Strategies Resources Extension Activities Modification (Ascending Levels of Intellectual Demand) Products Content 10 Components of a Comprehensive Curriculum Unit, Lesson, or Task Tomlinson, C.A., Kaplan, S. N., Renzulli, J. S., Purcell, J. H., Leppien, J. H., Burns, D. E., Strickland, C. A., Imbeau, M. B., (2009). The Parallel Curriculum Model. (2 nd ed.).Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. 81

82 FEEDBACK From the student's point of view, the formative assessment "script" reads like this: What knowledge or skills do I aim to develop? How close am I now? What do I need to do next? Good feedback contains information that a student can use, which means that the student has to be able to hear and understand it. 82

83 ... our greatest opportunity for better schools: a simple, unswerving focus on those actions and arrangements that ensure effective, ever-improving instruction. Instruction itself has the largest influence on achievement. Mike Schmoker, Results Now (2006) 83

84 Activity #4b: What Assessments are Utilized in Your School for Measuring Learner Progress? Complete the chart on Pages 31-32. and/or Activity #4c: Considerations When Choosing or Developing a Quality Assessment Complete the chart on Page 36. ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY 84

85 I NTRODUCING THE SGO T EMPLATE : A LL T HINGS C ONSIDERED ! 85

86 SGO DESIGN TEMPLATE 86

87 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : C ONTEXT Context: Describe the student population being served by your SGO. In addition, offer any information related to special learning circumstances that you believe to be important. 20 Visual Arts-3 students 2 students have delayed fine motor skills 3 Special Needs (other) 2 ELL 5 504 2 Academic Enrichment (Note: Adapted from: Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE). Retrieved March 12, 2013 from: http://www.ride.ri.gov/EducatorQuality/EducatorEvaluation/SLO_Exemplars/Elem_FA- VisualArts.pdf)http://www.ride.ri.gov/EducatorQuality/EducatorEvaluation/SLO_Exemplars/Elem_FA- VisualArts.pdf 87

88 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : T IMELINE Timeline: Describe the instructional time interval. Interval of Instruction: All students receive instruction once per week, for 40 minutes, throughout the year, as part of an Expressive Arts Cycle program. 88

89 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : L EARNING C ONTENT /C OMPETENCIES Learning Content and Competencies: Describe the specific content, concepts, and/or topics around which the SGO will be organized and measured. RI Visual Arts (3-4) and Design Standard 1 Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts: a.describing and applying basic VAD concepts: line, shape, form, texture, color, organization of visual compositions, emphasis/focal point, pattern, balance/ symmetry, and contrast b.applying basic strategies and techniques to address artistic problems c.using observation to develop a visual representation of basic objects d.maintaining a portfolio of self-created art work and explaining art concepts learned 89

90 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : E VIDENCE Evidence Considered: Describe all state-, district- and classroom-level assessments, that can be considered to support baseline data analysis. At the end of last year I examined this cohort’s portfolios with the K-2 art teacher. This showed that while students were working with line, color, and shape, and pattern, they were not obviously constructing composition, relating parts to the whole, developing attention to detail, or mixing representational and expressive techniques. 90

91 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : B ASELINE D ATA Baseline Data: Describe the specific pre-assessment(s) that you utilized to establish an understanding of current student performance. Appropriately organize and present the student performance data that was used to influence your SGO performance targets. Visual Arts-3 Benchmark-I Assessment I Administered BA-I during the first week of class. Students are asked to draw a self-portrait from memory; then, using individual mirrors, students do an observation of their face and draw a self-portrait with paper and pencil. Students are asked to reflect on the choices they made regarding concept and technique, and explain those choices verbally. Through this assessment I am able to determine which techniques students relied on utilizing in their art, which they were comfortable using in descriptive speech, and how they articulated their process and choices. Results (out of 6 possible): Level 4– 4; Level 3 – 6; Level 2– 8; and Level 1- 2 91

92 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : SGO S TATEMENT SGO Statement: In careful consideration of the information provided in the sections above, present your SMART Student Growth Objective (SGO). For the 2013-2014 Visual Arts-3 Cycle Program, 100% of my 20 students will demonstrate measurable progress in their ability to create portraits from observation in a variety of mediums (including drawing with oil pastels, printmaking, collage, and painting) that show evidence of problem solving using basic visual arts concepts (including visual composition, color, shape, as well as a mixture of representational and expressive techniques), as aligned to State Grade 3-4 VA Standards 1 and 3. In careful consideration of student K-2 Portfolios, related artifacts and evaluative instruments, as well as individual performance data generated from my Visual Arts-3 Benchmark-I Assessment, all students will score at least a Level 3 (out of 6) on the 6-point VA-3 Rubric. 92

93 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : I NSTRUCTIONAL A CTION P LAN Instructional Action Plan: Describe key strategies intended to influence student growth during the defined timeline. Instructional Strategy Evidence of Impact Timeline Regular practice with different mediums Product/RubricWeeks 4-7 Creation & analysis of portrait collection JournalWeeks 12-16 Observation & self-portraits Portfolio/RubricWeeks 23-30 93

94 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : S TUDENT P ERFORMANCE T ARGETS AND S ELF -E VALUATION Student Performance Targets and Self-Evaluation of SGO Achievement: How will you define instructional success? Describe what you consider to be fair and reasonably challenging student and personal performance targets. The SGO score will represent 15% of your formal Summative Evaluation. Student Performance Targets and Scoring Highly Effective (4) Effective (3) Partially Effective (2) Ineffective (1) 100% students score a Level 3 or higher on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric; 90% or more students increase 2 or more levels. 100% students score a Level 3 or higher on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric. 80% or more students score a Level 3 on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric. Less than 80% students score a Level 3 on the 6- point VA-3 Rubric. 94

95 I NTRODUCING THE SGO B LUEPRINT : R ATIONALE Rationale: Describe what you believe makes your SGO SMART, and feasible and worthy of implementation. At this grade level students should expand the ways they draw and know that there is more than one way to depict figures. As the art teacher for grades 3-5, I work closely with the K-2 art teacher. In 2nd grade students begin to develop exposure to drawing from observation, but this is the first year this skill is explicitly discussed along with the differences of drawing from memory. In the past, learning how to look carefully at a subject has been a real challenge for students but drawing from observation is a crucial skill and students are often eager to develop their ability. It is developmentally appropriate for students to hone their ability to make conscious choices utilizing media, concepts and technique to represent the observable world. It is also critical that students become more mindful of how these choices affect their artwork and can describe these choices verbally. Students will be exposed to new mediums, including oil pastels and printmaking, whereas in the earlier grades they mainly utilized other drawing materials, cut paper, and paint. This expands their opportunity to make choices in their artwork and experiment with technique. 95

96 D ATA -D RIVEN SGO S Activity #5a: Building an SGO 96

97 Assessment at a Glance COURSE: Life Science– Grade 10 Science STANDARDS: LIFE SCIENCE – NJCCCS Standards: STANDARD 5.3: All students will understand that life science principles are powerful conceptual tools for making sense of the complexity, diversity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Order in natural systems arises in accordance with rules that govern the physical world, and the order of natural systems can be modeled and predicted through the use of mathematics. STRANDS: A. Organization and Development B. Matter and Energy Transformations C. Interdependence D. Heredity and Reproduction E. Evolution and Diversity ASSESSMENT CONSTRUCT: TYPE: Pre-Assessment TIME FRAME: 45 minutes/1 class period/5 days week QUESTION TYPES:MC: 19CR: 6ER:PT: 1 Mrs. Smith’s Class 97

98 STUDENT PRE-ASSESSMENT DATA Tim 7 Sanji 17 Barb 18 Sam20 Shawn21 Janelle22 Sara24 Jorge 25 Michael27 Joe33 Bill33 Mickey34 Trevor 34 John43 Jaylen43 Sally43 Jose44 Jennifer45 Alan46 Shannon 65 CLASS SIZE20 students AVERAGE32.2 RANGE 17 - 46 29pt spread 98

99 REMINDER Bring with you… Resources Standards (CCSS and NJCCCS) Curriculum Guides Grade Level Course Syllabi School Plans School Improvement Plan Consolidated Plan (Title 1) District Assessments Quarterly and Benchmark Tests Performance Assessments Portfolio Rubrics Data School Specific Data Historical Test Data Test Specifications Data from District Assessments Paper or online ! 99 Bring Back Day 1 Guide!

100 D AY 1 -R EFLECTION & F EEDBACK Pages 61-62 Participant’s Guide 100

101 Developing Standards-Based, Assessment-Driven Student Growth Objectives in ALL Content Areas Day 2 101

102 DAY 2 ---Today’s Agenda A. Introductory Activity 1.Welcome 2.Truth or Confusion Activity B. Data Considerations in Developing SGOs 1.Activity #5b: Building a SMART SGO Mr. Adams – Grade 2 Literacy BREAK (15 minutes) C. Working Together to Develop SGOs: School-Content- and Grade Level Team-Based 1.Activity #6 - Strategic SGO Planning: Creating a SMART SGO LUNCH (1 hour) Morning Session 102

103 Day 2 ---Today’s Agenda E.Carousel/Gallery Walk- SGO Statements 1.Debrief/Groups Report Out- Examples from each content area shared with group BREAK (15 minutes) BREAK-OUT SESSIONS Afternoon Session INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF MEMBERS Peer Review of Completed SGOs Activity #7: Next Steps Closing Activity Feedback Form Dismissal ADMINISTRATORS Principal Evaluation & the NJ State Practice Instrument for Evaluating Leadership Activity: Evaluating an SGO Activity: 4 Scenarios Next Steps Feedback Form Dismissal 103

104 L ET ’ S R EVIEW ! TRUTH OR CONFUSION? 104

105 SGOs are required for both teachers of tested and non-tested subjects. 105 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

106 TRUE Teachers of tested subjects who have an SGP will develop one SGO. Teachers of non-tested subjects will write 2 SGOs. 106

107 An SGO must be linked to New Jersey’s curriculum standards. 107 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

108 TRUE The process of setting SGOs requires the creation of standards-aligned goals and assessments. 108

109 The teacher makes the final determination about the SGO. 109 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

110 CONFUSION! The building principal provides final SGO approval. SGOs are part of each teacher’s evaluation. All principals’ evaluations include the school’s SGO average. 110

111 The “A” in SMART goals stands for activities. SMART goals focus on the number of differentiated classroom activities that a teacher provides. 111 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

112 CONFUSION! The SGO should focus on measuring outcomes NOT activities. (The “A” represents Attainable/ Ambitious!) 112

113 SGOs can be growth and/or achievement goals. 113 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

114 TRUE SGOs may be growth goals or achievement goals or a combination of both. 114

115 A general SGO goal must focus on a teacher’s entire student population and a large proportion of curriculum standards and must set one general expectation for all students. 115 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

116 CONFUSION! There are two types of General SGOs – General and General- Tiered. The General-Tiered SGO tiers student goals by student preparation levels; hence, different expectations are set for different groupings of students. 116

117 There are 2 types of Specific SGOs: Specific – Student Group = focusing on subgroup of student with specific needs. Specific – Content/Skill = focusing on specific skills of content that students must master. 117 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

118 TRUE NJDOE recommends that teachers who must develop 2 SGOs write one General SGO and one Specific SGO. 118

119 Teacher attainment of SGOs will be based on a four point scale. Teachers who fully attain their Student Growth Objective will earn 3 points. 119 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

120 TRUE A teacher who has fully attained the SGO has “demonstrated a considerable impact on learning by meeting the objective” and will be awarded 3 points via a 4 point scale. 120

121 Formative Assessment provides information to adjust teaching and learning while they are happening. Summative Assessment determines at a point in time what students know and do not know. Summative Assessments are graded. 121 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

122 TRUE Formative Assessment is assessment for learning! Summative Assessment is assessment of learning! 122

123 The collaborative development of common assessments by teachers is a valid and professional practice. 123 “TRUTH” OR “CONFUSION”?

124 TRUE Teachers via their PLC, grade level or department may collaboratively develop and score formative assessments to measure student understanding of particular standards. 124

125 D ATA -D RIVEN SGO S Activity #5b: Building an SGO 125

126 TYPE: T IERED G ENERAL SGO SGO Statement: 75% students will meet their designated target scores on the Physics 1 post assessment. Preparedness GroupNo. of Students in GroupTarget Score on PA (%) Low36/6570 Medium21/6580 High8/6590 PHYSICS 1 126

127 TYPE: G ENERAL SGO Using the full attainment score range as a starting point, you can assign ranges to the other attainment standards as shown below. For consistency, 14% ranges are used in the “partial” category. Scoring Plan Objective Attainment Based on Percent and Number of Students Achieving Target Target Exceptional (4) Full (3)Partial (2)Insufficient (1) Score 80% on assessment ≥85% students (56 or more) ≥70% students (range 84-70%) (45 or more) ≥55% students (range 69-55%) (36 or more) <55% students (fewer than 36) Using the data from the tiered sample, 24 students in the high and middle tiers scored at or above 80%. If only 10 student in the low tier scored at or above 80%, this teacher would only receive a Insufficient rating. SGO Statement: At least 75% of my 65 students will score 80% or above on the end of course test.

128 T IERED SGO S CORING P LAN AND W EIGHTED S CORE Scoring Plan Preparedness groups Target Score on Final Assessment Objective Attainment Based on Percent (and Number ) of Students Achieving Target Scores Exceptional 4 Full 3Partial 2Insufficient 1 Low70>85% (31-36)>70% (25-30)>55% (19-24)<55% (0-18) Medium80>85% (19-21)>70% (15-18)>55% (11-14)<55% (0-10) High90>85% (8)>70% (6-7)>55% (4-5)<55% (0-3) Results of SGO Preparedness groups Number of Students in Group Weight (Number of students in group/total students) Number of Students Reaching Target Scores Objective attainment Level Weighted score Low36/650.562730.56x3 = 2.24 Medium21/650.322040.32x4 = 0.96 High8/650.12420.12x2 = 0.24 Total SGO Score3.25

129 Assessment at a Glance DRAGrade 2 Teacher: Adams Pre-assessment: Week of 9.15.12 Student DRA Points Earned Guided Reading Level Comments Anai10F ELL Angie24L Antonio4C ELL Ashley4C Christopher28M Cristian16I ELL Davis4C Denisse24L Elvira18J Emely10F Francisco28M Freddy8E ELL Geraldine8E Jamie28M Jaymen6D ELL Jonathan18J Katherine24L Kerem24L Malachi28M Michael3C Noel C.4C Randy12G enrolled /assessed 10.22 Stefani R.24L ELL Stephanie H.4C Tiffany14H 129

130 Strategic SGO Planning ACTIVITY #6 130

131 SGO DESIGN TEMPLATE 131

132 N EXT S TEPS … SGO Review content area samples from NJDOE and other districts/ states. 132

133 G UIDING THE SGO C ONVERSATION Activity #7 – Strategic District and School Planning 133

134 Placeholder Adele’s slide 134

135 Table Talk: District and School Planning 135

136 B REAKOUT SESSIONS 136

137 Instructional Staff Breakout Session BREAKOUT SESSION 137

138 N EXT S TEPS … W RITING Y OUR O WN SGO S SGO Review content area samples from NJDOE and other districts/ states. Write your own SGOs. 138

139 W RAP I T U P ! C ONCLUDING P OINTS Precious Cargo… SGO Inside! 139

140 Please complete the Feedback Form:  Reflect  Jot  Turn in 140

141 Administrator Breakout Session BREAKOUT SESSION 141

142 Revisiting Compliance: Principal Evaluation 142

143 Principal Evaluation: Introduction New evaluation systems for Principals will include the following components: Principal Practice Performance on a principal practice evaluation instrument School SGP State-calc. score that measures a principal’s ability to drive growth in ELA and math Average SGO Locally-calc. score that aggregates the perf. of all teachers in a school on SGOs Admin. Goals Locally-calc. score that measures a principal’s impact on stu. achievement Summ. Rating Overall eval. score that combines the multiple measures of practice & outcomes Eval. Leadshp. Outputs that define how well a principal is leading imp. of the eval system InputsStudent/Teacher Outcomes 143

144 Principal Evaluation: SGP and SGO Components Principals whose students have SGPs will receive the average school-wide SGP score. Principals will be placed in 3 categories: Multi-Grade SGP Principal, Non-SGP Principal, Single-Grade SGP Principal. Component weighting will differ across categories. Principals will be rated on their teachers’ success in achieving student growth objectives (SGOs) each year through an average of their teachers’ scores. School SGP SGO Average 144

145 Components Multi-Grade SGP Schools Non-SGP Schools Single Grade SGP Schools Principal Practice Instrument 30% Evaluation Leadership 20% SGO Average 10% School SGP 30%0%20% Principal Goals 10%40%20% Total Percentage 100% Inputs Student/ Teacher Outcomes Principal Evaluation: A Look at All Components 145

146 146

147 147

148 Components Multi-Grade SGP Schools Non-SGP Schools Single Grade SGP Schools Principal Practice Instrument 30% Evaluation Leadership 20% SGO Average 10% School SGP 30%0%20% Principal Goals 10%40%20% Total Percentage 100% Inputs Student/ Teacher Outcomes Principal Evaluation: A Look at All Components 148

149 T EACHER ATTAINMENT OF SGO S Source: http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/SGOGuidebook.pdf NJDOE SGO Performance Bands 149

150 Evaluating the SGO! ELA SGO Analysis 150

151 Principal Scenarios: Potential Challenges 151

152 Principal Scenario No. 1: Fairness and Equity At Top Notch Elementary School, teachers of grades K-3, teachers of special subject areas (art, music, etc.) and special education teachers with fewer than 20 students will set two SGO’s per State regulation. The superintendent determined that for consistency teachers of grades 4-5 will set two SGO’s as well. The 4 th and 5 th grade teachers are very upset because they already receive an additional measure of student achievement in the SGP score which is tied to their students’ performance on the NJ ASK. What’s a principal to do? 152

153 Principal Scenario No. 2: District v. School-based Decision The superintendent of Prestige Public School District has designed and mandated a 4 point SGO scoring plan for all teachers that sets very high expectations. Two of the district’s elementary schools have won National Blue Ribbon School designations. You are the principal of the third elementary school. Your school’s NJ ASK scores are historically lower. Seventy percent (70%) of your students qualify for free and reduced lunch. Fifty five percent (55%) are in the ELL program. Your annual student mobility rate is thirty three percent (33%). Your teachers are furious. They claim these expectations are unrealistic. What’s a principal to do? Target ScoreExceptional (4)Full (3)Partial (2)Insufficient (1) % of Students Meeting Target 100-9594-8988-8382-77 153

154 Principal Scenario No. 3: Ethics A group of high school teachers appears to be especially anxious about their students’ performance on SGO’s. They want to: 1.Set low SGO student expectations with limited rigor, 2.Address an area of apparent strength in their SGO objective, 3.Score their own students’ pre and post tests, 4.Report data via a small random sampling that they will control. The principal is suspicious of the value, validity and integrity of their SGO plan. What’s a principal to do? 154

155 Principal Scenario No. 4: Accountability You are the principal, the sole building-based administrator, in a school with 640 students and 77 teachers. You understand the SGO process and know that your own evaluation will incorporate your school’s SGO performance. You are apprehensive that you will not have enough time to oversee the SGO development, monitoring and outcome evaluation processes. What’s a principal to do? 155

156 Next Steps: School and District SGO Planning Table Talk: District and School Planning 156

157 W RAP I T U P ! C ONCLUDING P OINTS Precious Cargo… SGO Inside! 157

158 Please complete the Feedback Form:  Reflect  Jot  Turn in 158

159 Thank you for your participation, collaboration and dedicated efforts!!! Wishing you much professional success as you continue your work in developing and implementing Student Growth Objectives. 159


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