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Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) “No Child Left Behind” Act of 2001 Public Law 107-110 (NCLB) Brian Jeffries Office of Superintendent of.

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Presentation on theme: "Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) “No Child Left Behind” Act of 2001 Public Law 107-110 (NCLB) Brian Jeffries Office of Superintendent of."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) “No Child Left Behind” Act of 2001 Public Law (NCLB) Brian Jeffries Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

3 Key Principles of NCLB Increased Accountability Scientifically Based Research and Proven Practices Flexibility Parent Knowledge, Choice, Involvement

4 Major Points Assessment for All Students Accountability for All Schools Highly Qualified Personnel Public Reporting Dollars to the Classroom

5 Purpose of Education Reform “… to provide students with the opportunity to become responsible citizens, to contribute to their own economic well-being, and to that of their families and communities, and to enjoy productive and satisfying lives.” - Basic Education Act (Goal)

6 H.R. 1 – No Child Left Behind Act State Testing Requirements Beginning School Year Annual testing in one grade within three levels; 3-5, 6-9 and in reading and mathematics Beginning School Year Annual English proficiency assessment for all LEP students Beginning School Year Participation in NAEP required in grades 4 and 8 in reading and mathematics Beginning School Year 2005 – 2006 Annual testing in Grades 3-8 in reading and mathematics (and HS year; 10 th ) Beginning School Year 2007 – 2008 Annual testing in one grade within three levels, 3-5, 6-9, and in science Additional Indicators Required Graduation rate for secondary, state selects elementary/middle indicator(s)

7 Alternate Assessments States must measure all student performance against the state’s standards “Developmentally appropriate” testing allowed Special Education students are currently assessed using: –WASL –WASL with Accommodations –Portfolio Alternate Assessment 1 on WASL = Below Basic1 on WAAS = Below Basic 2 on WASL = Basic2 on WAAS = Basic 3 on WASL = Proficient3 on WAAS = Proficient 4 on WASL = Advanced4 on WAAS = Advanced 1% limitation allowed to count toward proficiency alternate (WA: 2003:.2% : 1%)

8 ALL students “proficient” by 2014 Separate, measurable goals in reading and mathematics -- State Uniform Bars Separate, measurable objectives/disaggregated data and goals for: All Children Racial/Ethnic Groups Students from Low-Income Families Students with Disabilities (Special Education) Students with Limited English Proficiency (ELL) NCLB Adequate Yearly Progress Elements

9 Other NCLB AYP Elements Must include at least one other indicator: –Graduation rates, for high schools –Attendance for elementary/middle schools 95% of students in each group must be tested School is making AYP if there is a 10 percent reduction in each group not reaching proficiency -- “Safe Harbor” Determination of “personally identifiable” and “statistically reliable” number(s) –Personally identifiable = 10 –Statistical reliable = 30

10 Full Academic Year Requirement Full academic year = October 1 st –all students whose enrollment is continuous and uninterrupted on or before October 1 st in the school year through the date the assessment is administered Beginning Fall 2003 Determines which students are to be included in decisions about Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Applies To: –Enrolled Full Academic Year in School –Enrolled Full Academic Year in District –Enrolled Full Academic Year in State

11 Other Indicator: Elementary/Middle Schools (Gr. 1-8) Attendance – Definition of an unexcused absence: Failure to meet the district’s policy for excused absences – RCW 28A defines unexcused absence: Failure to attend the majority of hours or periods in an average school day or failure to comply with a more restrictive school district’s policy for excused absences. The rate for AYP purposes is calculated as follows: Total number of student days of unexcused absences in the year Average monthly headcount X number of student days in the SY – AYP will be met if a school/district attains an unexcused absence rate of 1 percent or less. Schools/districts with unexcused absence rates greater than 1 percent must show a reduction from the prior year to meet AYP.

12 Other Indicator: High Schools (Gr. 9-12) Calculation of the Graduation Rate –Cohort begins at the beginning of Grade 9 Identify “Expected Year of Graduation” (i.e., after 4 years) The expected graduation year may be reassigned under the following conditions: Transfers into district after grade 9 IEP Team exception decisions no later than age 16 –Washington State will also calculate an “Extended Cohort Analysis ” Students who successfully obtain a diploma after their graduation year will be “added” to the cohort graduation rate for reporting purposes. High Schools, districts, and the state annual graduation rate goal = 73% Graduation goal for 2014 = 85% To make AYP if the rate is below 73%, it must increase by 1% point compared to the previous year. The graduation rate applies to the entire school and district, not to the student subgroups.

13 “Multiple Hurdles”  All schools will have a “multiple hurdle” model in which they need to make AYP in all areas to be considered on schedule.  Must have 95% participation rate to meet AYP.

14 Faces of our students

15  A l l S t u d e n t s  N a t i v e A m e r i c a n  A s i a n  B l a c k  W h i t e  H i s p a n i c  S t u d e n t s w i t h D i s a b i l i t i e s  L o w - I n c o m e S t u d e n t s EE L L GROUPS DISTINGUISHED to Determine AYP Hurdles  Each group must have 95% participation rate to meet AYP.

16 ReadingReading Math AYP is determined by making it over all 18 hurdles (9 hurdles for reading and 9 for math) by disaggregation of data. AYP is determined by making it over all 18 hurdles (9 hurdles for reading and 9 for math) by disaggregation of data. AYP is determined by making it over all 18 hurdles (9 hurdles for reading and 9 for math) by disaggregation of data. All Students All Students Native American Native American Asian Black White Hispanic Students with Disabilities Students with Disabilities Low Income Low Income ELL

17 Disaggregated Data Forces a “Closer Look”

18 Percent Proficient Reading Math Percent Participation Reading Math Unexcused Absence/ Graduation Rate All Students Native American Asian/Pac. Is. Black Hispanic White Special Education Limited English (ELL) Low Income State Target AYP Matrix (37 categories)

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21 Mathematics Reading

22 Made AYP Did not make AYP Too small to evaluate Districts District 2003 and 2004 AYP Results Number of districts

23 “Making It”

24 AYP TIMELINE

25 AYP TIMELINE FOR DISTRICTS (Consequences apply only to districts receiving Title I funds)

26 State Improvement Plan U.S. Department of Education Offers Technical Assistance Step 1 12 AYP Identified for State Improvement AYP TIMELINE FOR STATES (Consequences apply only to sates receiving Title I funds) Federal Responsibility School Year

27 Highly Qualified Teachers All teachers teaching Core Academic Subjects must be “highly qualified” by Core Academic Subjects means English, Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Languages, Civics and Government, Economics, Arts, History, and Geography. Highly Qualified Certification means: Full State Teaching Certificate Certificate has not been waived on an emergency, temporary, or provisional basis. No Child Left Behind

28 Highly Qualified Teachers Existing Teachers: Bachelor’s Degree Hold a State Teaching Certificate Demonstrated Competence to Teach in Academic Subject Area (Endorsement) New Teachers : Bachelor’s Degree Hold a State Teaching Certificate Elementary: Pass a basic skills competency assessment as well as demonstrated competence in areas of reading, mathematics and writing and other areas of elementary curriculum Secondary: Pass a basic skills competency assessment as well as demonstrated competence in academic subjects in which the teacher teaches (endorsements) No Child Left Behind

29 Qualified Paraprofessionals Title I paraprofessional requirements: –a high school diploma or equivalent PLUS –completed at least two years of college, OR –obtained an associates (or higher) degree, OR –successfully pass a state or local academic assessment of mathematics, reading, and writing. State or local assessment must measure rigorous standards of quality that demonstrates (a) knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing, reading, writing and mathematics; OR (b) knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing, reading readiness, writing readiness, and mathematics readiness, as appropriate.

30 “Qualified Paraprofessional” Criteria Applies to: Title I paraprofessionals assisting with student instruction, including those “teaching in a program supported with Title I (Part A) funds” Title I paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002 must meet requirements upon hiring. Existing paraprofessionals must meet qualifications by January 8, 2006 EXCEPTION: paraprofessionals who serve primarily as translators, or whose duties consist solely of conducting parental involvement activities. No Child Left Behind

31 Communication with Parents NCLB obligates school districts to provide the parents of students enrolled in schools “in need of improvement” with information on: –What “in need of school improvement” means –Why the school was identified –What the school, the district and the state are doing to help address the achievement problems that led to the identification Parents must be informed of their option to transfer their child to another eligible school, availability of transportation, supplemental services available, and how they can participate in the improvement process

32 School Report Cards In addition to the current state reporting, this fall schools must supplement school performance reports to also include: –Comparison of student achievement to district and state results; –Assessment data by all demographic subgroups (statistically significant, not personally identifiable: WA = 10); –Whether the school has been identified for school improvement. OSPI has provided a school and district report card on-line as an option for schools and districts to use to meet this requirement. NCLB requires report cards to be “widely disseminated” at the beginning of each school year.

33 District Report Cards In addition to the current state reporting, this fall districts must supplement district performance reports to also include: –Student achievement at each proficiency level –Assessment data by all student subgroups –Comparison of student achievement to state results –Numbers and names of schools in the district that are in school improvement –Professional qualifications of the district teaching staff –Attendance rates - Elementary Graduation rates – Secondary “Right to Know” Districts must also separately notify parents that they can request specific information about individual teacher’s qualifications.

34 Parents Right to Know Requires districts to annually notify parents of their right to request information on the professional qualifications of their child’s teachers. –Licensing and certification for grade level and subject –Emergency or other provisional status –B.A. major and graduate degrees –Paraprofessionals and qualifications (if serving the child) Requires districts to notify parents if students have a teacher for 4 weeks that is not “highly qualified.” No Child Left Behind

35 Joy Hope Achievement No Skills No Heart Skills Heart

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